ANTH

ANTH 311 - Formerly 101 - Archaeological Method and Theory (4)
Archaeology relies on a body of theories and methods for reading human prehistory from the incomplete record left by past cultures. This course offers a counterpoint to ANTH 230 - Formerly 12 - /Prehistory in examining how questions asked by archaeologists are addressed. Topics include techniques of excavation and artifact analysis and the major theoretical approaches to archaeological inference. The course is divided between lecture and laboratory sessions in which students analyze archaeological data.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
ANTH 310 - Formerly 102 - Ethnographic Research Methods (4)
A course that serves as a rigorous exploration of the field methods and qualitative research techniques used in sociocultural anthropology. Topics to be covered include ethnographic interviews, participant observation, field notes, the role of surveys, the ethics of research with human subjects and the production of ethnographic knowledge. Course assignments will be cumulative-that is, each successive assignment will build off the previous one, culminating in a comprehensive research paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WM
ANTH 202 - Formerly 11 - Ecological Anthropology (4)
An interdisciplinary course that draws on data and theory from cultural and biological perspectives in anthropology and from environmental studies to question and examine the relationship of humans and the environment. Through comparisons of human cultural and biological adaptations to physical environments of the past and present, students gain a unique perspective on our impact on, relationship with, and place within the natural world.
Recommended: ANTH 103 - Formerly 3 - or 4 Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
ANTH 331 - Formerly 114 - Archaeology and Sustainable Culture (4)
Through Archaeology scholars reconstruct, examine, query and confront the record of past human-environment interactions. Placing these interactions in an historical context brings a long-term perspective to bear on contemporary issues. This course examines critically this record of human adaptations through time and across the globe with a particular focus on the ancient Americas. The view of archaeology is that the experiences of these ancient societies offer useful lessons about past choices which should affect the choices made today.
Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to majors and minors in Anthropology and Environmental Studies and to Archaeology minors. Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or 4 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: BSS, BI
ANTH 230 - Formerly 12 - Ancient Societies (4)
An introduction to the archaeological reconstruction of human prehistory beginning with the appearance of modern humans and culminating with the development of complex societies. The course focuses on major transitions in human prehistory: Upper Paleolithic developments in art and technology, the transition to agricultural societies, and the rise of stratified societies and urbanized cultures.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BI, BSS
ANTH 204 - Formerly 121 - Society and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
Much of what we hear, read and see about Africa in literature, the media and even in academic writing emphasizes the suffering, corruption, disease, war and strife that afflict much of the continent. To be sure, Africa is plagued by many of these issues, often to a far greater extent than other parts of the world. However, the sameness of tone and pessimism in the coverage of these problems often belies the diversity of culture and experience that is the African continent-which includes 53 countries, hundreds of different ethnic groups and a vast array of traditions, practices and beliefs. This course will examine a selection of different African societies and states from across the continent with an emphasis on how perspectives and ideas about traditional culture and practice intersect with the challenges-economic, religious, ethnic and political -faced by African cultures and the modern African nation state. The goal of this course is that students will leave with an appreciation of the cultural richness and regional variation that is sometime hidden by the usual generalizations and sterotypes that are often applied to Africa.

Fulfills: DIT
ANTH 312 - Formerly 124 - Human Osteology (4)
A study of human skeletal biology and bioarcheology. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the bones and anatomical landmarks of the human skeleton and how stress, disease, injury, and lifestyle affect them. The course includes some instruction in paleopathology and forensic anthropology, with laboratory exercises providing direct examination of skeletal material.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
ANTH 301 - Formerly 125 - Medical Anthropology (4)
The cross-cultural study of health and healing in ecological, evolutionary, and political-economic perspectives. Surveys cultural differences in health, reproduction, nutrition, disease ecology, medical systems, and mortality. Also considers the evolution of human disease and the efficacy of different medical systems.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
ANTH 326 - Formerly 126 - Evolution and Human Behavior (4)
A study of the basic principles of evolutionary theory as applied to the study of human social behavior. The course examines competing views on the importance of biology for understanding human behavior and considers the relationship between genes and culture.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ANTH 327 - Formerly 127 - Human Evolutionary Genetics (4)
A study of human genetics in evolutionary perspective. Topics include the structure of the human genome, human-ape comparisons, human genetic diversity, interpreting that diversity, what it tells us about human origins and migrations, effects of population admixture, health implications, and forensic DNA analysis.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or BIOL+7 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ANTH 302 - Formerly 130 - Anthropology of Religion (4)
A study of various aspects of religious beliefs and practices among small-scale societies and folk communities within larger human systems.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
ANTH 303 - Formerly 131 - Gender and Culture (4)
A study of the construction of gender across cultures. The course considers how culture influences and shapes gender roles in varying human domains, such as religion, creative traditions, work, scholarship and research, and popular culture.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined. Same as: WMST+131 WGST+131
ANTH 322 - Formerly 132 - Primatology (4)
The study of primate behavior, how it can be understood as environmental adaptation, its evolutionary significance, and how it compares to human behavior. Topics include primate ecology, social behavior, sociobiology, and cognition.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester in even numbered years.
ANTH 321 - Formerly 134 - Forensic Anthropology (4)
Forensic anthropology is a specialized field concerned with the application of the techniques of physical anthropology and human osteology to matters dealing with the law and the medico-legal professions. This course will provide students grounding in the specialist skills of a forensic anthropologist, including the identification and recovery of human remains, calculating the death interval, building a biological profile and identifying the cause and manner of death. The role of the forensic anthropologist in mass disasters, military service, and investigation of war crimes and other human rights violations will also be discussed. Labs will apply knowledge in practical scenarios such as identifying animal versus human remains, field search and recovery methods, determining age at death, sex, stature, ancestry, and identifying any antemortem conditions that may contribute towards a positive identification. Students will also learn how to identify any trauma or other pathological
Enrollment priority: Priority given to anthropology and biological anthropology majors, anthropology and archeology minors, juniors, and seniors. Prerequisite: ANTH+124 Corequisite: ANTH+134L Corequisite or Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with L.
ANTH 321L - Formerly 134L - Forensic Anthropology Laboratory
Lab for : Forensic Anthropology.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to anthropology and biological anthropology majors, anthropology and archeology minors, juniors, and seniors. Prerequisite: ANTH+124 Corequisite: ANTH+134 Corequisite or Prerequisite: L must be taken concurrently with .
ANTH 304 - Formerly 135 - Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology (4)
An investigation of one or more major subject areas in cultural anthropology. Topics vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise and may include visual anthropology, structural theory, and post-postmodernism.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
ANTH 330 - Formerly 136 - Selected Topics in Archaeological Method and Theory (4)
An investigation of one or more major subject areas in archaeology. Topics vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ANTH 320 - Formerly 137 - Selected Topics in Biological Anthropology (4)
An investigation of one or more major subject areas in biological anthropology. Topics vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise and may include intensive courses in primatology, human adaptability, osteology, anthropological genetics or other aspects of human biology.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: ANTH+3 Offering to be determined.
ANTH 380 - Formerly 140 - Archaeological Field Study (4)
This summer field course introduces students to archaeological field methods, including survey, excavation, and artifact recovery and processing. Instruction is through participation in an ongoing research project. Location of the field research site varies annually. Recent offerings include Ecuador and Maine.
Prerequisite: ANTH+101 Offered annually in summer.
ANTH 375 - Formerly 143 - Museums and Society (4)
This course explores the intersection of the museum and its public with a focus on the rise of the museum in the late eighteenth century and its development up to the present day. Why were museums created, and what purposes do these institutions serve? What values do they project? Such questions are addressed through selected case studies and readings of key theoretical texts in the field. Analysis of current museum and gallery exhibitions, discussion of such issues as the role of government, the interdependence of museums and the art market, and debates over repatriation, restitution and looting or theft will also be addressed.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years. Same as: ARTH - Formerly ARTHST+143
ANTH 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Anthropology (1-4)
A special program of study planned by the student in consultation with a faculty sponsor. Written proposal and permission of a faculty member required for approval.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
ANTH 400 - Formerly 199 - Senior Seminar in Anthropology (4)
An examination of anthropology as a profession. Discussion of current major issues in the discipline.
[CAP] Capstone Prerequisite: Senior standing in anthropology or behavioral science or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
ANTH 203 - Formerly 20 - Cultures, Economies, and Globalization (4)
In this course students learn about the relationships between systems of production and distribution and the social and cultural contexts in which they occur. After discussing some important theoretical approaches that have influenced economic anthropologists over the years, we consider various ethnographic case studies that provide a more nuanced understanding of both the material and symbolic aspects of economic processes. Throughout the course, we pay close attention to the ways in which global economic processes are articulated, and made meaningful, at the local level. We also contemplate the relationships between global capitalism and pressing social problems, including hunger, gender inequities, poverty, war, and environmental degradation.
Spring semester in even numbered years.
ANTH 220 - Formerly 23 - Intermediate Biological Anthropology (4)
The course is a survey of areas of current interest to biological anthropologists. It continues and builds upon material covered in ANTH+3. The focus is on human and primate biology with attention given to human evolution, osteology, geographic ("racial") variation, physiological adaptability, evolutionary genetics, primate and human behavioral ecology, human development and life history theory, health and disease, and nutrition. Students explore these topics in both lecture and lab, in which hands-on work with fossils and other materials provides experiential learning opportunities for deepening one's understanding of the biological and evolutionary underpinnings of human life, health, and behavior. Course format: twice weekly lecture sessions plus a lab.
Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to anthropology and biological anthropology minors. Prerequisite: ANTH+3 Offered fall semester annually.
ANTH 201 - Formerly 28 - History of Anthropological Theory (4)
An examination of the history of anthropology, from its philosophical foundations to contemporary directions and themes. Focuses on the main theoretical approaches in the field. Situates the contributions of major figures with references to intellectual traditions and contemporary problems.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4. Offered fall semester.
ANTH 103 - Formerly 3 - Human Evolution: Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (4)
An introduction to the study of human biological and cultural evolution using the methods and theories of biological anthropology and archaeology. The course surveys some basic principles of evolutionary theory, primatology, the hominid fossil record, origins of modern humans, their physical variation, and archaeological evidence for the evolution of symbolic behavior, agriculture, and civilization.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BNS
ANTH 231 - Formerly 30 - Native Arts and Archaeology of Latin America (4)
This course focuses on the development and character of indigenous cultures of Latin America before the arrival of Europeans. Themes of power, economy, religion, ritual, and symbolism that uniquely characterize Latin American native societies are examined primarily through art, architecture and material culture. The course follows a topical and comparative approach drawing on data from archaeology, art history, ethnography and ethnohistory
Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or 4 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ANTH 232 - Formerly 39 - Regional Archaeology (4)
An intensive archaeological study of a selected region, focusing on surveys, specific sites, and ethnohistoric and experimental evidence to derive sequences of human occupation, use, and principles of culture change.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or 4 Offering to be determined.
ANTH 104 - Formerly 4 - Cultural Diversity: Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics (4)
A comparative examination of the cultural diversity of humanity. Using case studies of peoples in differing contexts, the course presents theories and data on a range of topics for understanding contemporary human conditions, including subsistence strategies, political and economic systems, religion and expressive behavior, language, culture change, and the interdependence of cultures throughout the planet.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS, DIT
ANTH 206 - Formerly 50 - Topics in Cultural Anthropology (2-4)
This course engages in cultural analyses of contemporary social issues. Topics vary in accordance with student interest and faculty, such as public health crises, class inequality, environmentalism, gender politics, and ethnic conflict. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 Offering to be determined.
ANTH 251 - Formerly 51 - Arts of Africa and the Diaspora (4)
Topics discussed will include: Art and Audience (considering the relationship between the object and its content of display, which can include masking as well as royal regalia meant to reinforce leadership); Space and Place (art works as markers of space--spiritual, domestic, etc.)--and referents of place); The Cultured Body (the human form in art, as well as dress and body arts); and Africa in the World (art works that reflect Africa's historic engagement with the world, ie., use of imported materials, "foreign" iconography, but also the impact of African art in the world). Within these themes, we will examine select case studies in depth and will incorporate historic and contemporary forms.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years. Same as: ART+51 ARTH - Formerly ARTHST+51
ANTH 205 - Formerly 52 - Native North American Cultures (4)
The study of cultures of native North America immediately prior to the Columbian expansion of Europe and directions and dynamics of culture change to the present. Examines current issues, specifically points of contention with the U.S. and Canadian governments and other peoples now inhabiting Native American space.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
ANTH 58 - Museums and Society (4)
Using case studies from museum literature and situations, this course explores the intersection of museums with their public. It will probe the social location of museums, their function, exhibitions, educational role, and ideologies. Controversial matters such as governance, multiculturalism, globalization, the role of government, and artifact theft will be engaged in terms of changing cultural values.
Offered spring semester in even years. Same as: ARTH - Formerly ARTHST+58
ANTH 207 - Formerly 59 - Regional Ethnography: Societies of the Mediterranean (4)
An intensive cultural study of a selected region. Consideration of issues of indigenous development and contact with outsiders leading to consideration of issues of culture change. Topics vary in accordance with student need and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: DIT

ARBC

ARBC 101 - Formerly 1 - Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (4)
An introduction to Modern Standard Arabic. Students learn the Arabic script, the basic rules of Arabic grammar, appropriate vocabulary, reading, oral, and aural skills commensurate with the elementary level.
Consult instructor concerning the required language lab. Meets: Three hours class, one hour language laboratory. Corequisite: ARBC+3A. Offered fall semester.
ARBC 101 - Advanced Arabic (4)
A third-year Arabic course with continued study of the structure of the language and a focus on speaking and writing skills. This course includes and extensive review and refinement of Arabic grammar and will include advance reading materials from a variety of sources and multimedia assignments.
Prerequisite: ARBC+50 on permission of instructor. Offered fall semester.
ARBC 302 - Formerly 102 - Advanced Arabic II (4)
The second semester of the third year Arabic sequence with a focus on the finer points of grammar and syntax. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills will continue to be developed. Authentic texts and audio-visual materials will be used in conjunction with standard textbook materials to develop student proficiency.
Prerequisite: ARBC+101 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
ARBC 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Arabic (2-4)
A course for students who wish to continue the study of Arabic at an advanced level. Amount of credit established at time of registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
ARBC 101H - Formerly 1H - Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (4)
An introduction to Modern Standard Arabic. Students learn the Arabic script, the basic rules of Arabic grammar, appropriate vocabulary, reading, oral, and aural skills commensurate with the elementary level. Consult instructor concerning the required language lab. Students who have been placed in Arabic 1H in the Fall and Arabic 2H in the Spring are exempt from taking the co-curricular conversation courses, based on oral interviews during the placement period.
Meets: Three hours class. Offered fall semester.
ARBC 102 - Formerly 2 - Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II (4)
This two-credit course allows students enrolled in ARBC+1 (Elementary Arabic) to supplement their study of Arabic by working intensively on spoken Arabic. Emphasis is on developing the ability to produce and respond to spontaneous, fluid, clear, and syntactically correct spoken Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). To enroll in this course, students must also enroll simultaneously in ARBC I.
Meets: one hour per week Corequisite: ARBC+4.
ARBC 102H - Formerly 2H - Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II (2)
This two-credit course allows students to supplement their study of Arabic by working intensively on spoken Arabic. Emphasis is on developing the ability to produce and respond to spontaneous, fluid, clear, and syntactically correct spoken Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Students who have been placed in Arabic 1H in the Fall and Arabic 2H in the Spring are exempt from taking the co-curricular conversation courses, based on oral interviews during the placement period.
Meets: One hour per week. Offered spring semester.
ARBC 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I (4)
An intermediate-level study of writing, reading, oral, and aural skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Explores advanced structures of grammar, syntax, and expression. Students are also expected to gain a greater degree of cultural proficiency through appropriate readings, tapes, class discussions, and Arabic language films.
Meets: Three hours class, one hour language laboratory Prerequisite: ARBC+20, or equivalent as determined by placement exam Offering to be determined.
ARBC 104 - Formerly 4 - Arabic Conversation II (2)
This two-credit course allows student enrolled in Arabic I (Elementary Arabic) to supplement their study of Arabic by working intensively on spoken Arabic. Emphasis is on developing the ability to produce and respond to spontaneous, fluid, clear, and syntactically correct spoken Modern Standard Arabic (MSA).
Meets: The course meets one hour per week. Corequisite: ARBC+2 Offered spring semester.
ARBC 202 - Formerly 50 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II (4)
An advanced-level course in Arabic that will allow students to build active vocabulary and develop a higher level of proficiency in reading, writing, and oral expression. Students' command of Arabic grammar will be solidified through the mastery of basic grammatical terms and knowledge of syntax and morphology. The course will incorporate various readings, class discussion, and non-textual materials such as films and audio exercises that will provide a cultural component.
Prerequisite: ARBC+30 or Permission of the Instructor.
ARBC 299 - Formerly 99 - Arabic across the Curriculum (2)
Foreign Languages across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
May be taken twice (for a maximum of 4 credits) with two different cognate courses. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ARBC+30 or equivalent and signature of language instructor. Concurrent registration in a cognate course.

ART

ART 206 - Formerly 122 - Drawing II (4)
For students familiar with the basic techniques and media of drawing. Intermediate problems in drawing using the human figure and observation as a subject and a point of departure. Focus on the fundamental importance of drawing as the shared language of all the visual arts.
Prerequisite: ART+21 or ART+22 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ART 302 - Formerly 123 - Painting II (4)
An intermediate treatment of the media, techniques, and concepts of painting. Students are expected to pursue extensively particular problems of painting both inside and outside of class and with close critical involvement of the instructor. Encourages a critical awareness of contemporary painting. Includes museum and gallery visits.
Prerequisite: ART+23 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
ART 254 - Formerly 126 - Printmaking: Lithography (4)
An introduction to stone and/or plate lithography by way of examining the chemistry of the planographic process and its visual outcome. Emphasizes control of the image-making process. Develops students' pictorial language through discussions and museum and gallery visits.
Prerequisite: ART+2, 21, or 22 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
ART 212 - Formerly 127 - Ceramic Sculpture II (4)
Students develop more advanced and individualized approaches to clay. Emphasis on greater student independence and ambition in terms of confronting technical challenges and developing a personal direction.
Prerequisite: ART+27 Offered annually.
ART 308 - Formerly 128 - Sculpture II (4)
Advanced sculptural investigations. Students further develop and expand individual sculptural vocabularies, work toward generating projects and investigating processes that support the expression of their ideas.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ART+28 Offered annually.
ART 250 - Formerly 129 - Printmaking: Relief (4)
The technical and expressive potentialities of wood and linoleum cutting, collography, and monoprinting. Color and combined media processes are emphasized. Development of individual pictorial language follows a period of technical introduction and experimentation. Critiques as well as gallery and museum visits supplement the creative process.
Prerequisite: ART+2, 21, or 22, or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ART 252 - Formerly 130 - Printmaking: Intaglio (4)
Traditional and contemporary modes of intaglio plate-making processes are covered, as well as the development of imagery and expression appropriate to the media. Engraving, drypoint, various etching methods, embossing, and color printing processes are explored. Critiques are conducted regularly throughout the semester. Museum and gallery visits.
Prerequisite: ART+2, 21, or 22, or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ART 306 - Formerly 131 - Drawing III (4)
A continuation at an advanced level of ART 206 - Formerly 122 - /Drawing II.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ART+122 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ART 352 - Formerly 133 - Painting III (4)
A concentration on advanced painting problems. Students are expected to have an established direction in painting, which they pursue intensively both inside and outside of class and in close critical discussions with the instructor. A critical awareness of contemporary painting is expected, as are visits to museums and galleries.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ART+122 Offered annually.
ART 330 - Formerly 134 - Photography III (4)
This course allows for continued exploration of photography as an art medium for students working with either film or digital processes. Personal exploration of a subject or photographic approach is supported by ongoing critique and contextual instruction in photographic practices, advanced techniques, and the study of formal and conceptual issues within the medium. Students must provide a film or digital SLR camera and budget for film, printing costs and other supplies.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: ART+34. Offering to be determined.
ART 310 - Formerly 136 - Artist Writes (2)
Studio art majors will create and maintain their own artist's blog in which they will publish an artist statement, work portfolio, and respond to art exhibitions and art criticism. Students will write about their own practice as well as curate and publish an art journal connected to their developing identity as an artist.

Fulfills: WM
ART 400 - Formerly 140 - Selected Studio Projects (4)
An intensive studio practice designed for art majors working toward senior exhibition. Provides a basic framework to aid independent investigation, stressing the development of individual ideas and expression.
[CAP] Capstone Course may be repeated. Open only to senior art majors and minors Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
ART 402 - Formerly 141 - Advanced Studio Projects (4)
A continuation of ART+140 with even greater emphasis upon building a body of work that clearly reflects the individual's sensibility and ideas, culminating in a senior thesis exhibition in late April or early May in the Korn Gallery. Weekly critiques are conducted by the instructor and visiting artists.
[CAP] Capstone Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ART+140 Offered spring semester.
ART 385 - Formerly 145 - Semester on Contemporary Art (4-8)
Two days each week are spent in New York City visiting artists, curators, gallery directors, and critics. Regular viewing of gallery and museum exhibitions and private collections. Weekly seminar on campus concerning contemporary art historical and critical background and discussion of current developments. An ongoing journal of art criticism and course project.
Formal application is required of all students. Prerequisite: Two art courses, preferably one in 20th-century art, or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
ART 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Art (1-4)
Under special circumstances, an advanced student majoring in either studio or art history may plan, in conference with the instructor and with approval of the department, a closely supervised independent project in studio art, art criticism, museology, or art history, not otherwise provided in the courses of instruction. Written proposal and paper required.
Course may be repeated. Open only to upper-level art majors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually.
ART 104 - Formerly 2 - Two-Dimensional Design (4)
An introduction to the visual elements that constitute the basic issues of two-dimensional design. Primary goals are the development of technical and critical skills as they apply to painting, drawing, and graphic traditions. Investigates aspects of color, line, form, texture, and space through workshops and outside assignments. The foundation course for the intermediate- and upper-level studio courses.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
ART 106 - Formerly 21 - Drawing I (4)
An introduction to drawing as a way of making images, as a basis for work in other media, and as a process of discovery. Studio activities are grounded in observation and use various wet and dry media. Line, shape, and value are emphasized as basic components for exploring fundamental issues of composition, the structuring of form, the description of space and light, and as a means of individual expression.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
ART 202 - Formerly 23 - Painting I (4)
An exploration of traditional and modern techniques of oil painting and their underlying theories of light, color, space, and expression.
Prerequisite: ART+2, 21, 22, or permission of instructor Offered annually.
ART 256 - Formerly 25 - Printmaking: Serigraphy (4)
A study of techniques and concepts behind the silk-screen process as an art form. Explores a variety of negative and positive stencil-making methods. Covers registration procedures for multicolor printing and the making of editions. Emphasizes the exploration of the visual language. Discussions are conducted regularly. Museum and gallery visits.
Prerequisite: ART+2, 21, or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
ART 112 - Formerly 27 - Ceramic Sculpture I (4)
An introduction to the creative possibilities of ceramics emphasizing diverse approaches to clay as a sculptural material. Exploration of handbuilding techniques, glazing and firing, mold making and casting, as well as ceramic tile mosaic and mixed media, to consider issues of form, content, surface, scale, color, and process. Class discussions establish connections between clay investigations and fundamental questions from contemporary and art history.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ART 208 - Formerly 28 - Sculpture I (4)
An investigation of materials and processes, and conceptual and aesthetic concerns of sculpture. Students learn basic properties of various sculptural materials and consider the relationship between materials and ideas. Introduction to additive and subtractive processes, casting, assemblage, and mixed media serves as a vehicle for formal and expressive exploration, as well as consideration of fundamental sculptural issues, including space, time, scale, reference, content, and context. Studio activities are informed by intensive examination of contemporary and historic three-dimensional art through discussion and field trips.
Prerequisite: ART+3 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ART 108 - Formerly 3 - Three-Dimensional Design (4)
An introduction to the technical and conceptual basis for the organization and development of three-dimensional structures. Examines the function of space, volume, mass, plane, and line. Explores sculptural issues through the solution of design problems. Uses a variety of materials for physical and expressive qualities. Extensive out-of-class assignments supplement studio practice. Emphasizes the development of critical skills as they apply to visual aesthetic issues.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BA
ART 130 - Formerly 33 - Photography I (4)
An introduction to using digital SLR cameras, image editing tools and ink-jet printing to produce photographs that are challenging in both content and form. Students make photographs in response to assignments which address the major visual mechanisms fundamental to photography. Through lectures and ongoing group critiques, students gain confidence in evaluating photographs and understanding issues in the medium. Students must provide a camera and budget for printing costs and other supplies.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
ART 230 - Formerly 34 - Photography II (4)
This course utilizes essential elements in both traditional and digital photographic methods to expand knowledge and practice in the medium. Students expose and process black & white film, produce fine silver prints in the darkroom, build an alternative camera, respond to intermediate-level shooting assignments, and, conversely, gain a deeper understanding of digital capture and editing through firsthand experience with the roots of the medium. Includes museum and gallery visits. Students provide a camera or may rent one from Drew.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ART 120 - Formerly 35 - Digital Imaging (4)
This course introduces the computer as a fine arts tool, and provides an overview of digital arts concepts and terminology. Students will solve design problems using a variety of computer software applications. Critical awareness of new media in a historical context is encouraged through lectures, discussion and critiques.
Offered fall and spring semesters.
Fulfills: BA
ART 320 - Formerly 36 - Digital Animation (4)
An investigation of time, form and motion through the use of digital animation techniques. Students will explore the impact of the moving image on the history of art, with special emphasis on new media. Class critiques will create connections between traditional and digital art.
Prerequisite: (ART+35 or ART+37) Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BA, Q
ART 220 - Formerly 37 - Digital Video (4)
Introduces digital video as a creative tool and offers a technical understanding of the video camera and non-linear editing. Students will learn to manipulate time, space and sound to create sequential, narrative and experimental works. Projects explore both formal and conceptual issues integral to the history of video and filmmaking.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BA
ART 270 - Formerly 39 - Special Topics in Studio Art (2-4)
A studio topic or process not covered by regular offerings.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ART 130 - Formerly 3A - Photography I (4)
An introduction to using digital SLR cameras, image editing tools and ink-jet printing to produce photographs that are challenging in both content and form. Students make photographs in response to assignments which address the major visual mechanisms fundamental to photography. Through lectures and ongoing group critiques, students gain confidence in evaluating photographs and understanding issues in the medium. Students must provide a camera and budget for printing costs and other supplies
Offered every semester
Fulfills: BA

ARTH - Formerly ARTHST

ARTH 301 - Formerly ARTHST 101 - Greek and Roman Art (4)
This course studies the art and architecture of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, from the Bronze Age Aegean through the late imperial Roman era. The study will be chronological, with focus on topics that may include the "Greek revolution," Roman architectural innovations, social constructs and the human body, urban planning, and art and political ideology. The classical ideal and its revival may be explored, including study of the Romans as early collectors of Greek art.
Offered fall semester in odd numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
ARTH 302 - Formerly ARTHST 102 - Medieval Art (4)
This course examines the art produced from the fourth through the fourteenth centuries, from late antiquity through the end of the Gothic era. Painting, architecture, and sculpture will be the main concern, with some attention also to ivories, metalwork, and textiles. Works of art will be studied in their religious, political, social, and stylistic contexts, and topics may include the adaptation of late Roman art for Christian patrons, iconoclasm, monastic art, pilgrimage, manuscript painting and ideology, and the dissemination of architectural style.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
ARTH 303 - Formerly ARTHST 103 - Italian Renaissance Art (4)
The art of the Italian Renaissance from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries is examined in this course. Painting, sculpture and architecture of major artistic centers such as Florence, Rome and Venice and the diverse social structure of these autonomous city-states will be the main focus. Major figures such as Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Michelangelo, Cellini, and Titian are examined in a variety of political, social, and religious contexts. Issues concerning the paragone, the changing status of the artist, artist's biographies and the construction of identity, wealth, patronage both private and public, women, and the process by which art is made and changing philosophies of conservation are some of the topics discussed.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ARTH 304 - Formerly ARTHST 104 - Baroque and Rococo Art (4)
This class concentrates on the work of the major painters, sculptors and architects of the 17th century, including Bernini, Caravaggio, Rubens, and Velazquez. French, Italian, Flemish, Netherlandish, and Spanish art is discussed in the context of historical events such as the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation. Attention is given to the growth of the city as artistic center with particular focus on: Rome, Paris, Amsterdam and Madrid. Related issues pertaining to the growth of the art market, the patron/artist relationship, the emergence of the female artist, and the "international" exchange of ideas are just some of the issues addressed in this course.
Offered spring semesters in odd-numbered years.
ARTH 305 - Formerly ARTHST 105 - 19th-Century Art (4)
This course surveys art from the late eighteenth century to the turn of the twentieth, with a focus on the social and political contexts in which works were produced, exhibited, sold and interpreted. The changing definitions of modernity and modernism in the visual arts; ideal images of masculinity and femininity; the hierarchy of artistic genres and the rise of landscape painting are among the many themes discussed.
Offered spring semesters in odd-numbered years.
ARTH 306 - Formerly ARTHST 106 - Early 20th-Century Art (4)
This course focuses on painting and sculpture in the first half of the 20th century, exploring the revolutionary styles developed during this period. Subjects discussed include artists' preoccupation with the "primitive" and the unconscious, the concept of an "avant-garde" and the rise of the artistic manifesto, and the development of abstract visual languages.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
ARTH 307 - Formerly ARTHST 107 - American Art (4)
This course provides a chronological survey of American painting and sculpture produced between the colonial period and World War I and the diverse art historical methodologies (feminism, social history and psychoanalysis, for example) that have been employed to interpret it and write its histories. Some Native American material is also included. Works of art will be situated within their broad social historical contexts and considered in light of such topics as the "Americanness" of American art and the usefulness of studying art within individual national "schools"; the place of African-American and women artists in US art history; transnational exchange with Europe; the development and role of art institutions; the connections between American art and literature; and the relationship between art and national identity.
Offered every third year in spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
ARTH 208 - Formerly ARTHST 108 - Islamic Art (4)
This course examines the history of ten centuries of Islamic art and architecture both chronologically and thematically. It begins with a study of medieval Islamic art of the Near East and Mediterranean, examining major themes and regional variations. Study will then shift to select monuments of Islamic art from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. The focus may include architecture and manuscript painting, with some attention also to metalwork, pottery, and textiles. Issues considered may include: Islamic aesthetic attitudes, definitions of Islamic art, adaptations of a late antique artistic vocabulary, cross-cultural influence, architecture and ritual, and ideology and style in manuscript painting
Offered spring semester in even numbered years.
Fulfills: DIT
ARTH 312 - Formerly ARTHST 112 - Arts of Asia (4)
This course focuses on a special theme or period in Asian art, such as Chinese traditions and their modern expressions, the East Asian nature traditions, and arts of India.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ARTH 218 - Formerly ARTHST 118 - Seminar in Art History: (3)
Examination of an artist, period, or special art historical problem, sometimes involving preparation of an exhibition for the Korn Gallery. Topics such as Art and Religion, Secular Arts of the Middle Ages, Symbolism and the 1890's, Abstract and Sign in Twentieth Century Art, and Sex, Gender, and Power in Japanese Art. For advanced students. Research paper required.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Arthst 4 or 5 and permission of the instructor.
ARTH 319 - Formerly ARTHST 119 - Special Topics in Art History (4)
A topic or period of art history not covered by regular offerings. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, BA
ARTH 249 - Formerly ARTHST 142 - Museum Study (1)
May be taken in conjunction with any upper-level art history course for additional systematic study of originals in area museums. Papers, projects, and/or augmentation of the regular term paper are expected as a result of this study.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
ARTH 375 - Formerly ARTHST 143 - Museums and Society (4)
This course explores the intersection of the museum and its public with a focus on the rise of the museum in the late eighteenth century and its development up to the present day. Why were museums created, and what purposes do these institutions serve? What values do they project? Such questions are addressed through selected case studies and readings of key theoretical texts in the field. Analysis of current museum and gallery exhibitions, discussion of such issues as the role of government, the interdependence of museums and the art market, and debates over repatriation, restitution and looting or theft will also be addressed.
Corequisite: Must register for Arthst 143L. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years. Same as: ANTH+143
Fulfills: OCE
ARTH 310 - Formerly ARTHST 144 - Colloquium in Art History (4)
A course primarily based on student discussion, reading, argumentation, and presentation. Topics will vary and might include: Rivalry in the Renaissance: Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo; Bernini and the Visual Arts; Symbolism and the 1890s; Figurative Art of the 1940s-1980s. The colloquium will introduce students to various research methods, the scholarship related to the particular topic of the course. Students will become familiar with the variety of sources available and learn to access, assess and utilize them in a critical fashion.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every year.
Fulfills: BH, WM, WI
ARTH 385 - Formerly ARTHST 145 - New York Semester on Contemporary Art (4-8)
The New York Semester on Contemporary Art offers students the unique and exciting opportunity to learn about the ongoing history of art since 1945 through the combination of reading, class presentation and discussion, and visits to artists' studios, museum and gallery exhibitions and public art projects. By pursuing each of these paths of discovery students learn about the major movements associated with the postwar period (Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art, and others) as well as overarching themes of expression (identity, for example), changing processes and modes of making, interpretive methodologies, expanding definitions of art, relationships between art theory and practice, and the roles of art institutions and cultural workers (critics, curators, historians) in mediating our experience of contemporary art.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ARTH - Formerly ARTHST+106. Offered fall semester.
ARTH 350 - Formerly ARTHST 150 - Independent Study in Art (1-4)
Under special circumstances, an advanced student majoring in Art History may plan, in conference with the instructor and with approval of the department, a closely supervised independent project in art criticism, museology, or art history, not otherwise provided in the courses of instruction. Written proposal and paper required.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually.
ARTH 400 - Formerly ARTHST 199 - Research Seminar Capstone (4)
Topics vary. Reading and discussion of primary texts and scholarship pertinent to a special topic, such as Michelangelo, decorative ensembles of the 16th and 17th centuries, Symbolism and the 1890s, and Abstract Art. When possible, seminar topics are linked to a special exhibition on view in New York City. Seminars involve an in-depth study of the historiography and the scholarship related to a particular topic resulting in the ability to recognize and employ a variety of art historical methodologies and theories and contribute original research to the field through a final research paper or project.
[CAP] Capstone Offered every year.
Fulfills: BH
ARTH 231 - Formerly ARTHST 30 - Native Arts and Archaeology of Latin America (4)
This course focuses on the development and character of indigenous cultures of Latin America before the arrival of Europeans. Themes of power, economy, religion, ritual, and symbolism that uniquely characterize Latin American native societies are examined primarily through art, architecture and material culture. The course follows a topical and comparative approach drawing on data from archaeology, art history, ethnography and ethnohistory.
Prerequisite: ANTH+3, 4 or permission of the instructor. Check ANTH listings for up-to-date offering times. Same as: ANTH+30. Same as: ANTH+30.
ARTH 101 - Formerly ARTHST 4 - Western Art I: Ancient and Medieval (4)
This course explores the art and architecture of the ancient and medieval eras, including study of the cultures of the Mediterranean, Near East, and northern Europe. Students will master a chronological history of representation and investigate the relationship between works of art and the cultures in which they were produced.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BA, BH
ARTH 242 - Formerly ARTHST 42 - Aesthetics (4)
A study of a variety of questions centered upon philosophical aspects of art. Of primary concern are the notions of beauty, formalism, emotivism, criticism, expression, creation, and evaluation. Focuses on specific works of art as they serve to illuminate philosophical concerns.
Check PHIL listings for up-to-date offering times. Same as: PHIL+134
ARTH 243 - Formerly ARTHST 43 - History of Photography (4)
This course provides a loosely chronological overview of diverse photographic production beginning with early optical devices such as the camera obscura and continuing to contemporary digital practices. Students will become familiar with various photographic processes and techniques (daguerreotypes, albumen prints, platinum prints, pinhole photography, color, and others); styles and movements (f64, street photography, post-modernism, and others); individual practitioners; and theories of photography proposed by Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, susan sontag, and others. We will also explore how and why the history of photography has been, only recently, integrated into the larger history of art by studying the broad, societal, and technological roles of photography.
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BA, BH
ARTH 102 - Formerly ARTHST 5 - Western Art II: Pre-Modern and Modern (4)
This course is a chronological survey of western art and architecture from the fourteenth century through the early twentieth century. It explores various geographic regions and diverse contexts, religious, social, political and economic, in which the works were made. Key art historical periods such as the Renaissance, the Baroque, and subsequent movements such as Romanticism, Impressionism, and Modernism are discussed. Students will master a chronological history of art and architecture in relation to the cultures in which they were produced.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BA, BH
ARTH 251 - Formerly ARTHST 51 - Arts of Africa and The Diaspora (4)
Topics discussed will include: Art and Audience (considering the relationship between the object and its content of display, which can include masking as well as royal regalia meant to reinforce leadership); Space and Place (art works as markers of space--spiritual, domestic, etc.)--and referents of place); The Cultured Body (the human form in art, as well as dress and body arts); and Africa in the World (art works that reflect Africa's historic engagement with the world, ie., use of imported materials, "foreign" iconography, but also the impact of African art in the world). Within these themes, we will examine select case studies in depth and will incorporate historic and contemporary forms.
Check ANTH listings for up-to-date offering times. Same as: ANTH+51
ARTH 256 - Formerly ARTHST 56 - The Art of Ancient Egypt: History and Modern Myth (4)
In this course we study the art and architecture of ancient Egypt, from the Predynastic era through Roman rule, from the fourth millennium BCE to the fourth century CE. Students will master the major sites and monuments of ancient Egypt, achieving an in-depth understanding of the artistic, religious, political, and social contexts of these works. The second major goal of the course will be to study the historiography of ancient Egypt and consider contemporary constructions of the culture of ancient Egypt, examining the effect of global forces such as colonialism and discourses such as Orientalism on the creation of a history of Egypt. The strong local collections of ancient Egyptian art will be incorporated into the course through museum visits, discussion, and paper assignments.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, DIT, BA
ARTH 258 - Formerly ARTHST 59 - Word and Image:The Art of the Book (4)
This class examines the history of illustrated books from late antiquity through the early modern period, from early Christian Rome to Mughal India. Manuscripts and early printed books will be considered in terms of their original function and owners as well as how they have been used, collected, and appreciated up to the present day. The main concerns of the course will be the way in which the images in the manuscripts convey meaning in ways complementary to and beyond the text, reflect the interests of their patrons and the stylistic and economic concerns of their artists, and act as evidence of the devotional, social, and political contexts in which the books were produced.

Fulfills: DIT, BA
ARTH 260 - Formerly ARTHST 60 - History of Architecture from A to Z: Alberti to Zaha Hadid (4)
This course will explore the history of architecture from the revival of the classical architectural treatise in the 15th century by Leon Battista Alberti through contemporary use of computer generated designs such as works by Frank Gehry and Zaha Hadid's Bridge Pavillion, Zaragoza, Spain. (In 2004 Zaha Hadid was the first women to win the Pritzker Prize.) While we will explore some of the great monuments in the history of architecture such as Brunelleschi's dome of Florence Cathedral or Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum, discussing questions of design and technological innovation, we will also address broader questions surrounding the built environment as reflections of contemporary attitudes. Architecture, past and present, will be analyzed with respect to continuing ideals and contrasting innovations. We will also address issues such as sustainable and "green" architecture; the role of the female architect and the gendering of places and spaces; affordable housing; and the
Offered fall semester in even numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, BA
ARTH 219 - Formerly ARTHST AA1 - Special Topics in Art History (4)
A topic or period of art history not covered by regular offerings. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, BA

ASST

ASST 223 - Formerly 23 - Selected Topics in Asian Studies (2-4)
This course permits offering of various topics in Asian Studies which are not available on a regular basis. The course will often reflect some special interest of the person teaching it.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering varies.

BCHM

BCHM 395 - Formerly 120 - Research in Biochemistry (4)
An opportunity for upper-level students to participate in an independent research project with an interdisciplinary focus. A weekly research seminar meeting is required, where students present work in progress. A minimum of six hours laboratory per week, library work, and a final research paper are required, under the supervision of a biology, chemistry, or RISE faculty mentor. May be repeated once for credit.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHEM+117 or BIOL+156. Students wishing to do research with a member of the Chemistry Faculty must take CHEM+106 as a Prerequisite. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
BCHM 371 - Formerly 198 - Molecular Biology and Human Disease (4)
This research course will focus on addressing questions at the frontiers of science with the potential to combat infectious diseases and genomic instability disorders. Although several different questions will be tackled, all the research done in this course will stem from the use of fundamental and powerful techniques that underlie all of molecular biology. With an emphasis on experimental approaches that are cross-disciplinary, students will learn to develop testable hypotheses, design and execute experiments, and work collaboratively to solve problems involving on-going research projects. Students will present their findings through oral presentation throughout the semester.
BCHM 400 - Formerly 199 - Capstone Seminar (2)
Open only to senior biochemistry majors, and required for graduation. This course examines the current state of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology through reading and discussion of primary research articles and accounts of advances in the popular media. Students must write a mock grant proposal and participate in a funding meeting for the proposals. Additionally, students must pass a comprehensive oral examination administered by the biochemistry directors and advisory committee members.
[CAP] Capstone

BIAN - Formerly BIANT

BIAN 400 - Formerly BIANT 199 - Senior Seminar In Biological Anthropology (4)
Capstone course in biological anthropology designed to deepen and consolidate students' knowledge and understanding of the field. Overview of biological anthropology as a profession and discussion of current major issues and research topics. Students are required to write a research paper demonstrating understanding and competence in biological anthropology, as well as ability to use the discourse of biological anthropology and make a competent survey of the published literature in the field. They share their research with the rest of the class in a way conducive to thoughtful discussion and analysis of key issues and methods in biological anthropology.
[CAP] Capstone Restricted to juniors and seniors. Enrollment priority: Priority is given to biological anthropology majors and seniors. Prerequisite: Pre-Requisite: senior standing in biological anthropology or anthropology. Offered every spring semester.

BIOL

BIOL 102 - Formerly 1 - The Biological Basis of Human Sexuality (4)
An introduction to human sexuality, broadly defined from a biological point of view. General topics include consideration of genetic, gonadal, hormonal, phenotypic, and brain sex. Discusses sexual arousal, human sexual response cycles, contraceptive techniques, pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as the biological contributions to sexual behavior. Includes a study of the relationship of the reproductive system to other systems of the body. Does not meet requirements for major or minor in biology.
Meets: Four hours class Offered annually.
Fulfills: BNS
BIOL 356 - Formerly 120 - Cell and Molecular Neurobiology (4)
The structure and function of neurons, the basic building blocks of the nervous system, are investigated. The course builds to an understanding of how neuronal cell function determines higher brain processes, such as sensation and memory. The laboratory employs living neurons' growth in culture to explore topics such as growth of neurites, cell signaling pathways, and neural degeneration.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+22 Offered annually. Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+120
BIOL 346 - Formerly 121 - Systems Neurobiology (4)
The neurons of the nervous system are organized into systems that can be defined on the basis of function, anatomy or neurochemistry. This course explores the development of these systems, coordination of the activity within each system, and clinical disorders arising from malfunctions. The laboratory uses current neuroanatomical, pharmacological and neurochemical techniques to explore structure and function.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+9, BIOL+22 and CHEM+7. Corequisite: BIOL+121L Offered annually. Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+121
BIOL 346L - Formerly 121L - Systems Neurobiology Laboratory
No description is available for this course. Corequisite: BIOL+121
BIOL 358 - Formerly 127 - Diseases of the Brain (4)
An in-depth study of neurologic diseases. Case studies of affected patients are used to undestand the relationship between the physical changes and the behavioral impairments in these diseases. Biological mechanisms to explain the pathological and clinical manifestations of the diseases are investigated. Genetic and environmental risk factors are studied to explore etiology. Current therapies and ongoing scientific research into novel treatments are evaluated.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: BIOL+22 Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+127
Fulfills: WI
BIOL 344 - Formerly 134 - Endocrinology (4)
A study of the structure and function of mammalian hormone systems. After a general discussion of the major classes of hormones, an in-depth exploration of individual endocrine systems involved in regulating sexual development, body fluid balance, the stress response, and other physiological processes. Topics will include the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating hormone action, the central and peripheral control of endocrine systems, and clinical correlates of endocrine dysfunction.
Prerequisite: BIOL+7, BIOL+22, CHEM+25. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: WI
BIOL 364 - Formerly 138 - Advanced Cellular Biology (3)
Advanced study of cell components and functions. Topics include the role of eukaryotic chromosome structure in gene function, control of macromolecule movement between cell compartments, intracellular vesicle. trafficking, intracellular communication pathways and networks, how the cytoskeleton produces the forces that change cell shape and organization, and the mechanisms by which cells interact in a multicellular organism. Regular oral presentations and a review paper.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: BIOL+22 and CHEM+26, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL+139 if offered during the same semester. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 340 - Formerly 140 - Vertebrate Morphogenesis (4)
Vertebrate anatomy and embryology integrated into a single sequence relating adult morphology to embryological development and adaptation. Stresses basic principles of vertebrate organization, functional considerations of morphology, homologies among vertebrate structures, and evolutionary relations of vertebrate groups. Laboratory work includes comparative studies of various vertebrate types and field trips to the Bronx Zoo and American Museum of Natural History. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and BIOL+9, or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester.
BIOL 366 - Formerly 142 - Developmental Biology (4)
Examination of the principles of development and mechanisms involved in the growth , shaping, and differentiation of organisms. Topics include gene regulation in multicellular organisms, cytoplasmic determination, interactions with extracellular matrix, organ morphogenesis, and mechanisms regulating the pattern of biological structures. In the laboratory, traditional and modern biological techniques and procedures are applied to the study of development.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours lab. Prerequisite: BIOL+22 and CHEM+7 Offering to be determined.
BIOL 302 - Formerly 145 - Geographic Information Systems (4)
This course explores GIS (Geographic Information System) and related spatial analysis tools, which are used to elucidate the natural landscape and human modification of the earth's surface. Students will acquire cartographic, ArcGIS, and remote sensing skills through case studies and individual research investigations.
Enrollment priority: Given to majors in Biology,Environmental Studies,and Archaeology. Same as: ESS+145
Fulfills: Q, BI
BIOL 304 - Formerly 146 - Earth's Dynamic Surface:From Mount Everest to Ocean Floor (4)
The Earth's surface is diverse, with mountains, rivers, coasts, and glaciers existing in various locations on the planet. It is also dynamic, as mountains rise and fall, rivers meander, and coastlines evolve. In this course, we will explore how and why the Earth looks the way that it does, while considering important factors such as the impacts of climate, sea level changes, human activities, and plate tectonics. We will use the New Jersey landscape as a case study, exploring how it has changed from a landscape like the East African Rift, to its present, muted topography. Students will learn basic techniques for field geologists, methods of data analysis and presentation, and skills for effective reading of peer-reviewed literature.
. These skills will be directly relevant to students interested in environmental science, ecology, archaeology, Prerequisite: Introductory lab science course or /Introduction to Environmental Science. To be determinded. Same as: ESS+146
BIOL 362 - Formerly 152 - Virology (4)
A survey of animal viruses with emphasis on human pathogens and mechanisms of viral pathogenesis. Course content includes topics such as the physical and chemical properties of viruses, viral cultivation, assay and analysis, and multiplication of both DNA and RNA viruses within the animal cell.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: BIOL 250 - Formerly 22 - ,26 and CHEM+25. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 348 - Formerly 154 - Immunology (4)
An introduction to the principles of immunology. Stresses the nature of antigens, antibodies, and antigen-antibody interactions; humoral and cellular immune responses governing antibody production, hypersensitivities, transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, and neoplasia. Includes discussions on immunogenetics, immunoregulation, and the concept of immune networks.
Meets: Three 65-min classes. Prerequisite: BIOL+22 and CHEM+25. Offered spring semester.
BIOL 358L - Formerly 155 - Laboratory in Immunology (1)
Laboratory option serving BIOL+154. Experimental work in fundamentals of immunology; involves use of live animals. Exercises include immunization and bleeding techniques, gel diffusion tests, immunoelectrophoresis, immunofluorescence, Jerne plaque assay, ELISA and skin transplantation in rodents. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Co/prerequisite: BIOL+154. Meets: Three hours laboratory Offered spring semester.
BIOL 368 - Formerly 156 - Molecular Genetics (4)
A course concerned with the structure, synthesis, and function of nucleic acids, proteins, and other cell components, using primary literature as well as current texts. Includes prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics and mechanisms for rearrangement and exchange of genetic material (mutations, conjugation, transformation, transduction, transposition, and gene-splicing). Experimental work, advanced laboratory techniques, and independent projects. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL 150 - Formerly 7 - ,9,22 and CHEM+26 (co-or pre-requisite), or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester.
BIOL 348L - Formerly 158L - Lab for Immunology (1)
Lab for Immunology
Optional Lab. Corequisite: Pre-req or Co-req of BIOL+348 required.
BIOL 330 - Formerly 160 - Emerging Infectious Disease (4)
Scientific advances in the late 19th and early 20th centuries resulted in the prevention and control of many infectious diseases, particularly in industrialized nations. Despite these improvements in health, outbreaks of infectious diseases continue to occur and new infections continue to emerge, some with devastating effects. This course will address trends in infectious diseases, analyze factors contributing to disease emergence, and discuss the development and implementation of prevention and control measures. Relevant topics in microbial pathogenesis and transmission, as well as important aspects of international health will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: BIOL+4A OR BIOL+26.
BIOL 338 - Formerly 162 - Ornithology (4)
An advanced course for biology majors interested in the biology of birds. Topics include: anatomy, physiology, distribution and systematics, with emphasis on avian ecology, behavior, and evolution. Through integrated laboratories, field trips, and discussions of the primary literature, students learn the identification of birds, functional morphology, and research techniques such as experimental design, behavioral observation, and statistical analyses. Two weekend field trips. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and 9. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
BIOL 312 - Formerly 166 - Evolutionary Genetics (4)
An exploration of major concepts in evolutionary biology. Topics include population genetics, quantitative genetics, natural selection, molecular evolution, speciation, systematics, and paleobiology. Although the primary emphasis will be on theoretical concepts, students will be introduced to the methods used to test evolutionary hypotheses in both lecture and lab. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7, 9, and 22, or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
BIOL 314 - Formerly 167 - Animal Behavior (4)
An investigation of the behavior of animals from an evolutionary perspective Topics to be covered include foraging, vigilance, social behavior, mating strategies, animal communication, and more. Lectures and discussions will focus on theoretical principles supported by empirical examples from organisms such as dung beetles, striped plateau lizards, song sparrows, and various primate species. Laboratories will be focused on experimental design and learning the techniques of conducting animal behavior research. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and 9, or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
BIOL 308 - Formerly 169 - Conservation Biology (4)
An exploration of the major principles of conservation biology-the study of maintaining biological diversity. We will examine the foundations of conservation biology, its biological concepts (principles and theories), and the applications of such concepts to preserving biodiversity. This course emphasizes the application of evolutionary and ecological theory to the preservation of threatened species, but also considers economic, political and philosophical perspectives. Classroom activities will facilitate understanding of the principles of conservation biology, and field trips will provide direct exposure to the practice of conservation biology. Appropriate for students in biology and environmental studies.
Meets: Three hours class. Prerequisite: BIOL+7 or 9, or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
BIOL 334 - Formerly 171 - Plant Morphology and Identification (2-4)
A survey of the taxonomy and structure of living plant groups, with emphasis on field identification of live material. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory when offered for 4 credits; and one hour class and three hours laboratory when offered for 2 credits Prerequisite: Biol 7 or Biol 9 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
BIOL 324 - Formerly 173 - Forest Ecology (4)
The study of the structure, composition, and dynamics of forest communities. Topics include succession, paleocology, biotic interactions, and threats to forest integrity. Laboratory emphasizes methods of vegetation sampling and analysis of ecological data, through intensive study of the campus forest preserve and through field trips to diverse forest types. Fulfills laboratory requirement for the major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7 Offered fall semester annually or biannually.
BIOL 306 - Formerly 178 - Biogeography (3)
The study of the distribution of organisms on earth. Topics include global vegetation zones today and in the past; geological and climatic influences on species distributions; island biogeography; dispersal by plants and animals; and human impact on species distributions and on extinction patterns.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: BIOL+7 Corequisite: BIOL+179 offered during the same semester. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 320 - Formerly 183 - Tropical Marine Ecology (4)
Weekly lecture, laboratory, and pool work at Drew followed by intensive week in the field during spring recess at a site in the Caribbean. Snorkeling-based observations of ecological relationships among reef fish and invertebrates. Also includes the ecology of reefs, sea grass beds, rocky shore, and mangrove habitats. (Extra costs borne by the student are transportation and room and board at off-campus site.) Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Enrollment limit: 12 Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and BIOL+9 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: OCE
BIOL 318 - Formerly 186 - Freshwater Ecology (4)
An exploration of physical, chemical, and especially biological components of freshwater ecosystems. Considers lotic (moving water) systems, but emphasizes lentic (standing water) ecosystems. Laboratory concentrates on field and follow-up techniques for collecting and evaluating ecological information. Field work is centered on ponds within the campus arboretum, with field trips to other local freshwater habitats included. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and BIOL+9 Offered fall semester annually or biannually.
BIOL 390 - Formerly 191 - Seminar in Biology (2)
Reports and discussions on selected topics in biology. Each student participates in weekly discussions and makes one formal presentation orally on a specific subject investigated in depth through the current literature.
Course may be repeated. Meets: Two hours class Prerequisite: BIOL+7, 9, and 22, or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 370 - Formerly 192 - Topics in Biology (2-4)
Topics that enrich the regular biology curriculum are offered as opportunities arise. Number of credits and prerequisites vary with course topic.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 394 - Formerly 195 - Independent Study in Biology: Literature Research (2-4)
An in-depth study through literature research and written literature review on a topic in biology selected by individual students in conjunction with a faculty member, who will supervise the research. A 35-minute weekly research seminar meeting is required, where students present work in progress and receive logistical guidance.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: minimum GPA of 2.00 in the major. Offered every semester.
BIOL 396 - Formerly 196 - Research in Biology (2-4)
An opportunity for upper-level students to design and execute an independent project in biology, including laboratory or field research, under the supervision of biology, neurosciences, or RISE faculty. A one hour weekly research seminar meeting is required, where students present work in progress and receive logistical guidance. Interested students should meet with a faculty member to plan the project and establish the amount of credit before registration. Students normally enroll for two credits, especially when beginning a new project. Students conducting honors research in biology should register for this course at the four-credit level rather than registering for HON+109 and 110. Two semesters of BIOL+196 satisfy one laboratory course requirement toward the major.
May be repeated for credit but at most eight credits of BIOL+195 and 16 may be counted toward requirements for the biology major. Signature of instructor required for registration. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BIOL+7, 9, and 22, and a minimum GPA of 2.00 in the major. Offered every semester.
BIOL 250 - Formerly 22 - Molecular and Cellular Biology (4)
An introduction to composition, structure, and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, using themes of energy and reproduction. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, and translation, mutations, gene regulation, membrane function, cellular communication, motility, absorption, and secretion. Laboratory includes current research techniques such as cell culture nucleic acid characterization, cloning, and restriction mapping.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: or and CHEM+7. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
BIOL 254 - Formerly 24 - Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology (4)
An examination of the structure and function of various physiological systems, such as circulation, respiration, and reproduction. How organs and organ systems evolved, how they function at a biochemical and biophysical level, how they are regulated, and how the functions of multiple systems are interconnected and coordinated within the whole organism. Laboratory will include the exploration of the dynamic function and regulation of human physiological systems and the study of anatomy through dissection of animal specimens.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+9, BIOL+22 and CHEM+7. Offered spring semester.
BIOL 252 - Formerly 26 - Microbiology (4)
A comprehensive introduction to the nature and diversity of microorganisms and the roles they play in health, disease, and the ecosystem. Covers bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi. This course examines the ecological, structural, cellular, and molecular features of microbes and explores how some of these features affect host/microbe interactions. Laboratory work incorporates methods of bacterial isolation and identification, including microscopy, use of selective and differential media, biochemical and serological tests, and rapid ID methods.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+9, BIOL+22, CHEM+25 Offered spring semester.
BIOL 101 - Formerly 3 - Environmental Biology (4)
An introductory study of ecology and environmental quality. Includes a survey of the impact of people on the environment and suggestions for meeting our future biological and technological needs in environmentally compatible ways. Does not meet requirements for major or minor in biology.
Meets: Three hours class. Offered annually.
Fulfills: BNS
BIOL 215 - Formerly 30 - Environmental Science (4)
This course explores the science behind environmental problems and solutions. Students study current environmental issues in the context of their scientific (biological, chemical, geological) underpinnings, while alos considering the political, social and cultural dimensions of these issues. The course also addresses the role of scientific knowledge in understanding and resolving environmental problems, such as climate change, population growth, deforestation, extinction, air and water pollution, food production, and environmental health. These topics are explored through readings, films, student writing, research and field trips.
Enrollment priority: Given to majors and minors in Biology and Environmental Studies. Meets: Three hour class. Annually. Same as: ESS+30
Fulfills: BNS
BIOL 103 - Formerly 4A - Microbes in Health and Disease (4)
An introduction to the microbial world with emphasis on the importance of microbes in human survival and well-being. Topics include microbes and ecosystems, biotechnology and microbiology, emerging infectious diseases, microbes as weapons of bioterrorism and warfare, and microorganisms as research tools.
Site visits to nearby pharmaceutical, water purification, and sewage treatment plants. Meets: Three hours class. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BNS
BIOL 104 - Formerly 5 - DNA and Biotechnology Today (4)
A course for non-science majors in which students study the structure and function of DNA as a background to understanding hereditary traits and genetic diseases. Current events are used as a context for study. Topics include the Human Genome Project, molecular forensics, bioremediation using DNA technology, and gene therapy. Format of class includes lectures, student presentations, and hands-on activities during the designated class time. Does not meet requirements for major or minor in biology.
Meets: Four hours class Offered annually.
Fulfills: BNS
BIOL 150 - Formerly 7 - Ecology and Evolution (4)
An exploration of evolutionary and ecological processes and consequences, with close examination of population dynamics, population genetics, principles of heredity, the evolution of adaptations, community interactions, ecosystems, and biodiversity. Laboratory includes field-based investigations of upland and wetland ecosystems, as well as simulations and laboratory experiments.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS, WM
BIOL 160 - Formerly 9 - Diversity of Life: Animals, Plants, and Microbes (4)
A survey of the animals, plants, fungi, protista, and bacteria of Planet Earth, with comparative analysis of adaptations for survival, reproduction, development, and metabolism. Laboratory emphasizes experimental methods of science as well as morphology and physiology of the major phyla.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Corequisite: Must register for Biol 9L. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WM, BNS
BIOL 270 - Formerly 90 - Topics in Biology (2-4)
Topics that enrich the regular biology curriculum are offered as opportunities arise. Number of credits and prerequisites vary with course topic.
Amount of credit established at registration. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
BIOL 160LA - Formerly 9LA - Laboratory in Diversity of Life (1)

Enrollment priority: Laboratory option only available to students earning a score of 4 or 5 on the AP biology exam AND passing exam at Drew exempting from lecture component of the course. Meets: Three hour laboratory. Offered spring semester.

BSC

BSC 111 - Formerly 10 - Corporations in Context (4)
This course examines the institution of the for-profit business corporation in its economic, legal, political, and social contexts. The course will develop critical perspectives on the corporation and use case studies to illustrate key issues such as competition, cooperation, corporate culture, shareholder value, employee motivation, community relations, public relations, labor relations, lobbying and political influence, and corporate governance, leadership, information management, finance, retail and manufacturing operations, environmental impact, globalization, corporate philanthropy, and business ethics.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BI
BSC 250 - Formerly 29 - Business, Society & Culture Special/Selected Topics (4)
Description developed and proposed by course instructor and approved by the BSC Director and BSC Committee.
Course may be repeated. Student may only take one BSC special/selected topics course for credit. Open to BSC minors only. Signature of BSC Director required. Offering to be determined.

BST - Formerly BUS

BST 101 - Formerly BUS 1 - Principles of Financial Markets I (4)
This course studies the institutions and operations of financial markets, and their roles in channeling credit and financing new investments. Students will learn the impact of the financial system on local, national, and global economies. The course will also explain the financial history and ethical dimensions of Wall Street and its relation to macroeconomic policy.
Offered summer term only.
BST 111 - Formerly BUS 10 - Corporations in Context (4)
This course examines the institution of the for-profit business corporation in its economic, legal, political, and social contexts. The course will develop critical perspectives on the corporation and use case studies to illustrate key issues such as competition, cooperation, corporate culture, shareholder value, employee motivation, community relations, public relations, labor relations, lobbying and political influence, and corporate governance, leadership, information management, finance, retail, and manufacturing operations, environmental impact, globalization, corporate philantropy, and business ethics.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BI
BST 310 - Formerly BUS 101 - Management (4)
This course explores theories and practices in the fields of management and organizational behavior. The course will explore how businesses, the government, and non-profit groups are organized, and why. The course will also examine the behavior of firms concerning issues of governance. Examining the relationship between strategy, market structure and the corporate environment, the course will enhance the knowledge of students of how managers function in both the domestic and global business environments.
Prerequisite: ECON+102 or permission of instructor. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
BST 321 - Formerly BUS 120 - Corporate Finance (4)
A study of selected problems and issues in the field of finance. Topics include the use of financial statements, ratio analysis and the valuation of assets, especially derivatives (e.g., futures and options).
Prerequisite: ECON+102. Offered annually. Same as: ECON+120
BST 115 - Formerly BUS 15 - Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (4)
This introductory course exposes students to the accounting principles and practices used by decision-makers associated with a business or governmental entity. Major topics include the accounting cycle, preparation and analysis of financial statements, standards and procedures for assets and liabilities, and the roles of corporate communication and responsibilities with respect to the accounting process.
Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Offered every semester.
BST 400 - Formerly BUS 150 - Business Studies Capstone (2)
The capstone is designed to pull together and enhance work that business studies majors have done in prior courses; students present their research to each other and faculty members throughout the term. Expanded research paper and oral presentation required.
Seniors Only. Offered every semester.
BST 102 - Formerly BUS 2 - Principles of Financial Markets II (4)
This course delves into the practical day-to-day operations of the financial markets and institutions located in New York City. The course will involve talks by guest speakers drawn from the finance industry itself, as well as from corporations, government regulatory agencies, and institutional investors, shareholder activists, academics and nonprofit agencies. The class will also go on field trips to securities firms, the New York Stock Exchange, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and various commodity exchanges. Speakers, field trips, and student projects explore recent issues, such as the impact of derivatives and other financial innovations.
Offered summer term only.

CE

CE 101 - Formerly 1 - Civic Engagement Workshop (1)
Topics and skills important to effective civic engagement. Topics include goal setting for civic engagement, working effectively in groups, understanding your leadership style, reflecting on community service, event planning and marketing, reflective listening, coalition building, motivating and managing volunteers, and others as the needs of the group dictate.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Signature of the program director required for registration. Offered every semester.

CEXP

CEXP 1 - Off-Campus Experience
Students may fulfill their general education requirement of an off-campus experience in many ways: through an internship, a study abroad experience, a Drew International Seminar, a language or teaching practicum, a community-based learning course, or a non-credit bearing service project. In order to complete the general education requirement, students connect the off-campus experience they have chosen with their academic program by writing a reflective essay after the experience is complete. Students register for CEXP+1 either simultaneous with the experience or in the semester after they have completed the experience. Once the reflective essay is complete and has been reviewed by the appropriate faculty member, a grade of "P" will be recorded for CEXP+1, indicating the completion of the graduation requirement.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.

CHEM

CHEM 330 - Formerly 103 - Physical Chemistry I (4)
A study of the basic principles of quantum mechanics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and structure. Topics include quantum mechanics of translation, vibration, and rotation, application of quantum mechanics to atomic spectra and atomic structure, molecular orbital theory of diatomics and conjugated polyatomics, electronic spectroscopy of diatomics and conjugate systems, vibrational spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elementary nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory experiments emphasize the use of the above mentioned spectroscopies in the determination of molecular structure.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+26 and MATH+8 and PHYS+12 Offered fall semester.
CHEM 331 - Formerly 105 - Physical Chemistry II (4)
A study of the principles of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics describing the state functions-internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, physical and chemical equilibria, statistical thermodynamics, rate laws and their determination, theories of reaction rates, reaction mechanism and catalysis. Laboratory experiments seek to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of systems using spectroscopic techniques as far as possible.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+103 Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHEM+26, MATH+8, and PHYS+12. Offered spring semester.
CHEM 320 - Formerly 106 - Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry (4)
A study of the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry, including error analysis and statistics, multiple equilibrium, electrochemistry, and introduction to spectroscopic methods, and an advanced study of acids and bases in aqueous solutions. Laboratory includes titrimetry, spectrophotometry, and electroanalytical methods.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+26 and PHYS+12 Offered fall semester.
CHEM 321 - Formerly 107 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry (4)
A study of the principles of instrumental analysis, including signal/noise ratios, and the fundamentals of spectroscopy and chromatography. The components of a wide variety of instruments are examined in detail. Laboratory provides hands-on experience with modern analytical instrumentation, including gas and liquid chromatography, absorption and fluorescence, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption, Fourier Transform infrared and Fourier Transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+106 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
CHEM 391 - Formerly 112 - Co-op Work II (8)
A continuation of CHEM+30 but at a more advanced level. Normally a student is located in the same company as in CHEM+30 and has the same mentor. The work is more specialized and includes a project in such areas as research, computing, technical library work, marketing, production, or personnel. The exact project and objectives are determined before work begins. Emphasizes safety, use of the chemical literature, and reporting (oral and written). At least one on-site visit is made by the co-op director.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: CHEM+30 Offered from June to December.
CHEM 351 - Formerly 116 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (4)
An advanced treatment of organic chemical reactions and processes pertaining to the design, syntheses, and analysis of various types of compounds, including biologically important medicinal and pharmaceutical agents, industrial and specialty chemicals and molecules of theoretical significance. The laboratory segment involves multistep organic synthesis, qualitative instrumental and advanced spectroscopic analysis.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+26 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
CHEM 360L - Formerly 117 - Biochemistry I (4)
A study of the fundamental principles of protein biochemistry with an introduction to metabolism. Topics include chemistry of amino acids, relationship between protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, regulation of enzymatic activity. The laboratory focuses on the application of biochemical principles to the solving of biological problems in living systems. Laboratory experimental methods include protein and nucleic acid characterization, purification of enzymes, enzyme kinetic measurements, and forensic biochemistry.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Recommended: BIOL 250 - Formerly 22 - . Prerequisite: CHEM+26 Corequisite: CHEM+118 Offered fall semester.
CHEM 361 - Formerly 119 - Biochemistry II (4)
A thorough study of the chemistry, regulation, and integration of our human metabolic pathways. Topics involving human metabolism include bioenergetics, the biosynthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and a study of various metabolic diseases (i.e. diabetes). Additional topics include chemistry of nucleic acids, gene expression, signal transduction pathways, and photosynthesis.
Meets: Four hours class Prerequisite: CHEM+117 Offered spring semester.
CHEM 342 - Formerly 120 - Laboratory in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (1)
A study of advanced inorganic synthesis and characterization techniques, including magnetic susceptibility, non-aqueous solvents, the preparation and resolution of chiral coordination complexes, synthesis of organotransition metal compounds, and inorganic polymers.
Meets: Three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+27, 106 Offered spring semester.
CHEM 362 - Formerly 121 - Chemical Biology (4)
This upper-level course, open to all chemistry and biochemistry majors, as well as other students with a strong background in chemistry and molecular biology, will address the following questions: (1) What is chemical biology and (2) What can chemical biology do to advance science and human health? In this course, students will consider varying definitions of "chemical biology" and explore examples of each of these views. Topics may include small molecule screens to decipher biological networks, genetic control with small molecules, directed evolution, self-replication, and approaches towards next-generation antimicrobials.
Enrollment priority: Senior and Junior Majors and Minors in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM+117.
CHEM 341 - Formerly 124 - Advanced Topics in Physical and Inorganic Chemistry (4)
A study of advanced topics in both physical and inorganic chemistry. Topics in physical chemistry include molecular symmetry and group theory and their application to electronic and vibrational spectra of molecules, Fourier Transform nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, Mossbauer and photoelectron spectroscopies. Topics in inorganic chemistry include coordination and organometallic chemistry. Builds on CHEM+27 and CHEM+103 to consider theoretical spectroscopic perspectives of coordination compounds. Topics in organometallic chemistry include the Effective Atomic Number Rule, reactions and catalysis, and transition metal clusters.
Prerequisite: CHEM+27 and CHEM+103 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
CHEM 395 - Formerly 129 - Research in Chemistry (4)
An opportunity for upper-level students to receive credit for independent and/or original work, which may lead to candidacy for honors. A one-hour weekly research seminar meeting plus a minimum of six hours laboratory per week working under the supervision of either chemistry or RISE faculty. Independent library work is also expected. Research seminar includes discussion of research results, online chemical database searching and current topics in chemistry. Attendance at department colloquia is also required. Credit for research is awarded on satisfactory completion of a research paper. Registration is accepted only after a student has selected a project following consultation with at least two possible research advisers. May be taken for a second semester but total credits may not exceed eight credits.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHEM+106 Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
CHEM 400 - Formerly 130 - Senior Seminar (1)
Open only to senior chemistry majors. Required for graduation and involves a formal presentation of the student research project completed in 129/Research in Chemistry, and a pass in the departmental comprehensive oral exam.
[CAP] Capstone Prerequisite: CHEM+129 Offered spring semester.
CHEM 401 - Formerly 135 - Co-op Seminar (1)
Final reports are presented by co-op seniors. Held on campus with industrial mentors in attendance. Final discussion and evaluation of projects.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: CHEM+112
CHEM 250 - Formerly 25 - Organic Chemistry I (4)
A systematic survey of structure, nomenclature, and reactions of common functional groups and carbon compounds. Topics include stereochemistry, chirality, stereoisomerism, nucleophilic substitution and elimination, insertions, radical processes, oxidation-reduction and acid-base equilibria. Includes spectroscopic analysis. Discusses applications to systems of biological significance.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+7 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
CHEM 350 - Formerly 26 - Organic Chemistry II (4)
A continuing systematic study of organic reactions organized on the basis of reaction mechanisms. Topics include aromaticity, carbonyls, carboxyls, amines, orbital symmetry controlled processes, and organic synthesis. Includes spectroscopic analysis. Discusses classes of compounds of biological significance.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM+25 Offered spring semester.
CHEM 340 - Formerly 27 - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (3)
A systematic study of modern inorganic chemistry beginning with the chemistry of the main group elements. Topics include periodic trends and chemical relationships and unusual bonding interactions. Focuses on the chemistry of the transition elements, including stereochemistry and isomerism, bonding (crystal and ligand field theory), magnetic and spectroscopic properties, metal-metal bonds, metal clusters, organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: CHEM+25 Offered fall semester.
CHEM 290 - Formerly 29 - FOUNDATIONS OF CHEMISTRY/ BIOCHEMISTRY RESEARCH (2)
Foundations of Chemistry/Biochemistry Research (2 credits) This laboratory/studio course introduces declared and potential science majors to the research methods and programs of faculty in the department of chemistry. Topics include literature searches, strategies for reading research articles, and analytical and instrumental techniques for laboratory research. Students will spend the majority of time participating in two of the following research projects: synthesis and characterization of osmium carbonyl clusters, interactions between metal ions and nucleic acid models, chemistry of model atmospheric aerosols with ozone, and molecular mechanisms of gene silencing.
Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority will be given to sophomore and first-year students who intend to pursue science degrees, especially in chemistry, biochemistry, environmental science or physics. Prerequisite: CHEM+25, or CHEM 150 - Formerly 6 - /6A with a grade of B or better, or instructor's signature . (This course may be substituted for CHEM+106 as the prerequisite for Chemistry Research, CHEM+129.)
CHEM 101 - Formerly 3 - Chemistry and the Environment (4)
A non-major course designed to address environmental issues from a chemical perspective and to achieve a chemical literacy necessary to critique such issues. Prior background in chemistry is not required.
Meets: Four hours class Offered fall semester.
CHEM 291 - Formerly 30 - Co-op Work I (4)
Each student is located in a chemical or pharmaceutical company under the direct supervision of an industrial "mentor" for a minimum of 10 weeks. The exact projects vary but are usually at the technician level. Precise objectives are arranged in each individual case by the mentor and the co-op director. Final reports and evaluations are required. At least one on-site visit is made by the co-op director.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Admission to the co-op program Offered in summer.
CHEM 104 - Formerly 4 - Toxic Chemicals: Great Challenges in Environ. Science (4)
This introductory course will research and discuss the challenges associated with detecting, evaluating and remediating the pollution of toxic chemicals in our environment. We will address these environmental challenges from a chemical perspective to understand the risks of water and air pollution, and to evaluate remediation strategies. This course includes a hands-on field/laboratory research project to gain proficiency designing, conducting and communicating scientific research.
Prior background in chemistry is not required. Meets: One hour class and three hour lab. Offered alternate spring semesters. Same as: ESS+4
Fulfills: BNS, Q
CHEM 103 - Formerly 5 - Turning Green: An Intro. to Green Materials & Alternatives (4)
This introductory course focused on the challenges involved with manufacturing and using materials and chemicals in the modern world. Substances ranging from adhesives to asphalt, fibers to food, cars to clothes, carpets to cosmetics, diapers to drugs, inks to insecticides, perfumes to pesticides, pharmaceuticals to plastics, wood to water treatment chemicals and many others are based on the synthesis, processing, formulation, use and eventual disposal or recycling of chemical entities. Thus an understanding of the basis for the environmentally sound production of diverse chemicals and materials as well as emerging alternative processes is vital for the sustainable and safe use of items made from chemicals. In this course we will explore, describe and evaluate the myriad ways in which selected, important chemicals and materials are made and used as we ask, how can these processes and products become benign by design, eco-effective and "green"?
Prior background in chemistry is not required. Meets: Four hours. Offered Fall Semester alternate years.
Fulfills: BNS
CHEM 150 - Formerly 6 - Principles of Chemistry I (4)
An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry as a quantitative science, including inorganic reactions, properties of gases, liquids, and solids, thermochemistry, atomic theory, and nuclear chemistry. Appropriate for those with little or no background in chemistry.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
CHEM 151 - Formerly 6A - Principles of Chemistry I, Advanced Section (4)
A special section of CHEM+6 for students who have the ability and necessary background to work at an advanced level. Covers topics in CHEM+6 as necessary but in more depth and adds some enrichment topics. All students, regardless of background and without testing at Drew, enter CHEM+6. Placement in CHEM+6A is determined on basis of placement test and in consultation with instructor of course.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Signature of instructor required for registration. Corequisite: CHEM+6ALCHEM+6L Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
CHEM 160 - Formerly 7 - Principles of Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of CHEM 150 - Formerly 6 - /6A covering the structure of solids, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibria, electrochemistry, and the principles of descriptive inorganic chemistry, including the transition metals.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM 150 - Formerly 6 - /6A Corequisite: CHEM+7LCHEM+7AL Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q

CHIN

CHIN 101 - Formerly 1 - Beginning Chinese I (4)
An introduction to spoken and written Chinese. Language laboratory required.
Corequisite: CHIN+3. Offered fall semester.
CHIN 301 - Formerly 101 - Modern Chinese Society (4)
Advanced training in listening comprehension and oral expression through study of modern Chinese society. Writing skills will be developed through critical essays on readings.
Offered fall semester in alternate years.
CHIN 310 - Formerly 102 - Advanced Chinese Reading (4)
This is a second-semester course for the third-year of Chinese. It focuses on students' ability to read authentic Chinese texts. Other aspects of the language learning, such as speaking, character acquisition, writing and translation are also included.
Prerequisite: CHIN+101 Offered spring semester.
CHIN 381 - Formerly 110A - Advanced intensive speaking Chinese (4)
An intensive course in spoken Mandarin. Drills and exercises on pronunciation, intonation, and prosody of Standard Mandarin (putonghua). Advanced sentence patterns and grammar, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions of spoken Chinese. Maximum enrollment of five students per section. Five 120-minute classes weekly for four weeks. Conducted in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN+100
CHIN 382 - Formerly 110B - Intensive Chinese: Listening and Understanding (4)
An intensive course in the comprehension of Mandarin. Listening drills will feature situational Chinese spoken at a natural pace, both with and without regional accents. Some listening exercises will use popular and traditional songs, public announcements, radio and television broadcasts. Maximum enrollment of five students per section. Five 120-minute classes weekly for four weeks. Conducted in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN+100
CHIN 354 - Formerly 111 - Selected Topics in Classical Chinese Literature (4)
Examination of the Chinese tradition in literature, culture and thought through critical study of classical texts in English translation. Subject matter may include selections from the genres of poetry, philosophical discourse, drama, tales, and the classical novel. Critical essay required of students.
[CAP] Capstone May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Offered fall semester in even numbered years.
Fulfills: WM
CHIN 350 - Formerly 112 - Selected Topics in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (4)
Chinese literature, cinema, and drama of the twentieth century, a time when China faced western challenges to its national identity and cultural tradition. Texts of the twentieth century are distinctively modern, covering such issues as westernization and tradition, revolution, family restructuring and women's role in society.
Course may be repeated. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
CHIN 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Chinese (2-4)
A course for students who wish to continue the study of Chinese at an advanced level.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
CHIN 102 - Formerly 2 - Beginning Chinese II (4)
An introduction to spoken and written Chinese. Language laboratory required.
Prerequisite: CHIN+1 Offered spring semester.
CHIN 105 - Formerly 3 - Introduction to Chinese Character Writing I (2)
Chinese character-based exercise session to facilitate CHIN+1.
Corequisite: CHIN+1
CHIN 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Chinese I (4)
Intermediate spoken and written Chinese. Language laboratory required.
Prerequisite: CHIN+2 or equivalent Offered fall semester.
CHIN 281 - Formerly 31A - Intermediate Intensive Speaking Chinese (4)
An intensive course in spoken Mandarin. Drills and exercises on pronunciation, intonation, and prosody of Standard Mandarin (putonghua). Intermediate sentence patterns and grammar, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions of spoken Chinese. Maximum enrollment of five students per section. Five 120-minute classes weekly for four weeks. Conducted in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN+2
CHIN 282 - Formerly 31B - Intensive Chinese: Listening and Understanding (4)
An intensive course in the comprehension of Mandarin. Listening drills will feature situational Chinese spoken at a natural pace, both with and without regional accents. Some listening exercises will use popular and traditional songs, public announcements, radio and television broadcasts. Maximum enrollment of five students per section. Five 120-minute classes weekly for four weeks. Conducted Mostly in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN+2
CHIN 106 - Formerly 4 - Introduction to Chinese Character Writing II (2)
Chinese character-based exercise session to facilitate CHIN+2.
Corequisite: CHIN+2.
CHIN 250 - Formerly 40 - Topics in Chinese Culture (4)
An interdisciplinary and comparative introduction to important elements of both traditional and modern Chinese culture, including history, language, literature, art, philosophy/religion, family/marriage, and science/technology/medicine.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: DIT, BI
CHIN 202 - Formerly 50 - Intermediate Chinese II (4)
This course is designed for students who have completed Chinese 30 and intend to finish two years of language training. The course emphasizes speaking, vocabulary building, and the development of reading and translating skills. Teaching materials will include a textbook and newspaper/magazine articles.
Prerequisite: CHIN+30 or equivalent. Offered spring semester.
CHIN 299 - Formerly 99 - Chinese Across the Curriculum (2)
Foreign Languages across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Prerequisite: CHIN+30 or equivalent and signature of language instructor.

CLAS - Formerly CL

CLAS 312 - Formerly CL 120 - Classical Morality & Religious Ethics From Plato to Machiavelli (4)
The course provides a history of classical moral thinking, both philosophical and theological, in the West by tracing this thought through Greek, Roman, and Christian philosophers, theologians, historians, dramatists, and Italian Renaissance Republicans. We will pay particular attention to how this intellectual history, found in philosophers and theologians, interacts with popular classical morality and piety as found in classical historians and dramatists, medieval morality dramatists, and biography. Topics to be covered will include but not be limited to: the nature of morality, moral realism, moral virtue, the relationship between tragedy and virtue, the goal of happiness and inner peace in the face of adversity, the interaction of religion and morality, love, marriage, friendship, sexual relations, raising children, and political ethics. The course will conclude with an overview of the recent revival of classical morality in religious and philosophical ethics.
Same as: REL+120. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
CLAS 310 - Formerly CL 128 - Current Controversies in Classics (2)
This course investigates selected topics in Classics, chosen to fit students' interests. Students read recent works presenting different views of a current issue in the field. We evaluate the ancient sources (the evidence), scholars' reasoning about them, the state of the current debate, and its relevance to broader interests in the humanities and contemporary society. Through study of different types of scholarly writing, and regular writing of their own, students enter into the scholarly conversation in the field. Topics include, for example: ancient sexuality; multiculturalism and minorities; the fall of Rome; paganism compared with Christianity; new archaeological finds.
Required for all majors, except those writing an Honors thesis in the department. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Meets: Meets: One hour per week. Recommended: Maximum enrollment: 10. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status; Classics or Classical Studies major, Classical Studies minor, or completion of two Classics courses. With signature of instructor, open to juniors and seniors who have taken one Classics course. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WM
CLAS 336 - Formerly CL 136 - Foundations of the European Intellectual Tradition (4)
A survey of Western thought from the earliest Greek thinkers through the Renaissance, with emphasis upon the rise of a spirit of free inquiry, the growth of humanism and secularism, and debates between science and religion, tradition and innovation. Considered in their social contexts are the pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Plato and Aristotle, Stoics and Epicureans, early Christians, and representatives of medieval scholasticism and Renaissance humanism.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: HIST+136
Fulfills: BH
CLAS 340 - Formerly CL 140 - Archaeological Field Study (4)
This summer field course introduces students to archaeological field methods, including survey, excavation, and artifact recovery and processing. Instruction is through participation in an ongoing research project. This course is an intensive three-to-four-week archaeological field school run by the Classics Department. Students participate actively in the excavation of a classical site, in addition to attending lectures and participating in site visits. Students will be introduced to the material culture of the region in which the excavation occurs. Students must be prepared for fairly strenuous outdoor physical activity in hot weather.
Signature of the program director is required for registration. Enrollment in the course is subject to application to the International and Off-Campus Programs Office. Signature of instructor required for registration. Recommended: Relevant coursework prior to the field school is recommended though not required. Offered annually.
CLAS 300 - Formerly CL 150 - Independent Study (2-4)
Independent work in classics, chosen to meet students' special interests, in history, literature, classical civilization, or archaeology. Conducted as a tutorial with weekly meetings, written and oral reports.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: One classics course at the intermediate level and permission of instructor Offered every fall and spring semester.
CLAS 302 - Formerly CL 165 - Greek and Roman Religions (4)
An introduction to the religious thought and practices of the ancient Greeks, Romans, and (in this context) the early Christians. Topics include ritual, worship, and sacrifice; beliefs about the underworld and afterlife; the ancient mystery cults and the rise of Christianity; philosophical challenges to religion; the conflict of paganism and Christianity. Emphasis is placed on original literary, artistic, and archaeological sources.
Prerequisite: A previous Classics course (preferably CLAS - Formerly CL+25) or a previous REL course. Offering to be determined. Same as: REL+165
Fulfills: BH
CLAS 230 - Formerly CL 20 - The History of Ancient Greece (4)
An introduction to the history of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, including its artistic, social, economic, religious, military, and political developments, and the evolution of the basic concepts that have influenced Western thought. Special attention is given to original sources, with readings from the Greek historians and consideration of archaeology.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. Same as: HIST+20
Fulfills: DIT, BH
CLAS 232 - Formerly CL 21 - The History of Ancient Rome (4)
An introduction to Roman history, covering the rise of Rome, Roman imperialism, social stresses, the transition from Republic to Empire, imperial civilization, the rise of Christianity, and the decline of the Roman Empire.
Offering varies. Same as: HIST+21
Fulfills: BH, DIT
CLAS 250 - Formerly CL 22 - Classical Literature in Translation (4)
Reading, analysis, and interpretation of selected classics of Greek and Roman literature, including Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, and representative selections from comedy, love-poetry, and Athenian tragedy. Provides an introduction to ancient life and thought and builds a foundation for the study of other literatures that draw heavily on the classical tradition.
May be repeated for credit with permission of the department as the emphasis of the course varies. Offering varies.
Fulfills: WI, BH
CLAS 240 - Formerly CL 24 - Archaeology of Greece and Rome (4)
An introduction to the material culture of the Greek and Roman worlds, including the main periods and styles of pottery, vase painting, sculpture, and other arts, as well as cities, sanctuaries, and architectural forms, from the Aegean Bronze Age to the Roman Empire. While furnishing an overview of the ancient classical world, the course considers what art and archaeology can tell us about civilization and society and about issues such as public and private, sacred and profane, male and female.
Offering varies.
CLAS 215 - Formerly CL 25 - Classical Mythology (4)
A study of Greek and Roman myth and legend in literature and art, with an exploration of the basic meaning of myth and its nature and function in various cultures. Considers the Indo-European and Near Eastern sources of classical myths as well as their influence in later European art and literature.
Offered spring semester annually.
Fulfills: BH
CLAS 270 - Formerly CL 27 - Society and Family in Ancient Greece and Rome (4)
An examination of the lives of individuals in Classical Antiquity, both men and women in their public and private social lives. Considers gender roles, education, lifecycle, moral values, sexuality, working conditions, slavery, entertainments, religious activity, magic, medicine, and law. Makes use of a variety of sources from literature, inscriptions, art, and archaeology.
Offering to be determined.
CLAS 260 - Formerly CL 28 - Classical Civilization: Selected Topics (2-4)
Study of selected topics from Greek and Roman civilization, literature and archaeology. Topics change from year to year and include the Trojan War; the Golden Age of Athens; Rome of Caesar and Augustus; sport and spectacle in Greece and Rome; Alexander the Great; classics and computers; classics in cinema; Greek and Latin roots of English.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Not open to students who have taken two previous classics (CL) courses; they should register for CLAS 310 - Formerly CL 128 -. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, WI
CLAS 400 - Formerly CL AA1 - Research Project in Classics (4)
An independent research project chosen to meet students' special interests in history, literature, civilization, or archaeology of the ancient world. Students work closely with department faculty to frame a question and investigate it using ancient sources and recent critical methods. Interdisciplinary work is encouraged, as well as a sense of the topics relevance to the present. The capstone course for Classics and Classical Studies majors in their Senior year. Required of all majors except those completing an Honors thesis.
[CAP] Capstone. For Classics and Classical Studies majors in their Senior year. Prerequisite: CLAS - Formerly CL+128 Offered every fall and spring.

CMHR

CMHR 100 - Formerly 1 - The Common Hour (1)
Meeting one hour each week during the fall and spring of the first year, the Common Hour creates a shared experience for the entire first -year class. Throughout the Common Hour, students work with advanced undergraduate peer mentors, one of whom is assigned to each seminar group. Common Hour activities include speakers, academic planning and advising activities, career planning seminars, and opportunities to meet regularly in small groups with the peer mentors. The Common Hour is graded on a pass/no credit basis. Completion of DONUT (Drew On-line Network User Training) and Library Tutorial Assessment is required as part of the Common Hour.
The Common Hour will be graded on a pass/no credit basis. Completion of DoNUT (Drew On-line Network User Training) is required as part of the fall Common Hour. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Corequisite: CSEM+1
CMHR 102 - Formerly 2 - The Common Hour (1)
Meeting one hour each week during the fall and spring of the first year, the Common Hour creates a shared experience for the entire first -year class. Throughout the Common Hour, students work with advanced undergraduate peer mentors, one of whom is assigned to each seminar group. Common Hour activities include speakers, academic planning and advising activities, career planning seminars, and opportunities to meet regularly in small groups with the peer mentors. The Common Hour is graded on a pass/no credit basis. Completion of DONUT (Drew On-line Network User Training) and Library Tutorial Assessment is required as part of the Common Hour.
The Common Hour will be graded on a pass/no credit basis. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.

CSCI

CSCI 115 - Formerly 1 - Introduction to Computers and Computing (4)
An introduction to problem solving with computers. Tools for problem solving include the Alice 3D Authoring System, Adobe Flash and ActionScript, and a graphical application building environment, such as Visual Basic for Applications.
Meets: Three 50-minute class meetings and one 75-minute laboratory weekly. Recommended: The department strongly recommends this course for all students planning to study Computer Science. CSCI 115 - Formerly 1 - is also the recommended course for students who seek a general education course in the field and do not expect to take additional courses.
CSCI 210 - Formerly 10 - Human Interaction with Technology and Information (4)
A study of how people perceive technology and the ways in which they consume and create information. An introduction to the practice of designing technology with careful consideration for its users. No programming experience is required prior to taking this course. Meets: weekly for at least 150 minutes.
Offered fall and spring semesters.
CSCI 320 - Formerly 100 - Systems Programming and Tools (4)
Development of software in the C programming language. User-functionality of the UNIX operating system. Architecture of the UNIX operating system from a programmer's perspective. Machine-level representation of data; assembly-level machine organization. Tools for large-scale software engineering including integrated development environments and code versioning systems.
Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+2
CSCI 370 - Formerly 101 - Algorithm Analysis and Computability (4)
Methods for the analysis of time and space efficiency, comparison of brute-force algorithms with divide-and-conquer algorithms, tree algorithms, graph algorithms, string algorithms, dynamic programming, and greedy methods. An introduction to NP-completeness and intractability. Turing machines, Church's thesis, determinism and non-determinism, unsolvability and reducibility. Search and constraint satisfaction.
Meets: weekly for three 65-minute periods Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+25 and C- or better in CSCI+23 Offered spring semester.
CSCI 325 - Formerly 124 - Operating Systems (4)
The fundamentals of operating systems design and implementation. Basic structure; synchronization and communication mechanisms; implementation of processes, process management, scheduling, and protection; memory organization and management; file systems; machine-level representation of data; assembly-level machine organization; functional organization of computers.
Meets: 150 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+100. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
CSCI 330 - Formerly 130 - Information Management (4)
Theory and practice of information storage, management and retrieval, emphasizing relational database management systems. Case studies of small-scale (personal computing) and large-scale (corporate records on distributed systems) applications. Data modeling, database design and management, query processing, data integrity, and security. Legal and social contexts of data management; the responsibility of professionals to understand requirements, risks, and liabilities.
Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+2 and CSCI+10.
CSCI 340 - Formerly 140 - Software Engineering (4)
Software design; using APIs; software tools and environments; software processes; software requirements and specifications; software validation; software evolution; software project management; methods and tools of working in teams; social context of computing; professional and ethical responsibilities; risks and liabilities of computer-based systems.
Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+3, CSCI+10, and CSCI+100.
CSCI 350 - Formerly 150 - Net-centric Computing (4)
Communication and networking; the social context of computing; intellectual property; network security; the web as an example of client-server computing; building web applications; network management; compression and decompression; wireless and mobile computing; virtual machines; knowledge representation and reasoning. Meets: weekly for at least 150 minutes.
Prerequisite: CSCI+23 and C- or better in MATH+3, CSCI+10, and CSCI+100.
CSCI 400 - Formerly 160 - Applications of Computing to Other Disciplines (4)
Much of computer science is practiced through application of computing to other disciplines. In this capstone course, the instructor and students will develop a software solution to a problem arising in another field. Application areas include, but are not limited to finance, economics, biology, and law. We will explore strategies for learning in and contributing to inter-disciplinary teams, customer-client communication; software design, requirements, specification, and project management. Meets weekly for at least 150 minutes.
[CAP] Capstone Prerequisite: CSCI+23, CSCI+25, and C- or better in MATH+3, CSCI+10, and CSCI+100.
CSCI 390 - Formerly 198 - Topics in Computer Science (4)
Topics to be determined by current events in computing and opportunities presented by visiting faculty, etc. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Meets: weekly for at least 150 minutes.
Course may be repeated. Meets: Meets: weekly for at least 150 minutes. Prerequisite: Dependent on topic. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
CSCI 300 - Formerly 199 - Independent Study in Computer Science (1-4)
An independent investigation of a topic selected in conference with the instructor and approved by the department. Admission by petition to or invitation from the department.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Prerequisite: Signature of the department. Offered every semester.
CSCI 117 - Formerly 1A - Introduction to Computers and Computing (Scripting Focus) (4)
An introduction to problem solving with computers. Tools for problem solving include at least one scripting language, Microsoft Excel and a graphical application building environment such as visual basics for applications.
CSCI+1A is an appropriate course for students who seek a general education course computer science. Meets: 150 minutes weekly. Recommended: The department strongly recommends CSCI 115 - Formerly 1 - 15 - Formerly 1 - or CSCI 115 - Formerly 1 - 15 - Formerly 1 - A for all students planning to study Computer Science.
Fulfills: Q
CSCI 151 - Formerly 2 - Object Oriented Programming (4)
Designing, writing, and testing structured computer programs. Decomposing problems; writing function definitions; conditional and iterative control constructs; using class libraries. Problem-solving through programming with classes and vectors; algorithm correctness; recursion. Java will be the language of instruction. Meets: three times weekly for 65 minutes plus once a week for a 75 minute laboratory.
Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+1 or CSCI+1A. Offered every semester. Same as: MAT+868
Fulfills: Q
CSCI 220 - Formerly 23 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (4)
Mathematics central to the study of computer science. Topics include: set theory, logic, induction, combinatorics, number theory, graph theory, sequences and series, matrices, and recurrence relations.
Meets: weekly for three 65-minute periods Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+1. Offered fall semester
CSCI 230 - Formerly 25 - Data Structures (4)
Introduction to the study of abstract data types and the analysis of algorithms. Students will write Java applications using data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, multidimensional arrays, trees, sets, maps, and heaps.
Meets: weekly for three 65-minute periods, with an additional weekly 75-minute laboratory. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+2. Offered spring semester.
CSCI 270 - Formerly 70 - Computing Technology, Society and Culture (4)
This course will survey the principal computing technologies that are in use today or on the horizon, then investigate individual topics in more technical and cultural depth. Topics will vary in light of new developments, and could include blogging, RFID, intelligent systems, GPS, data mining, Google, and eBay. Other aspects of computing technology, society, and culture to be addressed will include legal and political issues such as regulation, jurisdiction, internationalization, and standardization, and broader questions such as how and why new computing technologies are developed and accepted.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Given to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Offered fall semester.
CSCI 190 - Formerly 8 - Introductory Topics in Information Technology (4)
Topics to be determined by current events in computing and opportunities presented by visiting faculty, etc.
Course may be repeated.

CSEM

CSEM 100 - Formerly 1 - College Seminar: (2)
Taken by all entering students in their first semester, the College Seminar emphasizes critical inquiry, analytical and creative thinking, critical reading, intellectual engagement with faculty and peers, and writing to learn. Designed by each faculty member around a topic of his or her choice, the seminars are lively discussion classes in which students begin to acquire, to develop and to practice the skills associated with inquiry in the liberal arts. The seminars also begin to introduce students to appropriate uses of information from academic and non-academic sources.
Corequisite: CMHR+1
CSEM 102 - Formerly 2 - College Seminar II (4)
Taken by transfer students who enter with first-year student standing and by entering first-year students who defer admission to the spring, College Seminar II combines the learning goals of the College Seminar and College Writing in a single 4-credit course. Like the College Seminar, the course emphasizes critical inquiry, analytical and creative thinking, critical reading, intellectual engagement with faculty and peers, and writing to learn. At the same time, it helps students to develop the essential skills taught in College Writing -- their critical reading, writing, and research skills, and it strengthens all aspects of the writing process from invention to editing. Designed by a faculty member around a topic of his or her choice, the seminar is a lively discussion class in which students begin to acquire, to develop and to practice the skills associated with inquiry in the liberal arts. The seminar also begins to introduce students to appropriate uses of information from academic and non-academic sources.
Fulfills the College Seminar and College Writing requirements for General Education. Offered Spring Semesters.

WRTG - Formerly CWRTG

WRTG 103 - Formerly CWRTG 1 - College Writing (2)
College Writing extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and explore the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. Students are introduced to academic research. Students who earn a C- or above will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement; all others must enroll in in the Spring.
WRTG 102 - Formerly CWRTG 1A - College Writing: Fundamentals (2)
College Writing Fundamentals extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled, and also includes small group, instructor-led recitation sessions to provide additional instruction and support for students as they draft and revise their papers. In this course, students explore and practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and analyze the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. Students who take in the Fall must register for in the Spring.
Enrollment limit: College Writing Plus is capped at 12 students to ensure opportunity for one-on-one work.
WRTG 104 - Formerly CWRTG 1B - College Writing: Advanced (2)
College Writing Advanced extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled. Ideal for students who have taken AP or honors courses in high school, this course challenges students to practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education by reading and responding to academic texts. By exploring the style, vocabulary, and structure of various academic texts, they develop the flexibility to move among academic discourse communities. Students are introduced to academic research. Students who earn a C- or above will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement; all others must enroll in in the Spring.
WRTG 115 - Formerly CWRTG 2A - College Writing II (2)
In College Writing 2, students continue to practice and develop their writing skills. This course includes small group, instructor-led recitation sessions to provide additional instruction and support for students as they draft and revise their papers. College Writing 2 challenges students to practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education by reading and responding to academic texts. By exploring the style, vocabulary, and structure of these academic texts, they develop the flexibility to move among academic discourse communities. Students are introduced to academic research. Students who pass will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement. All others must re-enroll in in the Fall of their sophomore year.
WRTG 101 - Formerly CWRTG 3 - College Writing: ESOL (4)
College Writing 101 is a writing class for speakers of other languages. extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled, and also includes small group work with trained writing fellows. The writing fellows provide additional instruction and support for students as they draft and revise their papers. In this course, students explore and practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and analyze the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. This course pays special attention to the distinct needs of ESOL learners. Students who take in the Fall must register for in the Spring.
WRTG 110 - Formerly CWRTG AA1 - College Writing II: ESOL (4)
In College Writing 2 for ESOL, students continue to practice and develop advanced literacy skills. Like , this course includes small group work with trained writing fellows. College Writing 2 for ESOL challenges students to practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education by reading and responding to academic texts. By exploring the style, vocabulary, and structure of various academic texts, they develop the flexibility to move among academic discourse communities. Students are introduced to academic research. This course pays special attention to the distinct needs of ESOL learners. Students who pass will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement. All others must re-enroll in in the Fall of their sophomore year.

DANC - Formerly DAN

DANC 322 - Formerly DAN 123 - Choreography and Performance Studies (4)
Advanced technical composition and theoretical exploration through the preparation and performance of several choreographed pieces as part of the Theatre Arts Department's dance concert at the end of the semester. Will require the development of extensive preproduction research and performance preparation work in conjunction with choreographed pieces in the concert.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: DANC - Formerly DAN+2 or 24.
DANC 350 - Formerly DAN 168 - Special Topics in Dance: (2-4)
Study in dance related subjects at the Intermediate or Advanced level. Topics could include: Styles (jazz, tap, ballet etc.), dance on film, appreciation and critique, history of dance.
Course may be repeated as topic changes. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined. Same as: DANC - Formerly DAN+68
DANC 300 - Formerly DAN 195 - Independent Study in Dance (1-4)
A tutorial course with meetings by arrangement and written reports, stressing independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the instructor.
Amount of credit established at registration. Students who wish to pursue independent study in dance must petition the program director and instructor. Prerequisite: DANC - Formerly DAN+123. Offered every semester.
DANC 101 - Formerly DAN 2 - Beginning Movement Studies (2)
An exploration of dance technique through several current movement styles. Focuses on alignment, strength, and flexibility. Students develop the basic body connections necessary to execute more advanced movement sequences, while fostering body awareness and integration.
Enrollment priority: theatre majors and minors and dance minors. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BA
DANC 220 - Formerly DAN 24 - Movement for the Musical Stage (2)
An exploration of various movement and dance styles utilized in musical theatre. The first half of the semester will focus on the technique of Jazz dance, exposing students to a specific anatomical use particular to that style and combinations influenced by the historical jazz genre. Among the other styles that may be included in the remainder of the semester are ballroom, swing, and tap.
May be repeated once for credit. Enrollment priority: theatre majors and minors and dance minors. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BA
DANC 201 - Formerly DAN 62 - Intermediate Movement Studies (2)
A continuation of the movement explorations of DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DAN+2 for students who want to develop their physical awareness, flexibility, and strength further as well as their awareness and experience of different dance techniques. Students will be challenged to achieve a high level of technical execution. They will also be required to participate in the Theatre Arts Department's dance concert at the end of the semester and to view selected videos on different dance techniques and submit written analyses.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: theatre majors and minors and dance minors. Prerequisite: DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DAN+2 Offered spring semester.
DANC 250 - Formerly DAN 68 - Special Topics in Dance: (2-4)
Study in dance related subjects at the Intermediate or Advanced level. Topics could include: Styles (jazz, tap, ballet etc.), dance on film, appreciation and critique, history of dance.
Course may be repeated as the topic changes. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined. Same as: DANC - Formerly DAN+168

DIS

DIS 201 - Formerly 10 - Drew International Seminar (4)
On site course for the Drew International Seminar. Exploration of the selected seminar site through lectures, site visits, and individual and group meetings with members of the host culture. Includes an individual research project.
Course may fill a distribution, major, or minor requirement. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Registration is limited to students who have been admitted to the seminar through the DIS application process. Prerequisite: Appropriate pre-departure course.

DNUT

DNUT 1 - DREW NETWORK USER TRAINING
Drew (online) Network User Training is designed to instruct new students in all aspects of computing services at Drew. This course is part of the credit-bearing College Seminar Common Hour and is required of all incoming Drew students who participate in the computer initiative (this includes all entering first-year students). The course itself does not occur at the time of the Common Hour, but the assessments will be included in the Common Hour grade. Students may take this course in a self-paced online format, or may register for any of the classroom sections. This course covers three teaching units: Unit 1: Using and Understanding the Drew Network, Unit 2: Drew-Specific Applications & Programs, and Unit 3: Computer Maintenance. Students will take an assessment after each unit, and a score of 90% is required on each in order to receive credit for the course. The course, if taken in a classroom setting, lasts for three weeks. Students will have until the last day of classes in the

ECON

ECON 301 - Formerly 102 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (4)
A theoretical analysis of resource allocation in a market economy. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, production, and costs; decision making under various market conditions; general equilibrium and welfare economics.
Student must earn a grade of C or better in this course to satisfy the major requirements. Recommended: MATH 115 - Formerly 2 - or 7 or 8 or 16 Prerequisite: ECON+5 or equivalent Every semester.
Fulfills: Q
ECON 302 - Formerly 103 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (4)
A study of the determinants of the level of income, employment, and prices as seen in competing theoretical frameworks. Includes an analysis of inflation and unemployment, their causes, costs, and policy options; the sources of instability in a market economy; debates on policy activism; prospects for the control of aggregate demand.
Student must earn a C or better in this course to satisfy the major requirements. Recommended: MATH 115 - Formerly 2 - or 7 or 8 or 16 Prerequisite: ECON+6 or equivalent. Every semester.
ECON 303 - Formerly 104 - Economic Methodology And Introductory Econometrics (4)
This course studies empirical economic research, especially focused on the classical linear regression model and how to proceed with econometric analysis when some assumptions of the classical model do not hold. It examines sampling, statistical theory and hypothesis testing. This course also examines criticisms of and alternatives to common econometric methodologies.
Students are expected to take this course in their second or third year. Prerequisite: ECON+5, 6, and MATH+3 or 129. Spring Semester.
ECON 311 - Formerly 111 - Public Finance Economics (4)
A consideration of the role of the public sector in the U.S. economy. Topics include the use of public expenditure analysis to assess specific federal programs; the theories of market failure and public goods; analysis of externalities; public choice economics; the incidence of major types of taxes; prospects for tax reform; and problems of deficit finance.
Prerequisite: ECON+102 or equivalent. Offered annually.
ECON 316 - Formerly 112 - History of Economic Thought (4)
A consideration of the philosophical basis, historical context, and development of economic thinking. Focuses on pre-20th-century economists-the Mercantilists, the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, and early neoclassical economists. Some attention given to later economists and schools of thought as continuations and modifications of earlier ideas in economics.
Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing and one course in economics Offered alternate years.
ECON 317 - Formerly 117 - Contemporary Political Economy (4)
A consideration of the varying interpretations by present-day economists of the current state of the U.S. economy and of the challenges it faces in the 21st century. Topics include the historical origins and major ideas of such contemporary schools of economic thought as neo-conservatism, post-Keynesian liberalism, and ecological/humanistic economics.
Open only to students with sophomore or higher standing Prerequisite: ECON+5 and 6 Offered annually.
Fulfills: WI
ECON 338 - Formerly 118 - Industrial Organization and Public Policy Toward Business (4)
An analysis of the present structure of industry in the United States, the theory of monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition, and antitrust policy, i.e., government policies to preserve competition. Focuses on recent antitrust cases in the latter half of the course.
Prerequisite: ECON+5, 6, and 102. Offered alternate years.
ECON 320 - Formerly 119 - Money and Banking (4)
An introduction to the theory of money and banking. Special consideration is given to the structure and functioning of the commercial banking system and the effectiveness of monetary policy.
Prerequisite: ECON+103 or equivalent. Offered annually.
ECON 321 - Formerly 120 - Corporate Finance (4)
A study of selected problems and issues in the field of finance. Topics include the use of financial statements, ratio analysis and the valuation of assets, especially derivatives (e.g., futures and options).
Prerequisite: ECON+102. Offered annually. Same as: BST - Formerly BUS+120
ECON 324 - Formerly 124 - International Trade (4)
A study of international trade theory, including the classical works (Ricardian, Hecksher-Ohlin, specific factors model, factor-price equalization, and growth models) along with a consideration of trade restrictions, i.e., tariffs and quotas. Explores contemporary patterns of trade encompassing such issues as increasing returns, imperfect competition, technology transfer, market structures, industrial policies, and international factor movements. Analyzes these issues from the perspective of a large versus a small economy and from a developed versus a developing economy.
Prerequisite: ECON+102 and 103. Offered alternate years.
ECON 325 - Formerly 125 - International Finance (4)
An exploration of the various theories of international finance. Includes a practical introduction to foreign exchange markets (forward markets, options, and futures)-how they work, how they are used, and how to understand published information about these markets. Explores the relationship between domestic money markets and international money markets in a theoretical context. Discusses the purchasing power parity relationship and the evolution of the contemporary international monetary system.
Prerequisite: ECON+124. Offered alternate years.
ECON 350 - Formerly 129 - Selected Topics in Economics (4)
Topics determined by department. Recent topics have included economics of racism, government regulation of industry, the microeconomics of macroeconomics, and workplace democracy.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: ECON+26 Offering to be determined.
ECON 330 - Formerly 130 - Topics in Economics and the Environment (4)
A consideration of specific topics pertaining to the relationship of economic activities and the natural environment. Generally, one major topic will be considered each time the course is offered. Possible topics include: sustainable development; global warming and peak oil; carbon trading, taxation and subsidies as environmental policies; and consumption, well-being, the economy and the environment.
May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: ECON+5 and one additional Economics course or one Environmental Studies course, or permission of the instructor. Fall 2008 and ,thereafter, annually. Same as: ESS+130
Fulfills: BI
ECON 314 - Formerly 134 - American Economic Development (4)
A topical survey of the economic history of the United States from its establishment as a collection of British Colonies to its emergence as the world's leading industrial nation. The course explores the nature, causes, and consequences of America's economic growth and development and the institutional transformations that accompanied its rise to world industrial supremacy in the middle of the 20th century. Through the study of American economic development from a variety of theoretical and multidisciplinary paradigms, students will acquire critical, comparative and historical perspectives on contemporary economic theory, issues, policies, and debates. Through exposure to, engagement with, and oral and written critical reflections on the scholarly literature in economic, business, and labor history and in historical political economy, students will develop the analytical and writing skills that will enable them to understand, produce, and present work in the field of American econom
Prerequisite: ECON+102 or 103. Offered annually.
Fulfills: WM
ECON 315 - Formerly 136 - Political Economy of Race, Class, and Gender (4)
A study of race, class, and gender using the political economic approach to the study of economics. The course will investigate the impact of introducing the categories of race, class, and gender into political economic theory and will also undertake some empirical analyses of the roles of race, class, and gender in producing economic outcomes for minorities and majorities in the U.S.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing and one course in Economics. Offered alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, DUS
ECON 337 - Formerly 137 - Seminar in Labor Economics (4)
This course studies contemporary issues in labor markets. Students read, analyze and discuss journal articles about selected topics in labor economics. Topics, which will vary depending on current economic conditions, may include: unemployment, discrimination, welfare programs, minimum wage, Social Security, poverty.
Prerequisite: ECON+102 and ECON+104. Offered in Spring 2008 and thereafter in the fall semester in odd-numbered years.
ECON 318 - Formerly 138 - Gender and Globalization (4)
In this class we will examine how scholars have understood and made sense of how gender issues intersect with economic globalization. Two ways in which economic globalization is manifest is through changes in trade in goods and services, and migration. We will focus on these two aspects of economic globalization. As we will discover through the readings and our discussions, scholars from a range of disciplines/theoretical frameworks, (eg economics, history, cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, political science, feminist, post-colonial theory), have contributed to our understanding of economic globalization and the way in which gender and globalization intersect.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ECON+5 or WGST+12 Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: DIT, WI
ECON 380 - Formerly 185 - European Research Seminar (4)
Each student designs and conducts an independent research project on a topic selected in consultation with the Resident Director of the European Semester and approved by the appropriate departmental liaison. The project will stress library research, as well as personal interviews, and may include trips to appropriate EU member states. (Students may also register as an independent study in any approved major)
ECON 400 - Formerly 199 - Economics Capstone Seminar (2)
Description pending.
ECON 250 - Formerly 29 - Selected Topics in Economics (2-4)
Recent topics have included the economics of food and nutrition, the economics of corporate downsizing, and the economics of financial market integration and comparative central banking.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: ECON+5 (and ECON+6 when topic merits it; see course listings each semester) Offering to be determined.
ECON 230 - Formerly 30 - The Economics of Health and Health Care (4)
This is an applied microeconomics class in the field of health and health care. It explores why individuals make decisions that affect their health including healthy and unhealthy behaviors and their demand for medical care. It also explores the supply of medical care from physicians, hospitals and technology development (both pharmaceutical and medical devices.) The class will use economic frameworks and econometric analysis to gain insights into the pressing public policy issues of health insurance coverage and access to medical care, medical care inflation, obesity and smoking, infections diseases (particularly AIDS in developing nations) and incentives for further research and development in medical care.

Fulfills: BSS
ECON 238 - Formerly 38 - Economics of Labor and Trade Unions (4)
An analysis of labor markets, including determination of wage levels, compensation and working conditions, the impact of international trade and foreign investment, investment in human capital, differential wages, labor migration and unions, strikes and collective bargaining. Examines current issues facing employees and unions.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 Offered spring semester.
ECON 240 - Formerly 40 - Economics of the Third World (4)
Seeks to examine the different approaches to economic development (both theoretical and policy); particular development issues (e.g., population, food, industrialization, foreign investment, debt and environmental damage); and actual development experiences in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America to show the interconnections of the Third World to the developed industrial world.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
ECON 241 - Formerly 41 - Global Economy (4)
An examination of the global economy focusing on economic geography, international trade in primary commodities, manufactures and services, foreign investment and transnational corporations, and the impact of regional economic blocs (such as the North American Free Trade Area) and treaties (such as the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs). The course covers theory and institutions of international economic activity and current issues of economic globalization.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years.
ECON 242 - Formerly 42 - International Business (4)
An introduction to international business and economics for students who are interested in applying their skills as an economist to the business world. Examines the decision-making process confronting businesses operating on an international level. Explores international trade and investment along with economic development as related to business. Also focuses on international agencies (government and private) that affect international business along with the international monetary systems within which business operates.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 and 6 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years.
ECON 245 - Formerly 45 - Environmental Economics (4)
Economic analyses of environmental and ecological issues, focusing on both applied microeconomic analysis and ecological economics. Topics include the "polluter pays" principle, the valuation of natural resources, the role of the market and regulation in dealing with environmental issues, sustainable development, the environmental impact of international trade, and issues of renewable and nonrenewable resources.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 Offered alternate years.
Fulfills: BI
ECON 247 - Formerly 47 - Economics of Business and Sustainability (4)
This course considers the environmental challenges facing business. It will examine business responses to environmental regulation, competitive advantages of "green" business, consumer demand for green products, product life cycle analysis, industrial ecology, environmental partnerships between business and non-governmental organizations, natural capitalism, and business education. Environmental decision-making of both large corporations and small businesses will be included in the course. The course will include case studies, outside speakers from the business community and student presentations.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 Offered alternate years.
ECON 281 - Formerly 49 - Wall Street and the Economy (4)
The operations and institutions of financial markets; their role in financing new investments, pensions, etc. ; their impact on local, national, and global economies. The economic history and ethical dimensions of Wall Street and its relation to macroeconomic policy.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ECON+5 and 6 and acceptance into the Wall Street Semester Offered spring semester.
ECON 101 - Formerly 5 - Economic Principles: Microeconomics (4)
An introduction to basic microeconomic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the roles markets play in an economy and the ways in which government can alter market activity. Includes such topics as consumer and firm behavior, competition and monopoly, poverty and justice, the environment, health care, and international trade.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
ECON 282 - Formerly 50 - Colloquium on Wall Street: Practical Realities and Recent Issues (4)
The practical day-to-day operations of the financial markets and institutions located in New York City. Talks by guest speakers drawn from the finance industry itself, as well as from corporations, government regulatory agencies, and institutional investors, shareholder activists, academics and others. Field trips to New York City to stock brokerages, the New York Stock Exchange, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and various commodity exchanges. Speakers, field trips, and student projects explore recent issues, such as the impact of derivatives and other financial innovations. Students are required to keep a journal and make oral presentations about their experiences on Wall Street, including their meetings with prominent speakers from a wide variety of private and nonprofit institutions.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ECON+5 and 6 and acceptance into the Wall Street Semester
ECON 102 - Formerly 6 - Economic Principles: Macroeconomics (4)
An introduction to basic macroeconomic analysis with special emphasis on problems of unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Topics include national income determination; money, financial markets, and monetary policy; fiscal policy and the economic role of government; the United States and the world economy.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
ECON 262 - Formerly 62 - Poverty and Policy (4)
This course discusses the causes and consequences of poverty in an otherwise affluent society. It examines the historical pattern of the inequality of income in the last half century in the U.S., and identifies the groups who remain poor in spite of economic growth. It discusses how to measure poverty and shows how changes in the structure of the economy-technological change and globalization-have affected the demand for the labor in different categories. Economic policy towards poverty and the recent national changes in welfare policy are examined and assessed. Various state welfare to work plans will be compared. Different political and philosophical approaches to the poor implied by different policy approaches will be discussed.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 Offered alternate years.
ECON 285 - Formerly 63 - The Economics of European Integration (4)
This course offers a study of the institutions, cases, processes, and competing theories of European economic integration in the era of the European Union. Special attention is focused on Europe's product, labor, and capital markets, as well as EU policies related to these areas and the "social market" economies of selected EU member states.
Prerequisite: ECON+5 Offered fall semester

ENGL

ENGL 311 - Formerly 103 - Nonfiction Writing (4)
Workshops with weekly round-table editing sessions, offering writing and reading assignments in established and innovative nonfiction forms. Emphasizes expressive writing-the personal and informal essay, autobiography and biography, the character sketch, vignette, narrative, and prose lyric.
At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College writing requirement Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 312 - Formerly 104 - Nonfiction Writing: Articles (4)
Workshops with weekly round-table editing sessions, offering writing and reading assignments in established and innovative nonfiction forms. Emphasizes the factual article as a literary form-practice in assembling facts (research and interviewing procedures) and in shaping the informative, lively article, editorial, and critical review.
At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College writing requirement Offered annually.
ENGL 313 - Formerly 107 - Creative Writing Workshop: Short Fiction (4)
Exercises in characterization, setting, dialogue, and narration. Incorporates these elements of fiction into complete stories. Class discussion of manuscripts.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College writing requirement. Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 314 - Formerly 108 - Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry (4)
Practice in elements of the poet's craft, focusing particularly on the language of emotion and the uses of metaphor. Explores traditional verse patterns and encourages the development of one's own imaginative perception and style.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College Writing Requirement. Offered annually.
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 315 - Formerly 109 - Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Fiction (4)
This course is a workshop for students wishing to develop a sophisticated fiction writing vocabulary and a vigorous exploration of literature via the study and creation of it. The course will be made up of creation classes on specific issues of craft, such as point of view, character development, and dialogue. Students will read full novels and story collections and be expected to use skills gleaned from these texts in their own work. The course will push students past the "write what you know" paradigm; key to this course will be developing research and observational skills in order to create and appreciate literature beyond your own experience.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors. Prerequisite: ENGL 311 - Formerly 103 - ,104,107 or 108, submission of writing sample and application. Offered fall semester.
ENGL 316 - Formerly 110 - Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Poetry (4)
An advanced course in the art of poetry for students who have completed an introductory creative writing workshop. Focused on advanced strategies for developing poets, including metrics, prosody, traditional formal schemes, imitations, radical revisions, experimental poetry, sequences, and the longer lyric.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+103, 104, 107 or 108, submission of writing sample and application. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 350 - Formerly 112 - Advanced Studies in Medieval or Renaissance Literature (2-4)
Topics may include Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, the impact of literacy on the fictions and poetry of medieval Britain, the medieval romance, medieval literature and spirituality, medieval and early Renaissance drama, Renaissance poetry.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+21B Offered in alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 351 - Formerly 113 - Adv.Studies in British Lit.of The 17th or 18th Century (2-4)
This course investigates developments in the Early Modern period that set foundations for our contemporary literature. Topics may include social settings in which manuscripts were written and exchanged, the rise of print culture, breaking the icon of the King, religious lyric poetry, love lyrics, Restoration drama, experiments with fiction and the beginnings of the novel, early women writers, political and social satire, and cultural responses to the French Revolution and to the expansion of empire.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+21A Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 352 - Formerly 114 - Advanced Studies of British Literature of the 19th Century (2-4)
Offerings of this course take a variety of subjects and forms in studying British literature of the nineteenth century: specific authors or groups of authors in the Romantic or Victorian periods; subjects within and across the two periods such as literary responses to revolution, industrialism, empire, class and religious issues; topics such as the Gothic, realism, Victorian, "medievalism," the psychological self in nineteenth-century writing, the role of art in the social order.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20B Offered in alternate fall semesters.
Fulfills: WI
ENGL 353 - Formerly 115 - Advanced Studies in British Literature of the 20th Century (2-4)
An advanced examination of British and/or Anglophone literatures in the 20th century, focusing on topics such as, modernism and fascism, post-colonialism, the representation and effects of the World Wars, gender and modernism, expatriation and alienation, and modernist women writers.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A Offered in alternate spring semesters.
Fulfills: WI
ENGL 354 - Formerly 116 - Advanced Studies in American Literature to the Civil War (2-4)
An advanced examination of American literature before the Civil War. Topics include transcendentalism, visions and revisions, the American novel, literary responses to the Civil War and the aftermath of slavery. Writers may include Irving, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Jacobs, Douglass, Stowe.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+20B Offered in alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 355 - Formerly 117 - Advanced Studies in American Literature from the Civil War to World War I (2-4)
Topics include women writers in post-Civil War America and regional and national voices from the Civil War to WWI. Perspectives on realism, naturalism, women's voices, regional and national voices in the fiction, nonfiction and poetry from the end of the Civil War to World War I. Writers may include Twain, James, Dickinson, Adams, Crane, Davis, Chopin, London, Gilman, Wharton, and Jewett.
Amount of credit established at registration. Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A or 20B Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 356 - Formerly 118 - Advanced Studies in American Literature of the 20th Cent. (2-4)
Topics include artistic movements such as Naturalism, the Beats, New Journalism, Modernism, or Postmodernism; covering fields such as women's literature, ethnic literatures, or immigrant literature; intertextuality; literature in relation to social movements of the second half of the century, historical eras such as the Great Depression, Cold War, World Wars; or major authors.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A Offered in alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 357 - Formerly 119 - Advanced Studies in Literature of the 20th Century (2-4)
Recognizing the fluidity of boundaries and national identities, this course is an advanced study of British, American, and Anglophone literature of the 20th Century. The course will focus on particular literary themes, topics, or genres that cross or problematize national or geographic boundaries. For example, American expatriate authors, diasporic literatures, literary concerns of immigrants from one specific nation to several (e.g., from India or African nations to America and Britain).
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A Offered in alternate spring semesters.
Fulfills: WI
ENGL 321 - Formerly 121 - Comparative Critical Theory and Practice (2-4)
May focus on one or compare two contemporary or historical approaches to literature, such as close reading, psychoanalytic, philosophical, new historicist, feminist, Marxist, structuralist, deconstructive, or reader-response criticism.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: Either A/B OR A/B Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 302 - Formerly 122A - Cultural Studies (4)
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of critical methods in "cultural materialism" and "cultural studies," specifically focusing on Marxist approaches to the criticism of literature and culture. In what sense has Marx's understanding of "ideology" and intellectual production provided modern cultural criticism with new models for understanding the value and function of art, literature, and discourse in relation to the formation of civil society? How have these analytical and theoretical models been complicated and revised in light of key developments in the 20th century, from the rise of mass culture, the emergence of new technologies for the production and dissemination of culture, to more recent shifts in cultural production augmented by transformations in the global political economy?
Prerequisite: One of the following as appropriate: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, ENGL+21A, B.
ENGL 322 - Formerly 123 - Intensive reading of a single text (2-4)
This course allows sustained concentration on a single text. In some semesters, the text itself will be a long and difficult one (e.g., Paradise Lost or Finnegan's Wake). In other semesters the course will cover a more accessible literary text but that text will be viewed through the lenses of various kinds of interpretation (e.g., cultural criticism, performance theory, formalism, gender studies, deconstruction, psychoanalytical theory).
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: One of the following as appropriate: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, A, ENGL+ 21B. Offered alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 323 - Formerly 124 - Approaches to Literature: Genre (2-4)
All writers conceive of themselves as writing inside of a genre. If writing inside of a genre involved only the imposition of constraint, writers surely would not choose to do it. What is genre? How does it open possibilities for writing? How do genres change over time and across cultures? What is the relationship between literary genre and the way humans frame their emotional, intellectual, and social experience? The focus will be on a single genre (e.g., novel, lyric poem, tragedy, comedy, epic, ballad, gothic novel, graphic novel, etc.)
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Priority given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: One of the following as appropriate: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, A, ENGL+ 21B. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 324 - Formerly 125 - Approaches to Literature: Biographical (2-4)
How much can we read into a work based on our knowledge of a writer's life? In this course we will look at literary texts in relation to letters and diaries. We will then look at how biographers and literary critics used those same letters and diaries to say something about the author's life or writings. After reading some essays by biographers about the challenges that they have faced in their work, students will attempt to compose an argument of their own by drawing on letters, diaries, or other primary sources.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: One of the following as appropriate: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, A, ENGL+ 21B. Offered in alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 325 - Formerly 126 - Approaches to Literature: Intertextual (2-4)
This course explores the various ways that texts "answer" each other or imbricate each other. Writers often compose a text in response to another work (sometimes contemporaneous, sometimes distant). Writers also develop rivalries, write for each other as audience, feel especially influenced by or even possessed by another writer. In some eras, all literature is considered to be "part" of a larger project or in response to a "big" text (e.g., the Bible). Some literary works are written in the shadow of another language. Different theories of intertextuality will be covered.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 326 - Formerly 127 - Approaches to Literature: Cultural (2-4)
How do critics work on the relationship between literary texts and other cultural materials (such as popular culture, legal and religious discourse, social history, political history)? This course will look at literary texts in the context of extra-literary materials.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B. Offered in alternate fall semesters.
ENGL 327 - Formerly 128 - Approaches to Painterly Literature: (2-4)
The course covers interactions between literary artists and visual artists. We will look at individual writers' responses to particular works of art as well as broader relationships such as visual iconography in medieval works or breakthrough moments in modernism and postmodernism when writers' exposure to the visual arts led them to invent new modes of composition and of perception.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: One of the following as appropriate: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, A, ENGL+ 21B. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 308 - Formerly 131 - Advanced Studies in Anglophone Literature (2-4)
An examination of literature in English by authors residing in or originating from English speaking nations other than Britain and America. The course may focus on literature from any one region, such as the Caribbean or South Asia; one nation, such as South Africa, Australia, or India; or a continent, such as Africa. It may explore the literature of those who emigrate from those regions, connections between the literature of those who remain at home and those who leave, the effects of colonialism on the nation, or the development of national literatures after colonialism. The course may also focus on specific historical moments, such as apartheid South Africa or Indian partition; or problems, such as the definition of "postcolonial," hybridity and identity, or the development of global Englishes.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A or ENGL+20B as appropriate. Offered in alternate fall semesters.
Fulfills: DIT
ENGL 303 - Formerly 132 - Women's Literary Tradition (4)
Examines works by women writers in the Anglo-American and Anglophone tradition through the historical and theoretical approaches that have emerged from recent feminist criticism and theory. May focus on a particular genre, period, author or authors, the literature of a particular region, or on literature in particular social or cultural contexts. Such topics as: Women Writers and World War I; Female Bildungsroman; African American Women Writers; Victorian Women Poets.
Cross listed with Women's Studies. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+9 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH
ENGL 304 - Formerly 133 - Advanced Studies in Sexuality & Literature (4)
In continuing the study of and moving beyond English 33, this class examines how sexuality is articulated and mediated through literature and such modes of cultural production as film and two-dimensional art. Attention will be paid to specific iterations of sexuality and the labels that attend them (e.g., gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual). Emphasis on queer theory and critical thinking on sexuality. We will read such authors as Sappho, Wilde, Gilbert and Gubar, Whitman, Ginsberg, Winterson, Doty, White, Bishop and Hart Crane. The course may focus on a specific theme or sub-genre such as speculative Utopic narratives or Race, Ethnicity & Sexuality.
Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL+9 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
ENGL 305 - Formerly 134 - Advanced Studies in Ethnic American Literature (4)
Intensive study in American ethnic literatures: African American, Asian American, Latino/a, American Indian, Jewish, and Caribbean literatures, among others. Instructors may select particular emphases for these areas of study, which can include a focus on chronological or thematic approaches or on the development of a particular genre, such as poetry, novel, short fiction, autobiography, or drama. Central to the study of these literatures is a consideration of the unique aspects of ethnic cultures in the United States that inform various American ethic literary traditions.
Course may be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+9 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate spring semester.
Fulfills: DUS
ENGL 301 - Formerly 140 - Topics in Literature (4)
An advanced study of particular literary subjects (e.g. the literature of the Holocaust, immigrant literature), topics (Old English language and literature, myth and literature), problems (e.g., literacy and orality, modern constructions of older/ancient texts), and methodologies (e.g., psychoanalytic approaches, comparative literature.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Priority is given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+9 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall semester.
ENGL 320 - Formerly 142 - Advanced Studies in History of the Language (2-4)
Topics may include Anglo-Saxon ("Old English") language, Middle English, African American Vernacular English, dialect studies, global Englishes.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Given to English majors and minors. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 276 - Formerly 143 - Shakespeare (4)
An advanced study of the development of Shakespeare as a dramatist through the study of about seven plays-comedies, histories, and tragedies. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: ENGL+21B Offered annually fall semester in London.
ENGL 306 - Formerly 146 - Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Language (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such as Anglophone, postcolonial, border or immigrant literature or film, literature from US territories, regional literature, literature and film, literature and environment, or other topics. This course includes an emphasis on diverse literatures and cultures of the United States from the perspective of more than on discipline, area, or field.
ENGL 383 - Formerly 169 - British Political Drama (4)
Under the premise that all theatre has a political dimension and works its influence on audiences both overtly and subversively, this course is designed to take advantage of the huge variety of productions available in London venues (not necessarily conventional theatre spaces), with a focus on the political questions they raise for twenty-first century audiences. Because the 1960s saw big changes on the theatrical scene in Britain it is taken as a starting point, and we see what we can of the playwrights who helped form our present day theatre through the twentieth century. Because it does not operate in a vacuum, appropriate plays may be chosen from other periods and cultures that address crucial global, social and political issues.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered Fall Semester. Same as: THEA+169
Fulfills: BH, BA
ENGL 371 - Formerly 171 - Studies in Poetry: Seminar (4)
A study of selected major works of poetry or a school of poetry. For example, Caribbean poetry, New York School poets, or modern American poetry.
Course may be repeated. Open only to juniors and seniors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+250, 251, 252, 253 and at least one Approaches course. Offered Annually.
ENGL 372 - Formerly 172 - Studies in Fiction: Seminar (4)
A study of selected major works of fiction. Focus depends on instructor. Course may be repeated as topic varies.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment limit: 15. Open only to juniors or seniors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+250, 251, 252, 253 and at least one Approaches course. Offered fall semester.
ENGL 373 - Formerly 173 - Studies in Poetry or Drama: Seminar (4)
A study of selected major works of poetry or drama or a school of poetry or drama. For example, Caribbean poetry, New York School poets, medieval drama, or modern American drama. Course may be repeated as topic varies.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment limit: 15 Open only to juniors or seniors Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B and at least one Approaches course. Offered fall semester.
ENGL 374 - Formerly 174 - Advanced Literary Studies: Seminar (4)
An intensive study of a theme, problem, or literary genre. The topic varies from year to year, but the seminar is designed to offer students an extended analysis of that topic and the opportunity to explore it from a number of perspectives and critical positions.
Course may be repeated as topic varies. Enrollment limit: 15 Open only to juniors or seniors Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B and at least one Approaches course. Offered fall semester.
ENGL 375 - Formerly 175 - Major Author: Seminar (4)
A close reading and a critical examination of the work of an individual British, American, or Anglophone author. The author varies from year to year, but the focus of the course is an immersion into the work of that author and an engagement with the criticism of that work. In some seminars students may work with archival material. Others will focus primarily on the texts, explore significant debates about the work or its interpretation, or view the texts through a specific theoretical framework. Course may be repeated as topic varies.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment limit: 15 Open only to juniors or seniors Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: A,20B,21A,21B, and at least one Approaches course. Offered spring semester.
ENGL 376 - Formerly 176 - Shakespeare on Film: Seminar (4)
An intensive study of about four major plays by means of examination of different film versions.
Enrollment limit: 15 Open only to juniors or seniors Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ENGL+20A, 20B, 21A, 21B, at least one Approaches course, and ENGL+143 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 300 - Formerly 180 - Independent Study in Literature (2-4)
A tutorial course with meetings by arrangement and oral and written reports. Students who wish to pursue independent study must offer for approval of the instructor a proposal on a literary topic not covered in the curriculum. Joint proposals by two or more students may be submitted.
Course may be repeated. Open only to students with junior or senior standing Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
ENGL 380 - Formerly 182 - Research Tutorial (4)
Each student conducts research and writes a paper on a topic approved by the London program instructor. The project stresses normal library research as well as personal interviews and other out-of-class experiences as part of the research process. Students are urged to consult with their home campus adviser about their topic before going to London.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in the London program. Same as: PSCI+182
ENGL 384 - Formerly 189 - Studies in British Literature: London Literature (4)
For this course we shall become London flaneurs, walking the streets and interpreting the signs of the city as if it were a text. We shall read a range of nineteenth and twentieth century writings, including classics such as Our Mutual Friend, and lesser known works. Through Amy Levy (Reuben Sachs), Virginia Woolf (Mrs. Dalloway) and Jean Rhys (Good Morning, Midnight) we can explore the changing role of women in the metropolis. In Alexander Baron's The Lowlife we can glimpse the East End's historic importance as a home to refugees and see how it turned into Bangla Town in Monica Ali's Brick Lane. In Conrad we find London as the centre of Empire and in the work of Sam Selvon and Monica Ali we have examples of how the Empire has written back. By paying close attention to both text and context, we shall achieve a lively appreciation of the works in and of themselves and as part of the cultural life of London.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester in London.
ENGL 400 - Formerly 199 - Senior Capstone in English (4)
The Capstone is the culmination of a student's work in the major. It offers seniors the opportunity to integrate the skills and approaches they have learned in previous classes and use them to analyze and discuss works of literature selected by the faculty and to guide further research in an area of their concentration. In addition to discussing selected common texts, each student develops an extended research project drawing on the courses they have taken as part of their concentration. Students present their research to each other and faculty members throughout the term and produce an expanded research paper. Signature of instructor required for registration.
[CAP] Capstone Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor. Approved major concentration. Open to seniors only. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
ENGL 253 - Formerly 20A - Mapping the Anglo-American Literary Tradition 1900-Presen (2)
Taught in four two-credit modules, this course maps Anglo-American literary history from the medieval period to the twentieth century. This essential experience grounds English majors and minors in key texts as well as in major periods, transitions, shifts, and trends along with influences between and among them. Conducted primarily in lecture and discussion form to facilitate students' reading of difficult texts, the course involves extensive reading of primary works from each period and select twentieth-century texts set in dialogue with them. Assessment is primarily through written exams.
Prerequisite: ENGL+9 Corequisite: ENGL+4 (Simultaneous enrollment with one of the four modules). Offered annually, 20 A/B in the spring, 21 A/B in the fall).
ENGL 252 - Formerly 20B - Mapping the Anglo-American Literary Tradition: 1800-1900 (2)
Taught in four two-credit modules, this course maps Anglo-American literary history from the medieval period to the twentieth century. This essential experience grounds English majors and minors in key texts as well as in major periods, transitions, shifts, and trends along with influences between and among them. Conducted primarily in lecture and discussion form to facilitate students' reading of difficult texts, the course involves extensive reading of primary works from each period and select twentieth-century texts set in dialogue with them. Assessment is primarily through written exams.
Prerequisite: ENGL+9 Corequisite: ENGL+4 (Simultaneous enrollment with one of the four modules). Offered annually, 20 A/B in the spring, 21 A/B in the fall).
ENGL 251 - Formerly 21A - Mapping the Anglo-American Literary Tradition: 1600-1800 (2)
Taught in four two-credit modules, this course maps Anglo-American literary history from the medieval period to the twentieth century. This essential experience grounds English majors and minors in key texts as well as in major periods, transitions, shifts, and trends along with influences between and among them. Conducted primarily in lecture and discussion form to facilitate students' reading of difficult texts, the course involves extensive reading of primary works from each period and select twentieth-century texts set in dialogue with them. Assessment is primarily through written exams.
Prerequisite: ENGL+9 Corequisite: ENGL+4 (Simultaneous enrollment with one of the four modules). Offered annually, 20 A/B in the spring, 21 A/B in the fall).
ENGL 250 - Formerly 21B - Mapping the Anglo-Amer.Lit. Trad: Medieval to Renaissance (2)
Taught in four two-credit modules, this course maps Anglo-American literary history from the medieval period to the twentieth century. This essential experience grounds English majors and minors in key texts as well as in major periods, transitions, shifts, and trends along with influences between and among them. Conducted primarily in lecture and discussion form to facilitate students' reading of difficult texts, the course involves extensive reading of primary works from each period and select twentieth-century texts set in dialogue with them. Assessment is primarily through written exams.
Prerequisite: ENGL+9 Corequisite: ENGL+4 (Simultaneous enrollment with one of the four modules). Offered annually, 20 A/B in the spring, 21 A/B in the fall).
ENGL 101 - Formerly 30 - Western Literature I (4)
Reading and analysis of selected works in the Western literary tradition from ancient to early medieval periods. Approaches may vary from a survey of works from Homer to Augustine, to a topical approach such as a study of justice and individual choice represented in the works, to a genre approach such as a study of epic.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, WI
ENGL 102 - Formerly 31 - Western Literature II (4)
Reading and analysis of selected works in the Western literary tradition from the High Middle-Ages to the modern period. Approaches may vary from a survey of works from Dante to Woolf, to a topical approach such as a study of power represented in the works, to a genre approach such as a study of prose narrative.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WI, BH
ENGL 103 - Formerly 32 - Gender and Literature (2-4)
An introduction to questions of how gender, as it intersects with race, class, and sexuality, shapes literary texts, authorship, readership, and representation. Most often organized thematically, the course may focus on such issues as creativity, subjectivity, politics, work, sexuality, masculinity, or community in works chosen from a variety of periods, genres, and areas.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors, Women's Studies majors and minors. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH
ENGL 104 - Formerly 33 - Sexuality and Literature (2-4)
This course examines how sexuality is articulated and mediated through literature and such modes of cultural production as film and two-dimensional art. Attention will be paid to specific iterations of sexuality and the labels that attend them (e.g., gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual). We will address theories of sexuality and study such authors as Jeanette Winterson, Mark Doty, Edmund White, Hart Crane, Cherrie Moraga, Gloria Anzaldua, and Michael Cunningham. The course may additionally encompass how sexuality intersects with ethnicity, science and politics.
Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 105 - Formerly 34 - Topics in American Ethnic, Immigrant, or Regional Lit. (4)
An exploration of literature of the American ethnic, immigrant, or regional experience. The course may focus on one ethnicity, such as Jewish American or Arab American; explore the immigrant experience as it is articulated in works from several ethnicities including Italian American, Irish American, Eastern European, Asian American, South Asian American, or Latino/a; or it may focus on literature produced within specific geographical regions, regional schools, or regional traditions of the United States, including Southern literature, literature of the Great Plains, the Northwest, the Southwest, California, New York City, or New Jersey.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate fall semesters..
Fulfills: BH, DUS
ENGL 106 - Formerly 35 - African American Literature (4)
A study of the writers in the African American literary tradition from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Through a variety of genres, we will examine the work of selected writers in light of their historical time and place, major themes, conclusions about the nature of black experience in the United States and their contributions to this literary tradition and to the American literary canon. We will pay close attention to particular movements in this tradition, such as the Harlem Renaissance, protest literature, the Black Arts movement, and contemporary directions in the literature since 1970. Writers may include: Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, Paule Marshall, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Sonia Sanchez, and Alice Walker.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate spring semesters..
Fulfills: DUS, BH
ENGL 107 - Formerly 36 - Asian American Literature (2-4)
Examines works by women writers in the Anglo-American and Anglophone tradition through the historical and theoretical approaches that have emerged from recent feminist criticism and theory. May focus on a particular genre, period, author or authors, the literature of a particular region, or on literature in particular social or cultural contexts. Such topics as: Women Writers and World War I; Female Bildungsroman; African American Women Writers; Victorian Women Poets.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
ENGL 108 - Formerly 37 - Latino/a Literature (2-4)
This course will reconsider such issues as critical race theory and identity construction, gender and sexuality, hybridity, American canon formation, and nation-building in light of the contemporary Latino Boom (in music, film, art, television, and literature). The course considers thematic and figurative background to the literature such as la Malinche, Aztlan, Quetzalcoatl, Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, la Llorona, la Virgen de Guadalupe, Nepantla, and Braceros. Authors studied may include Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros, Cherrie Moraga, Gloria Anzaldua, Rudolfo Anaya, Rolando Hinojosa, Luis Valdez, Cristina Garcia, Junot Diaz, and Julia Alvarez.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate fall semesters.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
ENGL 220 - Formerly 38 - History and Structure of the English Language (4)
A study of the development of English from Anglo-Saxon to its present status as a "global" language. The development of English is placed within the framing social, political and economic contexts of its speakers. May also examine the historical development of theories attempting to explain English, its styles, dialects, and literatures.
Same as: LING+105. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 221 - Formerly 39 - History of Rhetoric (4)
Rhetoric, most typically defined as "the art of persuasion," has had a variety of descriptions based on the describer and his or her historical context. This class will study the changing definitions of rhetoric from 5th-century B.C. Greece to contemporary American culture and why those changes took place. Students will also be asked to analyze rhetoric's relation to politics, religion, law and cultural identity from antiquity to the present day.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Offered in alternate spring semesters.
ENGL 210 - Formerly 4 - Writing in the Discipline of English (2)
This six-week module will use the texts discussed in ENGL+20 a/b or ENGL+21 a/b as the basis for papers and extended research. Students will study the discourse conventions of English and practice the skills necessary for writing in the discipline of English. The course will include instruction in MLA style, advanced library research, and bibliographic skills.
Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors. Meets: twice a week for six weeks. Corequisite or Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in one of the following: ENGL+20A, ENGL+20B, ENGL+21A, OR ENGL+21B. Offered first and second half of each semester.
Fulfills: WM
ENGL 201 - Formerly 40 - Selected Topics in Literature I (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such as gothic literature, Anglophone literature, Bible as literature, postcolonial literature, writers writing on visual art, humor in literature, the literature of the Holocaust, or other topics.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BH
ENGL 202 - Formerly 41 - Selected Topics in Literature & Language II (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such as film and film adaptations of literature, non-fiction prose, graphic novels, myth, modern constructions of older/ancient texts, or other topics.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BH
ENGL 204 - Formerly 42 - Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature & Language (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such as Anglophone literature, Bible as literature, postcolonial literature, writers writing on visual art, humor in literature, the literature of the Holocaust, film and film adaptations of literature, non-fiction prose, graphic novels, myth, modern constructions of older/ancient texts or other topics.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BI
ENGL 278 - Formerly 43 - Literary Translation (4)
This seminar introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to literary translation, as well as experience in translating literary texts. The course will begin with a history of approaches to translation, by reading both theoretical essays and a set of common texts in multiple translations, including works of classical and Biblical literature as well as contemporary prose and poetry. Each student will then undertake a translation of a short work of fiction or poetry with the goal of producing a publishable text in English. Students may work from any language into English or from a dialect or historical variety of English into a contemporary idiom. The seminar will feature guest lectures by Drew faculty from various programs whose work includes literary translation speaking about their own projects and experience as translators.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: WLIT+60
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 205 - Formerly 44 - Studies in American Ethnic or Immigrant Literature I (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such Anglophone, postcolonial, border or immigrant literature, literature from US territories, regional literature, the literature of the Holocaust, Bible as literature, or other topics. This course includes an emphasis on diverse literatures and cultures of the United States.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: DUS
ENGL 206 - Formerly 46 - Studies in American Ethnic or Immigrant Literature II (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such Anglophone, postcolonial, border or immigrant literature, literature from US territories, regional literature, the literature of the Holocaust, Bible as literature, or other topics. This course includes an emphasis on diverse literatures and cultures of the United States from the perspective of the humanities.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
ENGL 207 - Formerly 47 - Interdisciplinary Studies in American Ethnic or Immigrant L it (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such Anglophone, postcolonial, border or immigrant literature, literature from US territories, regional literature, the literature of the Holocaust, Bible as literature, or other topics. This course includes an emphasis on diverse literatures and cultures of the United States from the perspective of more than one discipline, area, or field.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BI, DUS
ENGL 209 - Formerly 48 - Interdisciplinary Studies in Anglophone or World Literature (2-4)
This course will focus on selected topics such Anglophone, postcolonial, border or immigrant literature, literature from US territories, literature in translation, the literature of the Holocaust, Bible as literature, or other topics. This course includes an emphasis on international and/or transnational literatures from the perspective of more than one discipline, area, or field.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to English majors and minors.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
ENGL 299 - Formerly 49 - Intermediate Open Topics-- Community-Based Learning (2-4)
This course is a community-based learning course, focused on making connections between a literary topic and some form of applied work in the community. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated as topic changes. Students should expect to devote some hours to work with community organizations beyond the established class time.
Course may be repeated.
ENGL 212 - Formerly 51 - Spoken Word: The Oral Interpretation of Literature (2)
This course explores literature as a performance art. In this course, students use many different methods to hone their ability to observe, describe, physically feel, and enact in performance the dynamic interaction of rhythm, syntactical structures, and semantics in literary texts. Students may perform their own writing in the course the work of spoken word and/or canonical writers. The course is useful for creative writers and for all students of literature, giving them insight into the mechanisms that produce emotional force, clarity, and the dynamics of the interplay between thought and feeling in all kinds of writing.
Check department listing for offering. Enrollment priority: English majors and writing minors.
Fulfills: BA
ENGL 213 - Formerly 53 - Special Topics Creative Writing Workshop (2-4)
A Creative writing workshop in creative non-fiction, poetry, or fiction, that focus on a particular theme, sub-genre, or problem. Topics could include writing that engages with the public sphere; occasional poetry (poetry that is composed for a particular occasion or is meant to be delivered to a particular person); interart poetry that engages with the visual arts, music, or vocal performance; writing that engages with a particular place such as New York City or the Drew campus; writing that combines genres or works intertextually; writing that engages with new media.
Course may be repeated.
ENGL 214 - Formerly 54 - Theory and Practice of Writing Center Tutoring (4)
This course introduces students to composition and tutoring theory and pedagogy. A writing intensive course, "Theory and Practice" combines readings in composition studies with a practicum that allows student to directly engage and interrogate the ideas and pedagogies they encounter. A significant portion of the course involves working directly with writers from a variety of disciplines. After successfully completing the class, students will be invited to apply for "writing fellow" and "writing tutor" positions in the Writing Center.

Fulfills: WI
ENGL 216 - Formerly 59 - Introduction to Journalism (4)
An introduction to the fundamentals and procedures of operating a newspaper. Emphasizes gathering news and writing clear, vigorous copy. Studies layout, editing, feature and editorial writing, and copy-editing as well as the ethics and responsibilities of journalism.
Enrollment limit: 15 Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College writing requirement Offered fall semester.
ENGL 215 - Formerly 65 - Writing For and About Business (4)
Concentrates on the development of a clear, precise writing style and practice in dealing with specific types of business writing problems. Students complete writing projects, individually and in teams, in the context of hypothetical business situations, such as preparing and presenting a report, preparing and presenting a project proposal, applying for a job, and reviewing a report or project proposal.
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the College writing requirement Offered every semester.
ENGL 150 - Formerly 9 - Literary Analysis (4)
Emphasis in the first part of the course is on expanding and honing strategies for close reading. The course covers accuracy and richness of interpretation, narrative theory, moving beyond the boundaries of the text to other cultural documents, reading drama performatively. By the end of the course, students should understand and be able to use a variety of criteria for judging the legitimacy of their own and others' interpretations. Students will be introduced to a range of ways that scholars work in the field of literary study. Emphases vary depending on instructor.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BH
ENGL 109 - Formerly AA1 - Introduction to Film Analysis (4)
This course will teach students to closely analyze and write about film. We will watch a range of international films from the early twentieth century to the present. The overall goal is to become an active, engaged, and responsible viewer of film. Students will learn the basic vocabulary and tools needed to break down scenes from a film and to thereby build an interpretation of the film as a whole. Each week we will watch and discuss a new feature-length film. Then, in the second class of that week, we will analyze this film in detail. In the second half of this class, students will also be exposed to a few of the major critical approaches and theoretical perspectives used in the field of film studies. The overall goal will be to approach cinema with passion and curiosity- and to appreciate its role in shaping how we see the world. Class requirements include quizzes on the readings, a mid-term exam, final paper, and a class presentation.

Fulfills: BH, BI
ENGL 110 - Formerly AA2 - Introduction to Media Studies (4)
This course offers an overview of the history, technological changes, and cultural and intellectual significance of media forms in modern culture. Media covered include print, electronic media (radio, television, film) and digital ("new") media (internet, social media, mobile media). Topics include the nature and function of media, media and its relationship to information and communication, and social and intellectual aspects of media.

Fulfills: BI

ESS

ESS 331 - Formerly 114 - Archaeology and Sustainable Culture (4)
Through Archaeology scholars reconstruct, examine, query and confront the record of past human-environment interactions. Placing these interactions in an historical context brings a long-term perspective to bear on contemporary issues. This course examines critically this record of human adaptations through time and across the globe with a particular focus on the ancient Americas. The view of archaeology is that the experiences of these ancient societies offer useful lessons about past choices which should affect the choices made today.
Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to majors or minors in Anthropology Prerequisite: ANTH+3 or 4 or permission of instructor Offered Spring semester in alternate years. Same as: ANTH+114
ESS 330 - Formerly 130 - Topics in Economics and the Environment (4)
A consideration of specific topics pertaining to the relationship of economic activities and the natural environment. Generally, one major topic will be considered each time the course is offered. Possible topics include: sustainable development; global warming and peak oil; carbon trading, taxation and subsidies as environmental policies; and consumption, well-being, the economy and the environment. May be repeated for credit with different topics.
May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: ECON+5 or ESS+30 Same as: ECON+130
Fulfills: BI
ESS 344 - Formerly 144 - Environmental Aesthetics (4)
An exploration of questions centered at the intersection of aesthetics and environmental philosophy. Of primary concern are the relation between the aesthetic appreciation of nature and the aesthetic appreciation of art; the roles played by scientific knowledge, emotional engagement and imagination in the aesthetic appreciation of nature; the thesis that all of wild nature has positive value; and the theoretical role aesthetic considerations play in the rationale behind environmental conservation.
Offered in alternate years. Same as: PHIL+144
Fulfills: WI, BH, BI
ESS 302 - Formerly 145 - Geographic Information Systems (4)
This course explores GIS (Geographic Information System) and related spatial analysis tools, which are used to elucidate the natural landscape and human modification of the earth's surface. Students will acquire cartographic, ArcGIS, and remote sensing skills through case studies and individual research investigations.
Enrollment priority: Given to majors in Biology,Environmental Studies,and Archaeology. Same as: BIOL+145
Fulfills: Q, BI
ESS 304 - Formerly 146 - Earth's Dynamic Surface:From Mount Everest to Ocean Floor (4)
The Earth's surface is diverse, with mountains, rivers, coasts, and glaciers existing in various locations on the planet. It is also dynamic, as mountains rise and fall, rivers meander, and coastlines evolve. In this course, we will explore how and why the Earth looks the way that it does, while considering important factors such as the impacts of climate, sea level changes, human activities, and plate tectonics. We will use the New Jersey landscape as a case study, exploring how it has changed from a landscape like the East African Rift, to its present, muted topography. Students will learn basic techniques for field geologists, methods of data analysis and presentation, and skills for effective reading of peer-reviewed literature.
These skills will be directly relevant to students interested in environmental science, ecology, archaeology, and anthropology. Prerequisite: : Introductory lab science course or /Introduction to Environmental Science. Offering to be determined. Same as: BIOL+146
ESS 400 - Formerly 185 - Environmental Studies and Sustainabilty Capstone Seminar (4)
A capstone course for seniors in the environmental studies program, who will come together to investigate environmental and sustainability issues from diverse perspectives using a variety of methodologies. The course will emphasize critical thinking and the ability to synthesize material from a broad variety of sources and disciplines to solve current problems related to the environment and sustainability.
[CAP] Capstone. Prerequisite: ESS+30 AND ESS+40
ESS 382 - Formerly 190 - Advanced Topics in Environmental Science (4)
Occasional advanced elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to environmental science. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Varies with topic. Offering to be determined.
ESS 381 - Formerly 191 - Advanced Topics in Environmental Humanities (4)
Occasional advanced elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Varies with topic. Contact program director. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, BI, WI
ESS 383 - Formerly 192 - Advanced Topics: Environment a nd Society (2-4)
Occasional elective courses on environmental topics that focus on social science issues and perspectives. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisites vary with topic. Information is available from ESS website.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.
Fulfills: BI, BSS
ESS 300 - Formerly 196 - Research in Environmental Studies (4)
An opportunity for upper-level environmental studies students to design and execute independent projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Interested students must make arrangements with a faculty mentor before registration. The amount of credit will established at time of registration.
May be repeated for up to 12 credits, but no more than 8 credits of ESS+196 combined with HON+109 will count toward the major. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Vary with the research topic.
ESS 102 - Formerly 2 - Geology in the Movies (4)
Is Los Angeles in danger of being destroyed by a volcano? Can Superman really stop an earthquake by holding the San Andreas Fault together? Is there anything to fear from the evil schemes concocted by James Bond's nemeses? We will explore the dynamics of planet Earth through exploring many of the myths and misconceptions created by Hollywood movies. Using well?known films, we will learn about earthquakes, volcanoes, meteors, evolution, and climate. We will conclude by discussing how the public's perception of the environment and of scientists is influenced by the way the entertainment industry, news media, and the scientific community present geologic concepts

Fulfills: BNS, BI
ESS 215 - Formerly 30 - Environmental Science (4)
This course explores the science behind environmental problems and solutions. Students study current environmental issues in the context of their scientific (biological, chemical, geological) underpinnings, while alos considering the political, social and cultural dimensions of these issues. The course also addresses the role of scientific knowledge in understanding and resolving environmental problems, such as climate change, population growth, deforestation, extinction, air and water pollution, food production, and environmental health. These topics are explored through readings, films, student writing, research and field trips.
Meets: Three hours of class. Same as: BIOL+30
Fulfills: BNS
ESS 104 - Formerly 4 - Toxic Chemicals: Great Challenges in Environ. Science (4)
This introductory course will research and discuss the challenges associated with detecting, evaluating and remediating the pollution of toxic chemicals in our environment. We will address these environmental challenges from a chemical perspective to understand the risks of water and air pollution, and to evaluate remediation strategies. This course includes a hands-on field/laboratory research project to gain proficiency designing, conducting and communicating scientific research.
Prior background in chemistry is not required. Meets: One hour class and three hour lab. Offered alternate spring semesters. Same as: CHEM+4
Fulfills: BNS, Q
ESS 210 - Formerly 40 - Environment, Society and Sustainability (4)
This course examines the relationship of human society to the natural environment from the perspective of sustainability, defined as meeting the needs of the present generation while preserving the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, we will consider how values, paradigms, policies, technologies, and their intricate interactions determine our current unsustainable relationship with nature, and we will explore proposals for moving society in an environmentally sustainable direction.

Fulfills: BSS, BI
ESS 101 - Formerly 8 - Introduction to Environmental Geology (4)
Humans interact with the Earth in many ways: we use natural resources, experience natural hazards, and design geoengineering techniques that modify natural processes. In this course, we consider how a diversity of human activities affects our environment, and how a diversity of natural processes affects humans. These topics will help us delve into the meaning of "sustainability" from the perspective of Earth scientists. We will use the modern and historic New Jersey landscape as a case study, but we will also discuss topics such as mountaintop removal in the Appalachians, earthquakes in Indonesia, and water usage in the Western US. Students will learn basic Earth science concepts, techniques for field scientists, methods of data analysis and presentation, and skills for effectively teasing apart complex environmental issues. This lab
Meets: Course meets 3 hours a week for lecture and 3 hours for lab.
Fulfills: BNS
ESS 282 - Formerly 90 - Special Topics in Environmental Science: (4)
Occasional elective courses or interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment.
Maybe repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Varies with topic, consult course listings or contact Program Director. Offering to be determined.
ESS 281 - Formerly 91 - Topics in Environmental Humanities (2-4)
Occasional elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment. Amount of credit established at time of registration.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Varies with topic. Contact program director. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, BI, WI
ESS 283 - Formerly 92 - Topics: Environment and Society (2-4)
Occasional elective courses on environmental topics that focus on social science issues and perspectives. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisites vary with topic. Information is available from ESS website.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.
Fulfills: BI, BSS

EUST - Formerly EURST

EUST 381 - Formerly EURST 100 - Colloquium Research Seminar on European Society (4)
Taught by the resident director, a Drew faculty member, this course introduces students to some of the cultural, social, and political institutions that define contemporary Europe through speakers and trips to museums, historic sites, the headquarters of the European Union, and NATO. As a research seminar, this course provides a forum in which students examine one aspect of contemporary Europe in depth. The results of students' research are presented in a final paper at the end of the semester.
Offered fall semester.
EUST 380 - Formerly EURST 185 - European Research Seminar (4)
Each student designs and conducts an independent research project on a topic selected in consultation with the Resident Director of the European Semester and approved by the appropriate departmental liaison. The project will stress library research, as well as personal interviews, and may include trips to appropriate EU member states. (Students may also register as an independent study in any approved major)

FILM

FILM 350 - Formerly 116 - Selected Studies in Film (4)
An intensive study of a single topic or problem in film history, theory, or criticism, or an analysis of works by a single filmmaker.
Course may be repeated. Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+116
Fulfills: BA
FILM 101 - Formerly 15 - The Art of Film (4)
An introduction to the basic expressive elements of film art. Extensive screenings illustrate such elements as shot composition, editing, camera movement, color, lighting, and directorial style. Readings in film theory and criticism.

Fulfills: BA
FILM 202 - Formerly 18 - History of Film (4)
A survey of developments in film history from 1895 to the present, from the foundation of the basic language of film to the rise of national cinema in the United States and Europe. Extensive screenings of illustrative works; readings in film history and criticism.

FREN

FREN 101 - Formerly 1 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written French I (4)
An introduction to the French spoken and written language. Covers the basics of the French language through videos, readings, and realia from Francophone cultures. Interactive practice in the classroom and use of multimedia lab, oral, written, and computer-assisted activities.
Offered fall semester.
FREN 302 - Formerly 101 - French Conversation and Composition: Current Events (4)
A conversation and composition class on current events and contemporary themes in France and the Francophone world. Course seeks to enhance oral fluency through class discussions, debates, and oral presentations on recent topics in the French media. Written practice through media analysis, press reviews, and short papers. May be taken concurrently with FREN+100 or FREN+102.
Prerequisite: FREN+30 or equivalent Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WI
FREN 381 - Formerly 101A - Advanced Conversation in Paris: Contemporary Topics (4)
A conversation class on current events and contemporary themes in France and the Francophone world. Course seeks to enhance oral fluency through class discussions, debates, and oral presentations on recent topics in the French media. Short writing assignments.
Offered in Paris. Prerequisite: FREN+30 or FREN+31.
FREN 304 - Formerly 102 - French Cinema (4)
Advanced conversation and writing practice through the viewing of contemporary French films on video. An examination of themes of French Francophone cultures through discussion, language study, papers, and computer activities designed for the course.
Prerequisite: FREN+30 or equivalent Offered spring semester.
FREN 310 - Formerly 104A - Literary Analysis: Games People Play (2)
This sequence of courses develops reading fluency and oral practice through a study of selected themes drawn from play, poetry and fiction in the French literary tradition. This sequence is required for French majors and for more advanced topics courses.
Prerequisite: (FREN+100 or FREN+101 or FREN+102) Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
FREN 310 - Formerly 104B - Literary Analysis: Strangers & Misfits (2)
This sequence of courses develops reading fluency and oral practice through a study of selected themes drawn from plays, poetry and fiction in the French literary tradition. This sequence is required for French majors and for more advanced topics courses.
Prerequisite: FREN+100, or FREN+101 or FREN+102. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
FREN 261 - Formerly 111 - Selected Topics in French and Francophone Literatures (2-4)
A study of a topic or topics in a linguistic, cultural, or literary aspect of the French-speaking world not covered by the current offerings of the French Department.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: FREN+30 Offering to be determined.
FREN 336 - Formerly 122 - North African Francophone Literature (4)
An investigation of the major components of Moroccan, Algerian, and Tunisian patterns of culture as seen in French-language literary texts. The historical background of Berber, Arab-Muslim, and Jewish cultural influences as well as the French impact on the Maghreb will be treated.
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A/B or the equivalent. Offered 2008-2009.
Fulfills: DIT
FREN 123 - African Francophone Literature (4)
An examination of the struggle between African cultures and modernity as seen in representative literary texts. The impact of Western influences as represented by the French political presence in Sub-Saharan Africa will be analyzed through contemporary Francophone literature produced primarily since 1950.
Offered triennially.
Fulfills: DIT
FREN 339 - Formerly 124 - African Francophone Literature (4)
An examination of the struggle between African cultures and modernity as seen in representative literary texts. The impact of Western influences as represented by the French political presence in Sub-Saharan Africa will be analyzed through contemporary Francophone literature produced primarily since 1950.
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: One upper-level French course, preferably 104A/B. Offered 2007-2008.
Fulfills: DIT
FREN 338 - Formerly 126 - French Caribbean Literature (4)
A study of the international aspect of Caribbean culture as represented by literary works from Martinique and Guadeloupe. Themes treated will include: oral culture, African roots, and French assimilation.
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: One upper-level French course, preferably A/B. Offered triennially.
Fulfills: DIT
FREN 306 - Formerly 130A - Advanced Composition and Stylistics I (2)
This advanced course in stylistics enables students to refine their writing skills and learn to write in a variety of styles. Review of advanced grammatical problems, basic principles of stylistic analysis, editing, and some translation from English to French.
Prerequisite: FREN+100, 101, or 102. Offering to be determined.
FREN 306 - Formerly 130B - Advanced Composition and Stylistics II (2)
This advanced course in stylistics enables students to refine their writing skills and learn to write in a variety of styles. Review of advanced grammatical problems, basic principles of stylistic analysis, editing, and some translation from English to French.
Prerequisite: FREN+100, 101, or 102. Offering to be determined.
FREN 350 - Formerly 140 - Reading and Writing French Poetry (4)
An examination of the nature of poetic creativity through numerous examples from 20th-century French and Francophone poets, such as Apollinaire, Breton, Eluard, Chedid, Desnos, Michaux, Reverdy, Senghor, Césaire. Students are encouraged to write their own poetry, which is published in a French literary journal.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 Offered in 2009-2010. Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+140
Fulfills: BA
FREN 352 - Formerly 142 - Poetry and Culture (4)
An examination of the changing relations between poetry and political, sexual, cultural, and social identities in the works of recent French and Francophone poets. Students are encouraged to write their own poetry, which is then published in a French literary journal.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 Offered in 2007-2008.
Fulfills: BA
FREN 364 - Formerly 154 - Contemporary French Theatre (4)
Representative works of the major playwrights of the 20th century, such as Sartre, Anouilh, Ionesco, Camus, and Duras. New trends emerging in the 21st century will also be studied.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 offered in 2008-2009 Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+154
FREN 354 - Formerly 164 - The Novel and Society in 20th Century France (4)
A study of works from 20th century fiction examining literary representations of social and political problems such as changing class structures, political revolt, and urban unrest. The course will focus on political and social commitment from the beginning of the 20th century to 1990.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 Offered in 2008-2009. Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+164
Fulfills: BH
FREN 340 - Formerly 180 - France in the 21st Century (4)
A study of representative texts showing cultural, social, economic, and political developments in France since 2000. Trends such as the impact of internationalism and the new Europe, as well as the challenging of social norms will be examined in fiction written since 2000.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 Offered in 2007-2008.
Fulfills: BH
FREN 348 - Formerly 186 - France in the 18th Century (4)
The 18th century in France was a period of major political, cultural, and ideological transformations, culminating in the French Revolution. The course examines how the printed word itself becomes a major weapon in the hands of the philosophers, women, and others to challenge the legitimacy of the established political and ideological order of the ancient régime.
Prerequisite: FREN+104 Offered in 2008-2009.
Fulfills: BH
FREN 300 - Formerly 194 - Independent Study (2-4)
A tutorial course. Students investigate a chosen topic in French or Francophone literature or language and culture under the guidance of French department faculty. Oral and written reports.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Open only to students with junior or senior standing Meets: weekly Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: 12 credits of advanced work in French with a B average Offered every semester.
FREN 102 - Formerly 20 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written French II (4)
French 20 is a continuation of French 1 or the equivalent level. Designed for students who have already covered the basics of the French language, but have yet been exposed to all tenses and other grammar fundamentals. Videos, culture readings, interactive practice in the classroom, multimedia lab, oral written and computer-assisted activities
Prerequisite: FREN+1 Offered every semester.
FREN 181 - Formerly 21 - Fundamentals of Oral French II in Paris (4)
a continuation of French 1 or the equivalent level. Designed for students who have already covered the basics of the French language, but have yet been exposed to all tenses and other grammar fundamentals. Videos, culture readings, interactive practice in the classroom, multimedia lab, oral written and computer-assisted activitie.
Offered in Paris. Prerequisite: FREN+1
FREN 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate French (4)
A continuation of FREN+20. Review of basic grammar; development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through films, discussion, Francophone articles and literary texts, compositions, multimedia lab and computer-assisted activities. A prerequisite for FREN+100, 101 and 102.
Prerequisite: FREN+20 Offered every semester.
FREN 281 - Formerly 31 - Intermediate French in Paris (4)
A continuation of FREN+20 or FREN+21. Review of basic grammar; development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through films, discussion, Francophone articles and literary texts, compositions, multimedia lab and computer-assisted activities.
Offered in Paris. Prerequisite: FREN+20 or FREN+21.
FREN 235 - Formerly 50 - Francophone Literature in Translation: Women Novelists (4)
A critical reading of novels written in French by women from the late 17th through the 20th centuries. The study of 20th-century authors also includes women writers from the Francophone world (Quebec, Africa, and the Caribbean).
Course may be repeated. Offered in 2008-2009.
Fulfills: BH
FREN 299 - Formerly 99 - French Across the Curriculum (1-2)
Foreign languages across the curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Prerequisite: FREN+30 or equivalent and signature of language instructor.
FREN 233 - Formerly AA1 - Is Another World Possible? Globalization in the Francophone World (4)
This intersiciplinary course draws from fiction and documentary films, critical essays, literary texts, manifestoes, as well as various forms of documentations of local and international street protests. It seeks to account for, and question, the specificities of anti-gloabalization reactions expressed in the Francophone world, particularly France, Quebec and West African countries. The current focus on "globalization" as an economic moment will thus be examined in relation to broader historical and intellectual debates. No Prerequisite. Taught in English. Offererd triennially.
FREN 346 - Formerly AA2 - Worlds of Wonder and Terror: Children's Literature (4)
This course provides a broad introduction to the rich traditions of texts written for children in French. Materials covered in class include picture books, fables, folklore, fantasy and realistic fiction from the classics to the most innovative texts. How do these texts represent the world of adults and the world of children? What cultural norms and values do they seek to reflect, promote or challenge? In particular, how do attitudes towards gender, class and race shift through the ages and across Francophone cultures? Oral and written assignments enchance student's creativity and sharpen analytical skills.
Prerequisite: (FREN+104A or FREN+104B)
FREN 366 - Formerly AA3 - Entertaining Crowds: Popular Culture in 19th and 20th Century France (4)
This course examines the social, economic and cultural contexts that facilitated the emergence of popular forms of cuture throughout the 19th century and the increased influence of mass media on cultural production throughout the twentieth century. Course materials will focus primarily on visual forms of expressions, including photography, visual panoramas, paintings, and cinema. Connections will be made with print and musical cultural productions, such as serial publications, crime and pulp fiction, songs and musical performances, in an effort to define the narrative and performing principles of these cultural productions as well as ways in which they have been consumed, gradually institutionalized and redefined over the course of the last two centuries. Selected reading assignments will help students frame critically the notions of and Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: (FREN+104A or FREN+104B)
FREN 362 - Formerly AA4 - Fantasy and Reality in French Cinema (1895-present) (4)
This course surveys major aesthetic trends and technological events in the history of French cinema, including examples of early actualits, poetic realism, 1960s cinma vrit and more recently heritage cinema and cinma de banlieue . In addition to weekly screenings, students are introduced to the critical discourse that has informed the field of film studies since the mid-twentieth century. Reading assignments will include texts by Andr Bazin, Franois Truffaut, Jean-Louis Comolli and more recently Jacques Rancire. Conducted in French. Offered triennially.
Prerequisite: FREN*316 (formerly FREN*104a/b) or Instructor's Signature.

GERM

GERM 101 - Formerly 1 - Elementary German I (4)
An introduction to German, emphasizing communicative skills. Areas such as society, geography, and traditions form the content base. Open to students have little or no experience in German or who have been assigned to the course after placement examination.
Offered fall semester.
GERM 202 - Formerly 100 - German Culture and Conversation (4)
A conversation course that concentrates on popular culture in German-speaking countries. Discussions, presentations, and short papers involved.
Prerequisite: GERM+30 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WI
GERM 301 - Formerly 101 - Introduction to German Studies (4)
This course is an introduction to the debates and methodologies in the field of German Studies, and it explores various media and genres, including literature, film, music, and the visual arts. Development of analytical writing and argumentation in German.
Prerequisite: GERM+100 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
GERM 310 - Formerly 102 - German Literature and Culture (4)
This course examines a topic in further depth and develops analytical writing and argumentation in German. Further development of analytical writing and argumentation in German.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM+101 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WM
GERM 320 - Formerly 110 - Periods in German Literature (4)
The study of the literature from a particular period. Topics vary but include Goethe and the Classic Age, German Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-War German Literature. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German.
Prerequisite: GERM+102 or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
GERM 330 - Formerly 112 - Themes in German Literature (4)
The study of a theme in literature. Topics vary but include The Cities of Vienna and Berlin in Literature, Humor in German Literature, and German-Jewish Literature and Culture. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM+102 or permission of instructor. to be determined.
GERM 340 - Formerly 114 - German Film (4)
The study of German film tradition. Topics vary. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German.
Prerequisite: GERM+102 or permission of instructor. to be determined.
GERM 350 - Formerly 118 - German Studies (4)
The study of German culture as it relates to disciplines such as history, political science, philosophy, music, art history, and media studies. Topics vary. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German.
Prerequisite: GERM+102 or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
GERM 252 - Formerly 130 - German Literature in English (4)
A study of a topic related to German literature. Topics vary but include The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, The Faust Tradition, Humor in German Literature, and German-Jewish Literature and Culture. Readings and discussions in English. No prerequisite.
Offering to be determined.
GERM 254 - Formerly 132 - German Culture in English (4)
The study of a specific topic in German culture. Topics vary. Readings and discussions in English. No prerequisite.
Offering to be determined.
GERM 256 - Formerly 134 - German Film in English (4)
An examination of a theme or period in German cinema. Topics vary but include Film of the Weimar Era, World War II through the Lens of Film, and new German Cinema. Readings and discussions in English. No prerequisite.
Offering to be determined
Fulfills: BI
GERM 250 - Formerly 138 - German Studies in English (4)
The study of German culture as it relates to disciplines such as history, political science, philosophy, music, art history, and media studies. Topics vary. Readings and discussions in English. No prerequisite.
Topics vary. Readings and discussions in English. Offering to be determined.
GERM 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in German (1-4)
A program of study designed to enable students to study areas not offered in other courses. At least one weekly meeting; readings, oral and written reports, and papers. Conducted in German.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
GERM 400 - Formerly 199 - Capstone Project (2)
This course is the capstone experience for the major in German Studies. Students enroll in 2 credits of GERM+199 while taking an upper-level German course such as GERM+110, 112, 114, or 118. The senior project involves guided research that concludes with a substantial paper in German on a topic chosen in consultation with their advisor in German.
[CAP] CAPSTONE Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually.
GERM 102 - Formerly 2 - Elementary German II (4)
An introduction to German, emphasizing communicative skills. Areas such as society, geography, and traditions form the content base. Open to students who have little to no experience in German or who have been assigned to the course after placement examination.
Prerequisite: GERM+1 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
GERM 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate German (4)
A continuation of the development of German language skills, with an emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Exploration of the societies and traditions of the German-speaking countries.
Prerequisite: GERM+2 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall semester.

GRK

GRK 101 - Formerly 1 - Elementary Greek I (4)
An introduction to classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected passages from ancient Greek authors read throughout the course, allowing students to gain a familiarity not only with the language itself but also with important aspects of Greek culture and civilization.
Meets: Four hours class Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
GRK 301 - Formerly 100 - Homer (4)
Readings from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, with a study of their literary and historical significance.
Prerequisite: GRK+30 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
GRK 300 - Formerly 150 - Readings in Greek Authors (2-4)
Extensive readings in a Greek author or authors selected to satisfy students' special areas of interest or need (e.g., selections may come from Greek epic, tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, history, philosophy, or biography). May be taken as an independent study.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: GRK+30 or permission of instructor Offered every fall and spring semester.
GRK 102 - Formerly 20 - Elementary Greek II (4)
An introduction to classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected passages from ancient Greek authors read throughout the course, allowing students to gain a familiarity not only with the language itself but also with important aspects of Greek culture and civilization.
Meets: Four hours class Prerequisite: GRK+1 Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
GRK 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Greek: Prose (4)
Readings from Greek prose works, such as the Histories of Herodotus and Plato's Apology of Socrates, together with a review of grammar and an introduction to Greek thought.
Prerequisite: One year of college Greek or equivalent Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
GRK 299 - Formerly 99 - Greek Across the Curriculum (1-2)
Foreign Languages across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Signature of instructor required.

HIST

HIST 101 - Formerly 1 - History of the United States, From Contact to 1877 (4)
A study of the development of the United States from first contact between Europeans and Native peoples through the Civil war and reconstruction. Covers such issues as the rationale for contact and conquest, the nature of colonial development, the American revolution, the transformation of the republic into a democracy, expansion to the Pacific, industrialization, the development and implications of slavery, and national collapse and reunion.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 305 - Formerly 102 - Colonial America (4)
The social, cultural, economic, and political changes that created a distinctive American society in British North America from first contact through 1760. Special attention to interactions between European, African, and Native Americans and the rise of distinctly American institutions and ideas.
Enrollment priority: given to HIST majors and minors. Recommended: HIST 101 - Formerly 1 - or 15. Offered fall semesters in odd numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 306 - Formerly 104 - The American Revolution (4)
The revolutionary conflict between the American colonies and the British Empire that produced an independent American nation, situating that conflict within dramatic social, cultural, and economic transformations in eastern North America in the late eighteenth century and addressing how contemporaries understood the nature and limits of revolutionary potential in the process of creating a new polity.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 308 - Formerly 105 - The American Civil War (4)
An examination of the breakdown of national consensus and compromise in 19th-century America and the growth of Southern and Northern identities and conflicts. Studies the nature of the slave system and its effects on Southern society and the industrial system and its effects on the North, as well as the Civil War itself, the battles and leaders, and its impact on the two "nations."
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 326 - Formerly 107 - Popular Culture and Its Critics (4)
The intellectual history of American popular culture criticism examines different literatures about popular or "mass" culture and its supposed effects, its production, and its patterns of consumption, drawing on historical critiques in general along with recent analyses of particular genres.
Prerequisite: Some lower division history
HIST 319 - Formerly 108 - The History of Work in America (4)
This course discusses fundamental shifts in the nature of work in America from the 17th through the 20th centuries, alongside the social, cultural and political changes that invested work with different meanings over time. Topics covered include the origins of a slave labor system, the impact of the industrial revolution on both men and women's work, the evolving relationship between workers and the state, the development and impact of an organized labor movement, as well as the "new economy" in postwar America.
Recommended: Recommended HIST 101 - Formerly 1 - ,2,15, or 16. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 312 - Formerly 109 - The United States Since World War II (4)
A study of the major changes in contemporary American society since 1945. Explores the effects of the Cold War, the modern consumer economy, and technology on the institutions and values of the American people.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BH, WI
HIST 355 - Formerly 110 - History of U.S. Foreign Policy (4)
This course will examine U.S. foreign relations and interaction with the wider world during the twentieth century. While necessarily proceeding chronologically, the course will also focus on key junctures and episodes. The course will examine the Untied States in the world with emphasis on such issues as the role of leaders as well as organizations, private and non-state actors, ideology, imperialism, revolution, and the political economy of war. The course will also examine the changing way sin which the world has judged American power, presence & influence over the years. Students will deal with these matters through secondary sources as well as primary sources of policymakers, activists, and intellectuals.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to history majors and minors. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 320 - Formerly 112A - Modern American Legal History (4)
A detailed survey of the major developments in American legal reasoning from the colonial period to the present, of the major legal decisions beginning with Dartmouth College, of the origins and development of the common law, and of the major sensational trials in American history. While the course will consider developments and legal events as far back as the 17th century, the bulk of the course coverage will begin with passage of the 14th Amendment and end in the present day.

Fulfills: BH, WI
HIST 323 - Formerly 115 - African-American Intellectual and Social History (4)
A study of the intellectual arguments and social institutions that have empowered African-American leaders and the masses to maintain and assert their humanity within a world of oppression. Focuses on how gender, race, and class have created diverse ideas and opinions among African-Americans and the methods used by African-American intellectuals to analyze these ideas and opinions.
Offered spring semester in alternate years. Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+170
HIST 313 - Formerly 116 - Atomic Power and American History (4)
This course will examine nuclear power/nuclear weapons from the making and use of the atomic bombs against Japan in 1945 through the Cold War arms race of the subsequent four decades, down to proliferation, WMD, and terrorism of today. Topics will include the arms race, the global 'ban the bomb' movement that paralleled it, nuclear proliferation, the political economy of arms sales, asymmetrical warfare and terrorism, among others. The course will explore the history of the atom bomb, but will also deal with 'atomic culture' through the use of films/videos/songs/etc. throughout.

Fulfills: WI
HIST 327 - Formerly 122 - Presidents and the Presidency in the United States, 1787-Present (4)
A study of the origins and evolution of the American presidency. Focuses on those presidents (Washington, Jackson, Lincoln, F. D. Roosevelt) who had the greatest effect on the office and the slow accretion of changing precedents and policies over time.
Offered fall semester in alternate years.
HIST 318 - Formerly 124 - A History of Business in America (4)
A study of the role of business in American history, emphasizing the significance of the corporation and "big business. Focuses on the corporation between the Civil War and the First World War as the formative period in the development of modern business values, techniques, and institutions.
Offered fall semester in alternate years.
HIST 321 - Formerly 126 - American Women's History (4)
A survey of the social, economic, political, and intellectual history of women in America from the colonial period to the present, with a special emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Considers the diversity of women's experience as a result of race, class, ethnicity, and geographic location. Emphasizes developing skills in the use of primary sources-written, artifactual, and oral. Topics vary annually.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 241 - Formerly 13 - Jewish History from Roman Times to the Enlightenment (4)
An overview of the remarkable history of the Jewish people in post-biblical times, beginning with the Roman occupation of Palestine and concluding with the impact of the Enlightenment on Jewish identity. Among the topics to be studied are the Roman exile of the Jews, the religious traditions and national hopes that accompanied them in the diaspora, the emergence of European and Oriental Jewries, the martyrdom of Jews during the Crusades, the Jewish Golden Age in medieval Spain, the Spanish Inquisition, the European Jewish enlightenment.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: JWST+13
HIST 335 - Formerly 131 - Early Modern Europe (4)
The political, cultural, and spiritual life of Europe as it made the transition to the modern era. Topics will be organized around a series of tensions: the religious versus the secular; science versus superstition; elite versus folk culture; centralized versus local authority, and reason versus faith. Resources include works of social and cultural history as well as the literature of the era and scholarly commentary on it.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 338 - Formerly 135 - Women in Modern European History (4)
A topical survey of the social, economic, and political history of women in Europe from the 15th century to the present, emphasizing work, family, religion, sexuality, feminism, politics, and the state. Examines geographical and cultural variations in women's roles in history. The focus of the course varies annually and may include such topics as class and gender, work and family, women and politics, institutions and power, or rural and urban experiences.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
HIST 336 - Formerly 136 - Foundations of the European Intellectual Tradition (4)
A survey of Western thought from the earliest Greek thinkers through the Renaissance, with emphasis upon the rise of a spirit of free inquiry, the growth of humanism and secularism, and debates between science and religion; tradition and innovation. Considered in their social contexts are the Presocratics, the sophists, Plato and Aristotle, Hellenistic schools, Lucretius and Cicero, early Christians, and representatives of medieval scholasticism and Renaissance humanism. For continuation, see HIST+137.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: CLAS - Formerly CL+136
Fulfills: BH
HIST 337 - Formerly 137 - Modern European Intellectual History (4)
A survey of European thought from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on the great seminal philosophers, scientists, economists, and political theorists. Explores the intellectual movements that have shaped modern consciousness, including the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, Darwinism, psychoanalysis, and existentialism.
Offered annually.
HIST 339 - Formerly 138 - Germany, Nazism, and the Holocaust (4)
This course moves from early German national history, through World War One and the crises of Weimar, in an effort to understand the ascent of Nazism as an ideology and political movement, as well as Hitler's rise to power. Focus then turns to Germany's great crimes; war, conquest, and, especially, the Holocaust. Major themes include: traditions of authoritarianism; the nature and mobilization of German anti-Semitism; and the causes, course, and character of the Holocaust, examined through the experiences of its victims and perpetrators.
Offered in alternate years.
HIST 255 - Formerly 14 - Global History (4)
Focused on exploration of a selected global issue, featuring examination of the historical origins, development, and contemporary manifestation of the selected issue. Topics to be offered include: Terrorism as a species of political violence; Globalisation of world markets; political hegemonies and culture; Utopian imagination.
Offered to be determined.
HIST 382 - Formerly 143 - The History of Modern Britain (4)
A study of the historical and practical forces that have shaped today's Britain, with primary emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The course focuses on various themes-the evolution and role of the monarchy, the emergence of the welfare state, the rise and fall of the Empire, the relationships between Britain and America, as well as Britain and Europe.
Offered fall semester. Same as: PSCI+189
HIST 340 - Formerly 145 - Studies in French History (4)
An in-depth study of some aspects of French history, with topics varying. Topics could include the revolutionary tradition in France, 1789-1968; or French politics, culture, and society, 1945 to the present.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
HIST 211 - Formerly 15 - African-American History: African Origins to 1877 (4)
An examination of the experiences that shaped African-American life from the period of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the end of Reconstruction. Explores how Africans became African-Americans and how they reclaimed their culture, dignity, and humanity as individuals and as a community.
Offered Annually.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 342 - Formerly 153 - Europe, 1914-1945: The World Wars and the Great Dictators (4)
A study of world war and with great dictators in 20th-century Europe. Focuses on the failures of interwar diplomacy and the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union, Italy, Spain, and Germany. Devotes special attention to the Russian revolution, Stalin's terror, the Nazi Holocaust, and the peace settlement of 1945.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 343 - Formerly 154 - Post-1945 Europe (4)
A regional approach to postwar history, examining the tensions, triumphs, and traumas of the European experience. Major topics include the division of Europe into the communist and capitalist "camps," and the memory of the war experience, the influence of and resistance to America and "Americanism," the turmoil of the 1960s protest, terrorism in Italy and Germany, the collapse of the Eastern Bloc, and European integration. Readings from history, literature, and primary sources.
Offered in alternate years.
HIST 341 - Formerly 156 - Studies in Russian History (4)
An in-depth study of a historical theme or topic in Russian history. Topics vary annually and include 19th-century Russian political thought, Russia in Revolution 1905-1939, Medieval Russia, Soviet history, and the Stalin Revolution.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
HIST 212 - Formerly 16 - The Struggle for Equality: African-American History from 1860 to The Present (4)
An examination of the African-American struggle for equality in American society from the Civil War to the present. Topics include the relationship among gender, race, and class; the relationship between African-American leaders and the masses; African-American culture; urban migrations; the evolution of African-American relationships with local, state, and federal government; and contemporary issues.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS, BH, WI
HIST 387 - Formerly 168 - Brussels: A European Mosaic (4)
Brussels offers a rich and diverse cultural mosaic. It is the historic center not only of Belgium's French and Flemish communities but also of the nation's imperial past. As the capital city of today's European Union, Brussels has a wider cultural influence from other EU member states added to its already-rich heritage. Through selected themes or topics, this course studies the history and/or society of Brussels and its developing European mosaic.
Corequisite: SOC+168 Offered fall semester.
HIST 213 - Formerly 17 - Conspiracy Theory in American History (4)
This intermediate-level elective explores the many conspiracy theories that have permeated American culture from the revolutionary era to the present day. Specific theories to be covered include: the Illuminati scare of the 1790s, the Anti-Masonic theories of the mid-1800s, the presidential assassination theories centering on Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, alien abduction theories, HIV/AIDS infection theories, and post-World War II theories concerned with an all-encompassing New World Order. Students will consider these theories in the context of the social, intellectual, political, and cultural forces that accompany them. Students will also learn to analyze critically the validity of different theories by evaluating the evidence and logic used by theorists to build their cases.
HIST 370 - Formerly 171 - History of Sexuality (4)
This research seminar explores some of the major themes and milestones in the modern history of sexuality in the United States and Europe, focusing special attention on the role of medicine in these developments. Following a theoretical introduction to the field, the seminar will address, among other topics, the "invention" of homosexuality and the regulation of prostitution; the impact of thinkers like Krafft-Ebbing, Freud, and Kinsey; and such recent controversies as the new diagnosis of sex addiction and the search for a gay gene. Special emphasis will be placed on evaluating the role of class, race, gender, and ethnicity upon constructions of sexuality. In addition to a substantial research paper, students will be required to write three shorter response papers and deliver class presentations based upon their readings.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 371 - Formerly 172 - Disease in History (4)
Examines medicine and disease in western history, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. It seeks to provide students with the historical knowledge necessary for understanding contemporary responses to disease. In addition to studying the development of specific medical ideas and techniques, a primary focus will be on investigating medicine as a complex social and cultural phenomenon.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 381 - Formerly 176 - Contemporary British Politics (4)
A discussion and an analysis of current issues in British politics with an emphasis on the impact these issues have on the functioning and development of the British political system. Explores such topics as the roles of Parliament, cabinet government, the prime minister, political parties, and interest groups. Outside speakers who are active politicians and field trips to political institutions and events are an integral part of this course. Required of all students and offered in the London program.
Offered fall semester. Same as: PSCI+176
HIST 214 - Formerly 18 - Monsters, Gangsters, and the Great Depression (4)
Using classic gangster and monster films from the 1930s as the primary course content, this course aims to increase students' understanding of a.) the historical realities that influenced the construction of the modern gangster narrative and the modern monster film, b.) the place of the gangster and monster film in the history of film, including the issues of censorship and promulgation of the movie production code, and c.) the gangster and monster films as specific genres, their relationship to other genres of the period including film noire, and the depictions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, urbanism, morality, etc. that defined these genres. Lastly, students will consider how and why these two genres remain influential in the present.

Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 356 - Formerly 181 - The United States and East Asia (4)
This course examines relations between the United States and East Asia (to include China, Japan, and Southeast Asia) from the mid-19th century to the present. While necessarily proceeding chronologically, the course will focus on key junctures and episodes of this complex and evolving relationship. Topics and issues covered include international power and conflict, World Wars, imperialism, revolution, civil war, transnational movement(s), ideology, and cold war. Students will have an opportunity to examine secondary and primary materials and to ask historical questions as well as to draw independent conclusions.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to history majors and minors. Offering to be determined.
HIST 357 - Formerly 183 - The Vietnam War (4)
This course focuses on United States involvement in Vietnam from World War II through the end of the Vietnam War. The course will examine such issues as imperialism, war, revolution, nation building, nationalism, insurgency, and terrorism. Through secondary readings, film, and documents, students will explore the diplomatic, economic, social, and political aspects of this decades-long conflict, and ask historical questions as well as to draw independent conclusions.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to history majors and minors. Offering to be determined.
HIST 388 - Formerly 185 - European Research Seminar (4)
Each student designs and conducts an independent research project on a topic selected in consultation with the Resident Director of the European Semester and approved by the appropriate departmental liaison. The project will stress library research, as well as personal interviews, and may include trips to appropriate EU member states. (Students may also register as an independent study in any approved major)
HIST 301 - Formerly 190 - Selected Topics in History (1-4)
A study of a historical theme or topic that uses a methodological approach or viewpoint not fully explored within the departmental offerings. Topics vary according to student interest and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 302 - Formerly 191 - Special Topics In History: U.S . Diversity (2-4)
A study of a historical theme or topic that uses a methodological approach or viewpoint not fully explored within the departmental offerings. Topics vary according to student interest and faculty expertise, but will consider the construction of social difference, hierarchal power relations and inequalities between groups in the United States.
May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Enrollment priority: Priority given to history majors. Check department listing for offering.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
HIST 192A - Selected Topics In History: In ternational Diversity (2-4)
A study of a historical theme or topic that uses a methodological approach or viewpoint not fully explored within the departmental offerings. Topics vary according to student interest and faculty expertise, but will consider the construction of social difference, hierarchal power relations and inequalities between groups in at least one country other than the United States. These courses will also consider the ways that global forces have shaped the experiences of individuals and groups in countries outside the U.S.
May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Enrollment priority: Priority given to history majors. Check department listing for offering.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 300 - Formerly 196 - Independent Study (1-4)
A tutorial course stressing independent investigation of a topic selected in conference with the instructor and approved by the department. Admission by petition to or by invitation from the department.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration.
HIST 380 - Formerly 198 - Research Tutorial on British History (4)
Each student conducts research and writes a paper on a topic approved by the London program instructor. The project stresses normal library research as well as personal interviews and other out-of-class experiences as part of the research process. Students are urged to consult with their home campus adviser about their topic before going to London.
This seminar cannot be substituted for /History Research Seminar in fulfilling requirements for the history major. To qualify for credit in history, the research done in London must be on a historical topic. This seminar cannot be substituted for HIST 400 - Formerly 194 - /History Research Seminar in fulfilling requirements for the history major. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: PSCI+182
HIST 400 - Formerly 199 - Capstone History Research Seminar (4)
Students concentrate on writing a major research paper on a topic of their choice, under the direction of the seminar instructor, but with the advice of members of the department who possess expertise in the area of a student's interest. Oral presentations and discussion of projects are required.
Maybe repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: HIST+94
Fulfills: WM
HIST 102 - Formerly 2 - History of the United States, 1876-Present (4)
A survey of the development of American society from Reconstruction to the present. Treats major events, such as the Great Depression, and explores significant themes, such as industrialization and world power.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 230 - Formerly 20 - The Ancient World: Greece (4)
An introduction to the history of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, including its artistic, social, economic, religious, military, and political developments, and the evolution of the basic concepts that have influenced Western thought. Special attention is given to original sources, with readings from the Greek historians and consideration of archaeology.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. Same as: CLAS - Formerly CL+20
Fulfills: DIT, BH
HIST 232 - Formerly 21 - The Ancient World: Rome (4)
An introduction to Roman history, covering the rise of Rome, Roman imperialism, social stresses, the transition from Republic to Empire, imperial civilization, the rise of Christianity, and the decline of the Roman Empire. Offering varies.
Same as: CLAS - Formerly CL+21
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 107 - Formerly 3 - Contemporary Issues in World History (4)
An introduction to historical thinking via contemporary issues. Each semester a set of issues is selected for investigation in detail. Issues might include ecological problems, racism, modernization, democracy, fundamentalism, totalitarianism, feminism, revolution, the welfare state, sexuality, and multiculturalism.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 236 - Formerly 30 - Medieval Europe (4)
A study of the development of European civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Emphasizes political development from the Germanic monarchies to the emergence of dynastic states, feudalism, Christian philosophy, and the development of the church, including economic, social, and cultural trends.
Alternate Years.
HIST 242 - Formerly 39 - History of England to 1714 (4)
A survey of English history from the Roman invasion to Queen Anne. Traces the development of feudalism, the monarchy, parliament, religious conflict, and the pre-industrial economy. Describes the historical background to early English literature.
Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 243 - Formerly 41 - History of Britain since 1715 (4)
Traces the rise and decline of British power in modern times. Covers the French wars, the American War of Independence (from the British perspective), the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, Darwinism, the rise and fall of Victorianism, the world wars, the welfare state, immigration, and integration with Europe. The course emphasizes literary and cultural history and provides essential background for students of English literature.
Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 244 - Formerly 45 - Modern French History (4)
Major themes and events in French history, starting with the "Age of Absolutism" and the reign of the Bourbons and ending with contemporary French society. The French revolution and its enduring impact on French politics and culture will have a central place in the course, as will France's status as a world power in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Offered in alternate years.
HIST 245 - Formerly 47 - Modern German History (4)
The politics and culture of Germany in the modern era. Themes include the development of national identity, the emergence of Germany as a nation-state, the failure of the Weimar Republic, the rise to power and rule of the Nazis, postwar division of Germany, and reunification.
Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 246 - Formerly 50 - History of Imperial Russia (4)
The Russian Empire from the reign of Peter the Great (1689-1725) through the fall of the Romanov dynasty in the February Revolution. Recurring themes include the strengths and weaknesses of autocracy as a political system; the role of serfdom in Russia's development and underdevelopment; the polarization of Russian elite society into revolutionaries and conservatives; the role of the cities and urban populations in Russian culture, politics, and the economy; Russia's complex relationship with the West; and the formation of Russia as a multinational empire.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 247 - Formerly 51 - History of the USSR (4)
The course begins with the developments leading to the 1917 Russian Revolution-which has been called the greatest event of the twentieth century. It then traces the tumultuous development of Soviet and Russian history up to the present. Emphases include: the social origins of the Russian Revolution; how a great revolution made in the name of social democracy gave rise to one-party rule; and how this set in motion a chain of events which placed the Soviet Union on a new path of historical development leading eventually to its own demise in 1991 and the ensuing recasting of politics and society.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 271 - Formerly 56 - Environmental History (4)
This course explores some of the major issues in the history of human interaction with and concern for the environment, from ancient times to today. We will examine changing notions of "nature" and "wilderness"; key moments in the history of human impact on the environment and in the history of ecology; and the origins and development of modern environmentalist movements.
Alternate Years. Same as: ESS+56
Fulfills: BH
HIST 274 - Formerly 57 - History of Physics in the 20th Century (4)
Origins of relativity and quantum mechanics. Contributions of Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, Schrödinger and Dirac. Development of atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Current views of cosmology and unified theories. Topics include conceptual problems in quantum mechanics, nuclear energy and weapons, the nature of physical reality, physics and society, physics as an intellectual pursuit.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
HIST 272 - Formerly 58 - History of Biology in the 20th Century (4)
History of the major developments in genetics, evolution/ecology, biochemistry/molecular biology, and immunology in the 20th century. Social, cultural, and political contexts of advances in the life sciences. Topics include biology as big science, biology and the shaping of modern medicine, biology and environmentalism, and human evolution and society.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 273 - Formerly 59 - Darwin and Darwinism: The History of Evolutionary Biology (4)
A study of the historical development of evolutionary biology. The course centers on the science and scientific creativity of Charles Darwin. The development of evolutionary thought to the present is examined as well as the social, political, and cultural contexts of Darwinism.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
HIST 270 - Formerly 60 - History of Science (4)
A study of key issues in the history of major scientific concepts. Emphasizes an understanding of how scientific knowledge grows, the nature of creativity in science, the influence of science in shaping modern society, scientific progress and its problems. Studies foundations of the scientific revolution and emphasizes the historical development of central theories in modern biology, chemistry, and physics.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, BI
HIST 259 - Formerly 61 - Modern Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
A survey of Sub-Saharan African history from the 19th century to the present. Stresses pre-colonial African society, European imperialism, the revolt against imperial domination, post-colonial Africa, and contemporary issues.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 256 - Formerly 65 - History of the Islamic Middle East, 600-1800 (4)
A broad survey of the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam in the early seventh century C.E. to the 19th century. Emphasizes major transformations in the region's history during this period, including the mission of Muhammad, the early Islamic conquests, the formation of classical Islamic culture and society, the demise of the universal empire and the rise of regional states in the 10th century, the impact of the Crusades and the Mongol invasions, and the reconsolidation of political and social order under Ottoman and Safavid rule.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 257 - Formerly 66 - History of the Modern Middle East (4)
A survey of Middle East history in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include the decline of Ottoman power and the Tanzimat reforms, the Eastern Question and European rivalry in the Mediterranean, the rise of nationalism in the region, the impact of the First and Second World Wars, the establishment of the state of Israel, the struggle for independence in the Arab world, the Arab-Israeli conflict, superpower rivalry in the Middle East during the Cold War, and the conflict between pan-Islamic forces and secular responses to the crisis of modernity.
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
HIST 104 - Formerly 7 - European History 1492-1789: Reformation, Enlightenment, and Revolution (4)
A survey of European history from Columbus to Napoleon. Emphasizes broad themes, such as European exploration, the rise of absolute monarchy, the triumph of parliamentary government in England, the culture of the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 258 - Formerly 70 - Modern Jewish History (4)
A study of the social and cultural experiences of Jews and Jewish communities from the Enlightenment to the present. Explores the diversity of Jewish experience in Western Europe, Russia, America, the Arab lands, and Israel, beginning with a survey of the major developments in European and American history that have shaped Jewish identities.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: DIT
HIST 238 - Formerly 71 - Crusade and Jihad Then and Now (4)
This course investigates and compares the religious origins of the ideas of crusade and jihad. In both cases a devotional practice became militarized; we will discuss how these practices became militarized both theologically and practically. We consider the contested spaces of the Mediterranean, including Jerusalem, that fostered the development of these forms of religious warfare. We will then examine how these ideas became transformed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in movements and events as varied as romanticism, the Red Cross, colonialism, World War I, Pan-Arabism, and Wahhabism. All of these reimagined, idealized, and represented the medieval world (Latin or Arabic) so as to promote radically different agendas.
Offered Fall semester in even-numbered years. Same as: REL+71
Fulfills: BH
HIST 261 - Formerly 75 - Latin America Since Independence (4)
A study of the revolt against imperial rule, the problems of independence, and the impact of revolution upon Latin American politics and society in the 20th century, beginning with a broad overview of the impact of Iberian and Indian civilization upon Latin America. Discusses Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico in greater detail than the rest of Latin America.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 105 - Formerly 8 - European History 1789-1989: Nationalism, Totalitarianism, and Rebirth (4)
A survey of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the collapse of Communism. Emphasizes such topics as German and Italian unification, imperialism, the phenomenon of total war, the Bolshevik revolution, Fascism, the Cold War and European revival after 1945, and the collapse of Communism.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH
HIST 262 - Formerly 80 - History of Asia: Asian Traditions (4)
A study of Asia prior to 1850 focusing on the development of political, economic, social, and cultural institutions.
Offering to be determined.
HIST 264 - Formerly 81 - Modern China:From Opium Wars to the World's Workshop (4)
This course examines political, cultural and economic transformations in China from the 19th century to the present. Covering the Opium Wars, the Taiping Rebellion, the collapse of the Qing Dynasty, Civil War, the Communist Revolution, the Cold War, globalization and China's rise at the end of the 20th century to become the world's workshop, this course will explore what has been for China the most tumultuous and arguably the most transformative century of its nearly four thousand year existence.
To be Determined.
Fulfills: DIT, BH
HIST 201 - Formerly 90 - Selected Topics in History (2-4)
A study of a historical theme or topic at the intermediate level that uses a methodological approach or viewpoint not fully explored within departmental offerings. Topics vary.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. To be determined.
HIST 210 - Formerly 94 - Historical Research Methods (4)
Introduction to the research methods historians use to gather information and interpret historical processes. Practical experience in exploring a variety of primary sources including oral history and historical archives. Introduction to historical reading and reasoning.
Offered annually
Fulfills: WM

HIST - Formerly HISTG

HISTG 807 - The Classical Tradition in the 19th and 20th Centuries (3)
This course traces the influence and transformation of the classical Greek and Roman traditions though some of the seminal social movements and thinkers of modern times. It considers how even the most innovative and radical trends in modern politics, literature, philosophy, psychology, and anthropology have engaged in an extended conversation with the past. No prior knowledge of classical antiquity is required.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 827 - Topics in Intellectual History (3)
Topics in intellectual history vary with instructor interest and expertise.
Course may be repeated.

HOST - Formerly HOLST

HOST 311 - Formerly HOLST 110 - Topics in Holocaust Studies (4)
This course provides an interdisciplinary platform to explore current topics in Holocaust Studies.
Course may be repeated.
HOST 300 - Formerly HOLST 150 - Independent Study in Holocaust Studies (1-4)
This course will provide students with an opportunity to do independent research in Holocaust Studies: library research on a particular topic; analyzing and contextualizing original documents and artifacts that have been donated to Holocaust research centers and related archives. Students might also elect to design an interview study of survivors, children of survivors, or Holocaust refugees, or make an in-depth study of writers, artists, musicians who incorporate Holocaust themes into their works. Since Holocaust Studies is interdisciplinary, this course will allow students to engage in research that spans more than one discipline.
May be repeated as topic varies, but no more than four credits of Independent Study may be applied to the Minor in Holocaust Studies without the approval of the program director. Signatures required: instructor and director of Holocaust Studies minor. Prerequisite: One course in Holocaust Studies. Offered every semester.
HOST 233 - Formerly HOLST 33 - Perspectives on the Holocaust (4)
This course provides multiple perspectives on the Holocaust, the near extermination of European Jewry and the brutal persecution of an extended mosaic of victims. As a watershed event, the Holocaust has radically affected our fundamental conceptions of human nature, the dimensions of evil, the existence of God, the power of bearing literary witness, the moral and political outlook for the future. Readings span the disciplines of history, psychology, literature, theology, and political science, each providing its own distinctive illumination. Course requirements include exams, papers, journal entries, and a field trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
Offered spring semester. Same as: JWST+33 ARLT - Formerly ARLET+337
Fulfills: BI, DIT

HON

HON 101 - Formerly 10 - Honors Colloquium (1)
A required colloquium for all first-year students in the Baldwin Honors program. Each year the colloquium will center on a single theme. The colloquium involves discussion of pertinent readings as well as activities and events outside the classroom (e.g. museum exhibitions, performances, site visits, and civic engagement experiences)
Required for all first-year honors students.
HON 397 - Formerly 108 - Pre-Honors Colloquium (2)
Recommended for juniors planning to undertake specialized honors in their senior year. Topics discussed during the weekly colloquium include finding, defining, and sustaining a topic, research methodologies, and approaches to research writing in the various liberal arts disciplines and interdisciplinary areas. In consultation with a faculty adviser, each student constructs an annotated bibliography and produces a thesis prospectus and timetable. The colloquium is organized by the director of the honors program; faculty members from a variety of disciplines join the seminar to lead the discussion on particular topics.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: GPA of 3.1 by the beginning of the spring semester junior year. Offered spring semester.
HON 410 - Formerly 109 - Specialized Honors I (4)
Open to students enrolled in specialized honors who wish to earn credit for their work.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester.
HON 201 - Formerly 11 - Honors Seminar (4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught. Enrollment priority given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program.
Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors program required for registration. Offered both semesters.
HON 411 - Formerly 110 - Specialized Honors II (4)
Open to students enrolled in specialized honors who wish to earn credit for their work.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered spring semester.
HON 202 - Formerly 12 - Honors Seminar: Natural Sciences (2-4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught.
Fulfills a breath requirement in the Natural Sciences. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment priority: Given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors Program required for registration. Both Semesters.
Fulfills: BNS
HON 203 - Formerly 13 - Honors Seminar: Social Sciences (2-4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught.
Fulfills a breath requirement in the Social Sciences. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment priority: Priority given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors program required for registration.
Fulfills: BSS
HON 204 - Formerly 14 - Honors Seminar: Humanities (2-4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught.
Fulfills a breath requirement in the Humanities. Course may be repeated as topic varies. Enrollment priority: Priority given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors program required for registration.
Fulfills: BH
HON 205 - Formerly 15 - Honors Seminar: Arts (2-4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught.
Fulfills a breath requirement in the Arts. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors program required for registration.
Fulfills: BA
HON 300 - Formerly 150 - Honors Tutorial (2-4)
Honors students may propose to count an independent study as one of their Honors courses. The independent study may involve research, intensive reading, studio or performance as appropriate to the field or discipline. Proposals must be reviewed and approved for Honors by the advisory committee.
Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors Program required for registration.
HON 206 - Formerly 16 - Honors Seminar: Interdisciplinary (2-4)
Topics to be determined by the instructors, but will be distinctive from regular curricular course offerings. Seminars may be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or team taught.
Fulfills the interdisciplinary breath requirement. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority given to students in the Baldwin Honors Program. Signature of the Director of the Baldwin Honors Program required for registration.
Fulfills: BI
HON 299 - Formerly 99 - Honors Across the Curriculum (1-2)
Honors students may take any course in the general curriculum as an Honors course with the prior agreement of the instructor by adding a one-credit module to the course in which the student completes additional work beyond the assigned work in the course. The additional work may consist of reading, writing, research, experimental or creative work as appropriate. The availability of this option for any course is at the discretion of the faculty member.
Permission of the instructor and the Director of the Baldwin Honors Program required for registration.

HUM

HUM 211 - Formerly 11 - Classical Antiquity (4)
The courses in the Western Humanities sequence offer rich possibilities for study. While the time frame for each course (Classical period, Middle Ages, Renaissance to Enlightenment, Modernity) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, BI
HUM 213 - Formerly 12 - The European Middle Ages (4)
The courses in the Western Humanities sequence offer rich possibilities for study. While the time frame for each course (Classical period, Middle Ages, Renaissance to Enlightenment, Modernity) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, BI
HUM 215 - Formerly 13 - Forms of Humanism: Renaissance to Enlightenment (4)
The courses in the Western Humanities sequence offer rich possibilities for study. While the time frame for each course (Classical period, Middle Ages, Renaissance to Enlightenment) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
HUM 217 - Formerly 14 - The Modern Age in the West: Self and Society in the West, 1848 to the Present (4)
The courses in the Western Humanities sequence offer rich possibilities for study. While the time frame for each course (Classical period, Middle Ages, Renaissance to Enlightenment, Modernity) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BI
HUM 205 - Formerly 15 - Humanism and Cultural Studies (2-4)
Examines trans-cultural influences in the humanities that are not necessarily located in a specific place. Topics may include, but are not limited to, indigenous cultures, LGBT cultures, labor and the humanities, cultures of disabilities.
May be repeated as topics change.
Fulfills: BH, BI, DUS
HUM 230 - Formerly 16 - The Humanities and Islam (4)
The courses in the Comparative Humanities group offer rich possibilities for study. While the cultural and geographical frame for each course is a constant (Islam/Middle East, Africa/African-American, Asia, Latin America) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester. Offered once every four years in the fall semester. Next offered fall 2007.
HUM 232 - Formerly 17 - The Humanities and Africa (4)
The courses in the Comparative Humanities group offer rich possibilities for study. While the cultural and geographical frame for each course (Islam/Middle East, Africa/African-American, Asia, Latin America) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester. Offered once every four years in the fall semester.
HUM 234 - Formerly 18 - The Humanities and Asia (4)
The courses in the Comparative Humanities group offer rich possibilities for study. While the cultural and geographical frame for each course (Islam/Middle East, Africa/African-American, Asia, Latin America) is constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty who currently teach the course. Please check the course announcements each semester. Offered once every four years in the fall semester.
HUM 236 - Formerly 19 - The Humanities and Latin America (4)
The courses in the Comparative Humanities group offer rich possibilities for study. While the cultural and geographical frame for each course (Islam/Middle East, Africa/African-American, Asia, Latin America) is a constant, the emphasis on specific themes and materials will be determined by the faculty currently teaching the course. Please check the course announcements each semester. Offered once every four years in the fall semester.
HUM 203 - Formerly 20 - Current Issues in the Humanities (2-4)
A multidisciplinary introduction to ideas, forms, values, and forces that affect our lives in such fields as anthropology, art, classics, history, literature, music, philosophy, religion and allied areas of study. Each half-semester offering of the course presents a topic in contemporary cultures as represented in materials from a variety of disciplines. Topics have included "What Is/Was Postmodernism?", "Politics and the Humanities", "Globalism and the Humanities", "Crossing-Disciplines: Science and the Humanities", "The Body: Materiality and Metaphor", "Freedom", and "The Family".
Course may be repeated. Offered first half of spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, BI
HUM 201 - Formerly 21 - Culture and Exchange (2)
This course introduces students to the idea of exchange as the basis for all human interaction by comparing ideas about and principles of exchange through different disciplinary lenses: exchange in the arts (patronage, sales, publication, criticism), economics (barter and money economics, credit), anthropology (gift-giving, marriage, ritual) and linguistics (language per se) are all possible avenues of investigation and comparison.
Offering to be determined.

INST

INST 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study (1-4)
An independent investigation of a topic selected in conference with the instructor and approved by the department. Admission by petition to or upon invitation of a department. May be repeated for credit with a different department or in the same department with departmental approval. Registration for this course applies only if a department does not offer a departmental course in independent study. Projects not directly within the discipline of the instructor's department must receive approval from the Dean's Council.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required at time of registration.

INTC - Formerly INTR

INTC 200 - Formerly INTR 50 - Internship project (2-4)
Requirements are 140 hours of satisfactory performance for an approved four-credit internship project and 70 hours for a two-credit internship projcet, a reflective journal, job supervisor evaluations, and an interpretive paper graded by a faculty evaluator. To qualify for internship credit, a student must have completed at least eight credits in a department or program to which the internship experience is being related. At most eight credits in internship may be counted toward the B.A. degree.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
INTC 200 - Formerly INTR 50SA - INTERNSHIP PROJECT (2-4)
No description is available for this course. Signature of Internship Director Required.

ITAL

ITAL 101 - Formerly 1 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Italian I (4)
An introduction to the Italian spoken and written language. The course covers the basics of the Italian language through videos, songs, interactive practice in the classroom and weekly on-line work. Emphasis is on oral expression and listening comprehension.
Students are encouraged to take ITAL+20 the following spring semester. Offered fall semester.
ITAL 205 - Formerly 100 - Italian for Business (4)
Emphasis on commercial situations and terminology used for business transaction in Italy today. Students will learn how to effectively communicate in job related settings. Some topics include job interviews and presentations, advertising, writing formal letters, resumes, faxes, emails, banking, import-export, etc. The goal is to prepare students for the Italian CIC (Certificato di Italiano Commerciale intermedio) which can be used with firms that conduct business with Italy.
Prerequisite: ITAL+30. Offered in alternate years.
ITAL 301 - Formerly 101 - Italian Conversation and Contemporary Culture (4)
This course is designed to increase fluency in conversation on current themes and trends in Italy through the use of cultural materials and media such as newspapers, magazines, songs, internet, film and television. Oral presentations, skits, and situational activities will be incorporated.
Prerequisite: ITAL+30 Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: DIT
ITAL 302 - Formerly 102 - Contemporary Italian Cinema (4)
Viewing of contemporary Italian films with lectures and discussions on topics such as society, media, life styles, family, and politics. Oral presentations and short papers. Conducted in Italian.
Prerequisite: ITAL+30 Offered in alternate years.
ITAL 304 - Formerly 103 - From Book to Screen (4)
The course focuses on the analysis of selected Italian masterpieces of the nineteenth and twentieth century and their subsequent "translation" onto the screen by Italian filmmakers. It also serves as an introduction to the major literary movements through the works of predominant writers and film directors. Conducted in Italian.
Prerequisite: ITAL+30 or equivalent Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: BH, WI
ITAL 350 - Formerly 111 - Selected Topics: (2-4)
A study of a topic or topics in Italian culture or literature not covered by the current offerings of the French and Italian Department. Offered in English. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Students may elect a two-credit module stopping at mid-semester.
Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
ITAL 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Italian (2-4)
Students investigate a chosen topic in Italian literature or language and culture under the guidance of the Italian department faculty. Oral and written reports.
Course may be repeated. Meets: Weekly. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 credits of work in Italian with a B average. Every semester and during the summer term abroad.
ITAL 102 - Formerly 20 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Italian II (4)
A continuation of ITAL+1, this course emphasizes reading and writing skills and completes the basic study of Italian grammar. Videos, songs, interactive practice in the classroom, and weekly on-line work.
Prerequisite: ITAL+1 Offered each semester.
ITAL 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Italian (4)
A continuation of ITAL+20, this course aims to increase fluency in spoken and written Italian through on-line activities, class discussions, projects, presentations, and written assignments. It also covers difficult points of grammar and briefly reviews fundamental structures
Prerequisite: ITAL+20 Offered each semester.
ITAL 299 - Formerly 99 - Italian Across The Curriculum (4)
Foreign Language Across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ITAL+30

JWST

JWST 320 - Formerly 112 - Seminar in Jewish Studies (4)
An in-depth study of a specific religious or philosophical aspect of Judaism, with an emphasis on the critical analysis of primary sources and traditional texts.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester. Same as: REL+112
Fulfills: BH
JWST 220 - Formerly 12 - The Jewish Experience: An Introduction to Judaism (4)
A survey of the basic religious doctrines, ritual practice, and philosophical schools of the Jewish religion, from biblical times to the present. The course includes analysis of Jewish theology, rational philosophy, mysticism, messianism, religious ceremonies, family life-cycle, and rites of passage, as well as universal concepts.
Offered spring semester. Same as: REL+12
Fulfills: BH
JWST 241 - Formerly 13 - Jewish History from Roman Times to the Enlightenment (4)
An overview of the remarkable history of the Jewish people in post-biblical times, beginning with the Roman occupation of Palestine and concluding with the impact of the Enlightenment on Jewish identity. Among the topics to be studied are: the Roman exile of the Jews, the religious traditions and national hopes that accompanied them in the diaspora, the emergence of European and Oriental Jewries, the martyrdom of Jews during the Crusades, the Jewish Golden Age in medieval Spain, the Spanish Inquisition, the European Jewish enlightenment.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: HIST+13
JWST 224 - Formerly 30 - Selected Topics in Jewish Studies (4)
An intensive study of special topics in this field.
Course may be repeated. Offered fall semester.
JWST 233 - Formerly 33 - Perspectives on the Holocaust (4)
This course provides multiple perspectives on the Holocaust, the near extermination of European Jewry and the brutal persecution of an extended mosaic of victims. As a watershed event, the Holocaust has radically affected our conceptions of human nature, the dimensions of evil, the existence of God, the power of bearing literary witness, the moral and political outlook for the future. Readings span the disciplines of history, psychology, literature, theology, and political science, each providing its own distinctive illumination. Course requirements include exams, papers, journal entries, and a field trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
Offered spring semester. Same as: HOST - Formerly HOLST+33
Fulfills: BI, DIT

LAST

LAST 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Latin American Studies (2-4)
An opportunity to do advanced study on a topic or topics of interest to the student in the field of Latin American studies, selected in conference with the instructor(s) and approved by the Latin American Studies Committee.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.

LAT

LAT 101 - Formerly 1 - Elementary Latin I (4)
An introduction to Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with appropriate readings from original writings of ancient authors. Attention is given to aspects of Roman language, history, and culture that have strongly influenced Western thought.
Offered fall semester.
LAT 202 - Formerly 100 - Roman Poetry (4)
Readings chosen from the love-poetry of Catullus and Ovid; Ovid's Metamorphoses (one of our major sources of classical mythology); Horace's Odes and Satires; and Lucretius. Consideration of the literary and cultural backgrounds of the works and their influence.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: LAT+30 or placement based on exam Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
LAT 330 - Formerly 110 - Vergil (4)
Readings from Vergil's Aeneid and study of its literary and historical contexts.
Prerequisite: LAT+30 or placement based on exam Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
LAT 320 - Formerly 120 - Roman Prose (4)
Readings chosen from Cicero's speeches from the courtroom or the Senate; the letters of Cicero and Pliny; and the histories of Sallust, Livy, Suetonius, and Tacitus. With study of their historical contexts, prose style, rhetorical techniques, and influence.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: LAT+30 or placement based on exam Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
LAT 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study (2-4)
Readings in Latin authors chosen to satisfy students' special interests. Weekly meetings, conducted as a tutorial, for translation, with oral and written reports.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: LAT+30 and permission of instructor Offered fall and spring semester.
LAT 102 - Formerly 2 - Elementary Latin II (4)
An introduction to Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with appropriate readings from original writings of ancient authors. Attention is given to aspects of Roman language, history, and culture that have strongly influenced Western thought.
Prerequisite: LAT+1 Offered spring semester.
LAT 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Latin: Prose (4)
Readings from Latin prose authors, such as Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero; consideration of Roman culture together with review of the language.
Prerequisite: One year of college Latin or placement based on exam Offered fall semester.
LAT 299 - Formerly 99 - Latin Across The Curriculum (1-2)
Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
May be taken again with a different cognate course. Prerequisite: LAT+30 or equivalent and signature of language instructor. Corequisite: Concurrent registration in a cognate course.

LING

LING 101 - Formerly 10 - Language, Communication, and Culture (4)
An introduction to the role of language and its various forms of transmission in the construction of individual and cultural identity. Topics include language and gender, language and ethnicity, language and social structures.
Recommended: ANTH 104 - Formerly 4 - as a concurrent or prior course. Offered annually.
Fulfills: BSS
LING 220 - Formerly 105 - History and Structure of the English Language (4)
A study of the development of English from Anglo-Saxon to its present status as a global language. Examines the historical development of theories attempting to explain English, its styles, dialects, and literatures. Recommended: LING+10.

Fulfills: BH
LING 302 - Formerly 120 - Linguistic Theory and Method (4)
A study of descriptive and prescriptive approaches to language. Synchronic and diachronic linguistics. Phonetics and phonemics. Morphology, syntagmology, and semantics.
Recommended: LING 101 - Formerly 10 - or 105 as a prior course. Offering to be determined.
LING 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Linguistic Studies (2-4)
Experiential fieldwork or other research in theoretical, applied linguistics, or language teaching, developed in consultation with a member of the linguistic studies faculty. Open only to linguistic studies minors.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
LING 201 - Formerly 50 - Topics in the Study of Language (2)
The discipline of linguistics is concerned with language in all of the different ways it functions. When the material and approaches of any academic field are applied to language, that application is within the purview of linguistics. This course will expose students to some of the many areas in which language can be the topic, chosen from the following: philosophy, sociology, neurophysiology, cognitive and developmental psychology, foreign languages, evolutionary and cultural anthropology. It will draw on the expertise of professors from a variety of departments, each 'visiting scholar,' so to speak, presenting material from his or her own field as it intersects with the study of language.
Offering to be determined.

MAT

MAT 836 - Formerly 836 - Conservation Biology (3)
An exploration of the major principles of conservation biology-the study of maintaining biological diversity. We will examine the foundations of conservation biology, its biological concepts (principles and theories), and the applications of such concepts to preserving biodiversity. This course emphasizes the application of evolutionary and ecological theory to the preservation of threatened species, but also considers economic, political and philosophical perspectives. Classroom activities will facilitate understanding of the principles of conservation biology, and field trips will provide direct exposure to the practice of conservation biology. Appropriate for students in biology and environmental studies.
Meets: Three hours class. Prerequisite: (BIOL+7 or BIOL+9)

MATH

MATH 310 - Formerly 100 - Foundations of Higher Mathematics (4)
This course serves as a transition from calculus to the more abstract reasoning needed in advanced math courses. The emphasis of the course is on understanding and applying definitions and theorems, recognizing and constructing valid arguments, and communicating mathematical ideas both orally and in writing. Topics include basic logic and set theory, cardinality and counting, and elementary topics from analysis and algebra.
Meets: weekly for 195 minutes Prerequisite: MATH+8 Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
MATH 303 - Formerly 103 - Linear Algebra (4)
Matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, applications, and additional topics chosen from numerical methods for solving linear equations, canonical forms, quadratic forms.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+17 or MATH+100. Offered spring semester.
MATH 315 - Formerly 104 - Differential Equations (4)
Ordinary differential equations: basic existence and uniqueness theory, exact solutions and the behavior of solutions for different classes of equations, simple models and applications; additional topics chosen from systems of differential equations, physical and biological models, nonlinear systems, numerical methods for solution, transorm methods, and partial differential equations.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+17 Offered spring semester.
MATH 211 - Formerly 11 - Applications of Mathematics (4)
A study of applications of different branches of mathematics, including calculus, to various current, real-world problems. The course will introduce techniques of mathematical modeling involved in the analysis of meaningful and practical problems arising in disciplines other than mathematics including physical and computational sciences, operations research, engineering, and the management and life sciences. Specific topics will vary with the instructor and student interest. Case studies will be used extensively. While mathematical software and/or programming may be used, no prior experience is necessary.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: MATH+7 or permission of instructor. Fall Semester.
Fulfills: Q
MATH 325 - Formerly 125 - Mathematical Physics (4)
An introduction to methods used in solving problems in physics and other sciences. Calculus of variations and extremum principles. Orthogonal functions and Sturm-Liouville problems. Fourier series. Series solutions of differential equations. The partial differential equations of physics. Transform and Green's function methods of solution. Nonlinear equations and chaos theory.
Prerequisite: MATH+104 and PHYS+11. Offered fall semester on even years. Same as: PHYS+125
MATH 330 - Formerly 127 - Real and Complex Analysis I (4)
Topics include properties of the real and complex number systems, introduction to point set topology, limits of sequences and functions, continuity, differentiation of real and complex functions, and infinite series and uniform convergence.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+17, MATH+100. Offered spring semester on odd years.
MATH 320 - Formerly 129 - Probability (4)
The fundamentals of probability theory including discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, conditional probability and independence, joint probability distributions, expected values, moment generating functions, laws of large numbers, and limit theorems. Special topics selected from random walks, Markov chains, and applications as time permits.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+17 and MATH+100. Offered fall semester in odd years. Same as: MAT+866
MATH 213 - Formerly 13 - Introduction to Logic (4)
A study of the principles and methods of correct reasoning. Emphasizes the analysis of arguments, informal fallacies, and elementary deductive logic.
Meets: Weekly for 65 minute periods. Offered fall semester. Same as: PHIL+13
Fulfills: BI, BH
MATH 335 - Formerly 144 - Abstract Algebra (4)
A survey of modern algebra. Integral domains, fields, groups, rings, ideals, applications.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+100 and either a C- or better in MATH+103 or concurrent registration in MATH+103 Offered spring semester on even years.
MATH 300 - Formerly 155 - Independent Study in Mathematics (1-4)
An independent investigation of a topic selected in conference with the instructor and approved by the department. Admission by petition to or by invitation of the department.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MATH 250 - Formerly 17 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4)
Extending the concepts of calculus from two to three or more dimensions: partial differentiation, multiple integration; analytic geometry in three dimensions, vectors, line and surface integrals, applications.
Meets: weekly for three 65-minute periods. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+8 Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: Q
MATH 400 - Formerly 171 - Seminar in Mathematics (4)
Topics to be chosen by instructor. Work involves reading research articles, writing one or more papers, and making classroom presentations.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Meets: 150 minutes weekly Prerequisite: Senior standing and MATH+100. Offered spring semester.
MATH 340 - Formerly 198 - Special Topics in Mathematics (4)
A selection of special topics in mathematics, typically one or two offered each semester. Topics include but are not restricted to: Number Theory, Discrete Mathematics, Dynamical Systems, Real and Complex Analysis II, Numerical Methods, Topology, Symbolic Logic.
Course may be repeated.
MATH 101 - Formerly 1A - The Principles and Practices o f Statistics (4)
The use and misuse of data and statistical methods has become increasingly common in all aspects of modern life. This course emphasizes evaluating and interpreting statistics as encountered in the media and popular press with the goal of creating educated, informed consumers of statistical information. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to analyze graphical presentations of data; understand the role of probability in quantifying uncertainty and in making assertions; and evaluate the design and execution of data collection techniques. They will be alert to common mistakes found in statistical work such as assuming that correlation implies causation or that statistical significance implies practical importance. Students cannot receive credit for A if they have already taken .
Prerequisite: Pre-Requisite: College Writing. Dependent on interest.
Fulfills: Q, WI
MATH 115 - Formerly 2 - Introduction to Calculus (4)
A survey of calculus topics: limits, differentiation, integration, extreme values, curve tracing, partial derivatives, law of growth, with an emphasis on applications. Designed for students in the biological and social sciences.
Meets: 195 minutes weekly. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: Q
MATH 227 - Formerly 27 - Intermediate Statistics (4)
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence designed to prepare students to use statistics for data analysis. The course makes use of SPSS and builds on the foundation gained in Math 3. It covers additional methods of statistical inference with a focus on analysis of variance and multiple regression. Understanding the design and analysis of published statistical studies that use these methods is an integral part of the course.
Meets: weekly for 150 minutes. Prerequisite: MATH+3 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: Q, WI
MATH 117 - Formerly 3 - Introductory Statistics (4)
This course is designed to enable you to use statistics for data analysis and to understand the use of statistics in the media. The course makes use of SPSS, a widely-used statistics package for the computer. Course topics include graphical and tabular presentation of data, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and shape, linear transformations of data, correlation, regression, basic probability and the normal probability model, sampling, t-tests, and one-way analysis of variance.
Meets: 150 minutes weekly, with an additional weekly 50-minute recitation Offered every semester. Same as: MAT+861
Fulfills: Q
MATH 111 - Formerly 4 - Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (4)
This is a quantitative literacy course designed to improve the level of quantitative awareness of students using practical situations to motivate the study of mathematics. The goals of this course are to foster an appreciation of mathematics and to develop thinking and reasoning skills. In particular, students will locate, critically read, and evaluate information to solve problems, they will critically evaluate quantitatively based arguments, and they will represent and solve real-world problems using appropriate mathematical models.
Offered Annually.
Fulfills: Q
MATH 150 - Formerly 7 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4)
Functions, limits, continuity, and differentiation and its applications; introduction to integration including definite and indefinite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus; analysis of graphical and numerical information.
No student may receive credit for both AP calculus AB or BC and MATH 150 - Formerly 7 - . Meets: 195 minutes weekly, with an additional weekly 50-minute recitation Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics including trigonometry. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: Q
MATH 151 - Formerly 8 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4)
Integration, including techniques of integration, improper integrals, and applications; polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor polynomials, sequences and series.
No student may receive 8 credits for AP calculus BC and MATH 151 - Formerly 8 - . Meets: 195 minutes weekly Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+7 Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: Q

MEST

MEST 203 - Formerly 10 - Middle East Literatures in Translation (4)
An examination, through English translation, of one or more literary traditions of the Middle East. The focus of the course varies from one semester to the next. In any given semester, the course may center on Arabic, Israeli, Persian, Turkish, or other literature of the region in translation, or on a comparison of two or more of these traditions. Literary genres and themes covered in this course may also vary. For example, the course may focus primarily on prose, such as novels and short stories, or center on particular themes, such as conflict or construction of identity.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
MEST 201 - Formerly 12 - Introduction to the Modern Middle East (4)
An introduction to the study of the modern Middle East, this course will survey the contemporary history, politics, economics, and intellectual currents that have shaped the region since World War II. The goal of the course is to build students' understanding of the shared features that have served to distinguish and unite Middle Eastern societies as well as raise their awareness of the diversity in ethnicity, religion, and political ideology that shape much of the contemporary knowledge about the region. Topics covered will include history, religion, political science, anthropology, sociology, art history, economics, and literature. Guest lectures throughout the semester. The course will end with an inquiry into the discipline itself, with students discussing the different theoretical models used to study the Middle East and their implications.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to Middle East Studies minors. Offered spring semester.
MEST 301 - Formerly 132 - Independent Study in Middle East Studies (2)
A tutorial stressing independent investigation of a topic selected in close consultation with the instructor. Students must meet with their faculty adviser at least once every two weeks and submit regular oral and written reports in a timely manner. Admission to the course is by petition to the director of the program in Middle East studies.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MEST 302 - Formerly 134 - Independent Study in Middle East Studies (4)
A tutorial stressing independent investigation of a topic selected in close consultation with the instructor. Students must meet with their faculty adviser at least once every two weeks and submit regular oral and written reports in a timely manner. Admission to the course is by petition to the director of the program in Middle East studies.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MEST 207 - Formerly 32 - Selected Topics in Middle East Studies (2)
A focus on aspects of Middle East studies not covered by regular course offerings. Topics vary from year to year depending upon student interest and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
MEST 208 - Formerly 34 - Selected Topics in Middle East Studies (4)
A focus on aspects of Middle East studies not covered by regular course offerings. Topics vary from year to year depending upon student interest and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: DIT

MHEB

MHEB 101 - Formerly 1 - Elementary Modern Hebrew I (4)
A study of the basic structures and vocabulary of modern, everyday Hebrew through exercises in reading, speaking, and writing.
Meets: Three hours class. Offered annually.
MHEB 102 - Formerly 20 - Elementary Modern Hebrew II (4)
A study of the basic structures and vocabulary of modern, everyday Hebrew through exercises in reading, speaking, and writing.
Meets: Three hours class Offered annually.
MHEB 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4)
An advanced study in Hebrew conversation, writing, and reading.
For students with at least one full year of Modern Hebrew. Meets: Three hours class. Offering to be determined.
MHEB 299 - Formerly 99 - Modern Hebrew across the Curriculum (2)
Foreign Languages across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
May be taken twice (for a maximum of 4 credits) with two different cognate courses. Signature of language instructor. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in a cognate course.

MUS

MUS 101 - Formerly 1 - Music: Imagination and Technique (4)
An introduction to the shaping forces of music, with emphasis on developing musical imagination. Includes basics of acoustics; rhythm and pitch notation; scales; keys; triadic structures; functional harmony; form; and compositional processes. A computer is required since it replaces a printed text so that sounds can be heard. Designed for students with little or no prior musical knowledge or more advanced students interested in learning about music from the perspective of the composer.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 301 - Formerly 101 - Music of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Eras (4)
An overview of Western art music from ancient Greece to the music of Bach and Handel. We will study a core repertoire of music in its historical contexts and explore debates of what these pieces may have sounded like when they were first performed. Students will also learn about the field of music history and the tools available for music research at Drew. At least one class trip to a performance of music before 1750 will be required.
Enrollment priority: Limited to those with junior or senior standing. Prerequisite: MUS+3. Offered fall semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, WM
MUS 303 - Formerly 103 - Music of the Classic and Romantic Eras (4)
An in-depth study of Western art music from the Enlightenment to Late Romanticism. We will study representative works in historical contexts ranging from the emergence of modern concert life in the mid-1700s to nineteenth-century Romanticism, nationalism, and exoticism. Students will apply the knowledge gained from coursework to the understanding of recent musicological scholarship. At least one class trip to a performance of music studied in class will be required."
Enrollment priority: Limited to those with junior or senior standing. Prerequisite: MUS+3. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, WM
MUS 311 - Formerly 111 - Music of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries (4)
An exploration of the revolutionary changes in music composition, performance, and reception since 1900. Topics include the challenges of modernism and modernity, political upheaval, technological innovation, globalization, and the rising importance of popular music and jazz. Emphasis on learning effective communication of opinions about challenging musical repertoire through written assignments and oral presentations. At least one class trip to a performance of music studied in class will be required.
Enrollment priority: Limited to those with junior or senior standing. Prerequisite: MUS+3. Offered fall semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, WM
MUS 315 - Formerly 115 - Style Analysis (4)
An in-depth style analysis technique developed by Jan LaRue of New York University. Musical style will be studied from five basic viewpoints: manipulation of timbre, harmony, melody, rhythm, and form. The first half of the course will concentrate on these elements as they are utilized in works chosen from various historical periods. The second half of the course integrates the five basic elements into a cohesive analysis of four pivotal works from music history. Attention will be given to how different composers have utilized the same five elements to produce radically different stylistic results.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
MUS 324 - Formerly 124 - Techniques of 20th and 21st Century Music (4)
A study of techniques developed in this century, applied to original composition work. Techniques derived from composers ranging from Bartok, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Britten to Ives, Cage, Oliveros, Glass, and Adams. Emphasizes developments since 1950, with investigation of factors leading to developing one's own style. Composing and presenting at least one moderate-length work and one large-scale work is also a goal.
May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: MUS+60 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester in alternate years.
MUS 331 - Formerly 125 - Advanced Vocal or Instrumental Instruction (2-8)
Private music instruction for students with advanced performance skills. Lessons are with affiliate artists appointed by the music department. Students must participate in at least one Works-in-Progress recital in the Concert Hall during each semester in which they are registered for the course. Separate sections for vocal, keyboard, guitar, strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion lessons. All fees for such study are borne directly by the student and are in addition to the regular tuition charges and fees of the University. Limited scholarship aid is available at the discretion of the department. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MUS 334 - Formerly 134 - Orchestration (4)
Musicians must be conversant with the instruments commonly used in compositions in western music. This course will study each instrument in the common-practice orchestra and include its history, construction, timbre (tonal quality) and individual writing techniques endemic to its tonal color. As the course progresses, these instruments will be combined into families (string, woodwind, brass and percussion) and then finally as a full orchestra. Students will work with music writing software and instrumental sampling software so they can hear the results of their orchestrations.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: MUS+103 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall semester in alternate years.
MUS 337 - Formerly 137 - Electronic Music Composition (4)
Focus is on original composition using electronic sound systems developed over the past half century. Procedures examined include both analog and digital synthesis techniques ranging from a classic Moog Synthesizer to FM and wave table synthesis, MIDI (Music Instruments Digital Interface), sequencing, sampling, and algorithmic control. Goals include creation and presentation of several short works together with a final substantial composition.
Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority: music majors and minors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: MUS+60 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
MUS 341 - Formerly 141 - Topics in Music History (4)
An in-depth study of a topic, viewpoint, or methodology in music history. Topic will vary according to faculty expertise and student interest.
May be repeated as topic changes. Enrollment priority: Limited to those with junior or senior standing. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: MUS+3. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, WM
MUS 215 - Formerly 15 - Chorale (2)
Instruction in vocal techniques, phonetics, diction, and sight reading in connection with the study and performance of representative choral music from the 12th century to the present. Where possible, students with skills in playing instruments are given the opportunity to participate as soloists, as accompanists, or as members of a chamber ensemble. Open to all students, faculty, and staff by audition.
At most eight credits for instrumental and/or vocal study may be counted toward the degree. Students seeking credit for Chorale must register in regular fashion each semester in which they seek credit. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 350 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Music (2-4)
Approved and directed projects on particular problems in music. Results to be reported in an appropriate paper.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MUS 353 - Formerly 153 - Writing for the Musical Theatre (4)
An exploration of the history, style, and techniques of writing for the musical theatre through the collaboration of composer, playwright, and lyricist. Course work will include development of original material.
Enrollment priority: Given to Theatre Arts and Music majors. Prerequisite: THEA+55 or MUS+60, or permission of instructor. Same as: THEA+153
MUS 217 - Formerly 17 - Madrigal Singers (1-4)
Instruction in vocal techniques, phonetics, diction, and sight reading. Focuses on repertoire for a capella (unaccompanied) vocal chamber ensemble. The Madrigal singers rehearse once per week and perform several times yearly on campus.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. May be repeated for credit. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 400 - Formerly 198 - Music Capstone (2)
The capstone for the music major is a two-semester sequence in which students bring together the creative, performance, historical and theoretical components of the major and place them in the wider context of the liberal arts. In the Fall semester, students meet as a group or individually with the Capstone instructor once per week. They attend designated concerts in the Concert Hall and participate in at least one field trip, selected with student input. Coursework consists of an online portfolio of their best work in the four components of the major, reflective written assignments, and class discussions about shared concert attendance. Students also develop and submit a formal proposal for their Capstone Project, which will be presented as part of the joint Music Capstone Festival in the spring. In the Spring semester, students prepare their Capstone Project, which will be individually designed but will meet specified goals in performance (creative, musical, verbal), writing/resear
Course may be repeated.
MUS 400 - Formerly 199 - Senior Project: Seminar (4)
A study of problems in research, history, theory, composition, or performance practices. Senior music majors meet once weekly over two semesters. Students emphasizing history do an in-depth research project on an assigned topic. Students emphasizing theory/composition write a substantial work and/or analyze a work of a specific genre. Students emphasizing performance practices prepare a paper relating to the period, composers, instruments, works being studied in preparation for a senior recital.
[CAP] Capstone Offered every semester.
MUS 102 - Formerly 2 - Music Fundamentals (4)
An entry level course in music theory. The course will teach music notation, scales, key signatures and basic harmony. All students will learn basic sight singing skills and perform simple melodic and rhythmic exercises periodically during the semester.
MUS 220 - Formerly 20 - Pan-African Choral Performance (2)
Study and performance of representative choral music from the Pan-African music traditions of Africa, the Caribbean and the United States. Students will study and perform several genres that may include traditional and contemporary spirituals, hymns and gospel; work songs; blues; jazz; rhythm and blues; freedom and liberation songs; and classical arrangements. Students with skills in playing instruments are given the opportunity to participate as soloists and as accompanists.
The instructor may require auditions for soloists and touring ensembles. May be repeated for up to four credits for PAST - Formerly PANAF or music major.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 222 - Formerly 22 - University Chamber Orchestra (1-4)
Study and performance of representative instrumental music from the Middle Ages to the present. Also performs in conjunction with musical theatre productions. Open on a noncredit basis to all students, faculty, and staff by audition.
Students seeking credit for Chamber Orchestra participation must register in regular fashion each semester in which they seek credit. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. May be repeated up to eight credits for the nonmusic major, four credits for the music major. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 223 - Formerly 23 - Introduction to Conducting (4)
Designed to provide a basic technical foundation of conducting skills and insights. All students can benefit from the musical insights that conducting study can provide. During the course, students gain a critical kinetic sense of the flow of music in time by creating movements that elicit musical imagery in space and time. The analytical and score reading components of the course are designed to deepen the listening experience of any musician.
Prerequisite: MUS+1 and permission of instructor Offered fall semester in alternate years.
MUS 229 - Formerly 24 - Selected Ensembles (1-4)
Open to instrumentalists and vocalists in the following groups: University Wind Ensemble, section . 001; University Flute Orchestra, section . 002; Chamber Ensembles, section . 003; and University Brass Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, or Pep Band, section . 004. Ensembles present at least one performance per semester. Open to students, faculty, and staff on a credit or noncredit basis.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
MUS 227 - Formerly 27 - Music Theory I (4)
An integrated treatment of basic elements of the theory, analysis and aural skills of common Practice Era (tonal) music. Includes rhythm; clefs; major, minor and modal scales; keys; intervals; triads and seventh-chords; inversions; and elementary species counterpoint. Emphasis is on integrating an intellectual grasp of elementary music theory with practical, aural skills. (sight singing and ear training).
Prerequisite: MUS+2. Offered fall semester.
MUS 228 - Formerly 28 - Music Theory II (4)
The theory and structure of music from the early 19th century through the mid-20th century. Includes chromatic harmony, altered chordal structures, extended tertian and quartal sonorities, and an exploration of 20th-century techniques (atonal, aleatoric, serial, minimalist, dodecaphonic, and others). Works analyzed range from mid-Beethoven through Crumb, Glass, and others. A detailed analytical project is required in addition to the final composition project.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: MUS+27, or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
MUS 103 - Formerly 3 - Introduction to Western Art Music (4)
This course is designed to introduce students to Western art music, the fundamentals of its construction, and its cultural contexts from the seventeenth century to the present. Attendance at a live concert performance of Western art music is required. Short papers and presentations will explore connections between music and other disciplines and the experience of Western art music live in concert.
This course is intended for non-majors and prospective music majors/minors. and is the prerequisite for upper-level courses in Western music history and culture. Enrollment priority: Given to music majors and minors. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BA, BH
MUS 30 - Techniques of the Voice (4)
A study of the basic elements of fine vocal production. Studies anatomy, physiology, and physics of the human voice. Emphasizes good vowel and consonant production. Explores the various registers of the voice. Uses a phonetic approach to teach the basics of Italian, German, English, and French singing diction.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
MUS 231 - Formerly 31 - World of Opera and the Musical Theatre (4)
A broad survey of the world of opera and the musical theatre from the standpoint of the stories, historical context, singers, libretti, stage designs, costumes, and music that are considered masterpieces. Emphasizes exploration and analysis of representative works on videotape. Students create/present/perform a scene from a specified work and prepare a historical/analytical project. The class visits Lincoln Center and has the opportunity of attending a dress rehearsal at the Metropolitan Opera.
Prerequisite: An introductory music course or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
MUS 233 - Formerly 33 - Music of the Whole Earth (4)
A broad survey of world music, including tribal, folk, and art music, specifically music of Africa, Asia, and Indonesia, among others. Emphasizes analysis of the music and its historical and cultural contexts. Requires attendance at and written critique of a live performance of non-Western music or an additional research project designed in conference with the instructor.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BA, DIT
MUS 234 - Formerly 34 - History of Jazz (4)
A course designed to help students become familiar with and appreciate jazz as an important American art form through listening together with discussion of key artists, styles, terminology, culture and traditions. Attendance at a live performance is required.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: DUS, BA
MUS 235 - Formerly 35 - Music of the World's Religions (4)
The interrelationship between ritual and music in several world religions. Religious traditions to be included are Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Santeria. No technical knowledge of music is necessary.
Offered spring semester in alternate years. Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+669
MUS 236 - Formerly 36 - Women in Music (4)
A study of women composers/performers through the ages emphasizing their changing roles and society's changing attitudes. The seminar focuses on selected works of Hildegard von Bingen, Clara Schumann, Fanny Hensel, Maria Grandval, Ellen Taafe Zwilich, and Laurie Anderson, among others.
Fall Semester
Fulfills: DIT, BA, BH
MUS 238 - Formerly 38 - African American Music History (4)
A survey course covering the history of major developments in the tradition of African American Music. Starting with a discussion of African Music, this course will trace the major music genres that define African American Music from the 18th century to the present. More than listing titles of pieces and musicians, the course will emphasize the historic and cultural factors that helped define developments of African American music. Students will read various articles covering specific discussions of the historical development and cultural analysis of this musical tradition.

Fulfills: BH, BA, DUS
MUS 240 - Formerly 40 - Music in the American Century (4)
A broad survey of American music from John Adams to Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. We will examine neo-romantic trends in the music of Samuel Barber, Amy Beach and John Corigliano, the transcendentalism of Charles Ives, the American West in Aaron Copland, jazz in the music of Leonard Bernstein and the innovations of minimalist composers Phillip Glass and Steve Reich, and the new directions of the "avant-garde" from John Cage to Pauline Oliveros.
Offered in odd-numbered years.
MUS 246 - Formerly 46 - Counterpoint (4)
An exploration of contrapuntal compositional techniques, including canon, two-and three-part inventions, and the fugue. Original composition exercises will be assigned to demonstrate application of the various techniques.
Prerequisite: MUS+1 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
MUS 252 - Formerly 52 - Keyboard Studies (2)
Class instruction in areas of basic musicianship & piano skills designed primarily for those with limited or no knowledge in piano technique. Included will be basic music theory with emphasis on scales, chords, and beginning to intermediate music. Additional applications will include sight-reading, transposition, harmonization, basic improvisation, ensemble performance, and use of various accompaniment patterns.
MUS 55 - Selected Studies in Music (4)
An intensive survey of Russian music from the 19th century of Glazounov and Glinka, emphasizing the Balekirev group of Borodin, Moussorgsky, and Rimsky-Korsokov. Analyzes the music of Tchaikovsky, Scriabin, and the challenges faced by Shostakovich and others under the Soviet system, including an examination of Stravinsky's music and an exploration of contemporary composers Sofia Gubaidlina and Alfred Schnittke. Students present short projects enhancing their understanding of the relationship of music and social/political policy under the Soviets. Other projects include presentations and analyses of particular works. A term paper based on an in-depth study of an aspect of Russian music is required.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: An introductory course in music or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
MUS 260 - Formerly 60 - Music Composition (4)
Applied music composition practices in the context of traditional styles of Western music up to and including the first half of the 20th century. Includes development of skills in notation, instrumentation, harmonic structures, and counterpoint. Composing and presenting at least one moderate length work and one multi-movement work is also a goal.
May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: MUS+1 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester in alternative years.
MUS 270 - Formerly 70 - Introduction to Performing Arts Administration (4)
An introduction to the basic cultural role, issues, structures, operations, and personnel of performing arts (music and theatre) organizations, focusing primarily on the non-profit sector. Contextual subjects will include: an arts institution's role in and responsibility to its community; government's role in the arts; issues of control and power within the organization. Specific topics will include: types of organizations and organizational structures; marketing, publicity and public relations; fundraising, donor relations, grant writing; long-range planning.
Prerequisite: At least 8 credits in music or theatre. Same as: THEA+70
MUS 116 - Formerly 9 - Instrumental Vocal Instruction (1)
Private music instruction for students with beginning to intermediate performance skills. Lessons are with affiliate artists appointed by the department. Students are expected to perform at least once by the end of the semester in which they are registered for the course in either the department's monthly Works-in-Progress recitals in the Concert Hall or in an informal studio recital (choice of performing venue will be at the instructor's discretion). Separate sections for vocal, keyboard, guitar, strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion lessons. All fees for such studies are borne directly by the student and are in addition to the regular tuition charges and fees of the University. Limited scholarship aid is available at the discretion of the department. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. May be repeated for at most eight credits toward the degree. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
MUS AA1 - University Chorus (1)
This course will promote the learning of musical skills through choral performance. Open to singers of any musical level, this course will teach students a variety of choral repertoire from different musical styles and genres. There are no auditions necessary for this group. The final evaluation of the course material will occur in the final concert offered every semester. Graded on a Pass/Unsatisfactory basis. This course may be repeated. At most four credits for instrumental and/or vocal study may be counted toward the degree. Offered every semester. The University Chorus is open to all students, faculty, and staff.
Course may be repeated.
MUS AA2 - University Chorus- No Credit
This course will promote the learning of musical skills through choral performance. Open to singers of any musical level, this course will teach students a variety of choral repertoire from different musical styles and genres. There are no auditions necessary for this group. The final evaluation of the course material will occur in the final concert offered every semester. Graded on a Pass/Unsatisfactory basis. This course may be repeated. At most four credits for instrumental and/or vocal study may be counted toward the degree. Offered every semester. The University Chorus is open to all students, faculty, and staff.
Course may be repeated.

NEUR - Formerly NEURO

NEUR 101 - Formerly NEURO 1 - Introduction to Neuroscience (4)
This introductory course explores how the physical properties of the brain give rise to mental processes. Students will investigate current major challenges in neuroscience research such as searching for a cure to Alzheimer's disease, examining the biological basis of memory and investigating the nature of consciousness. While focusing in these challenges, students will learn important fundamental knowledge of neuroscience in the area of genetics, neurotransmission, neural development, brain anatomy, cognition and computational neural modeling.

Fulfills: BNS, BI
NEUR 210 - Formerly NEURO 10 - Neuroscience Research Methods (4)
This course examines research methods commonly employed in the neurosciences, with an emphasis on experimental procedures. The course encourages development of skills in collecting and analyzing quantitative data and in scientific writing.
Prerequisite: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+1 and MATH+3. Offered annually.
Fulfills: WM
NEUR 366 - Formerly NEURO 111 - Computational Modeling of Neural Systems (4)
Computational neuroscience is the study of the brain as a computational and information-processing organ. It is a highly interdisciplinary field that employs various ideas and techniques from physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, psychology, and (of course) neuroscience. In this course, we cover the following topics: biophysics of a single neuron; dynamics of neural networks; models of associative memory and object recognition; and numerical methods and tools for analyzing and simulating a dynamical system. We study the fundamental biophysical properties and processes of the neurons and their networks, while also learning to use several analytical and numerical methods for studying a complex dynamical system. The goal of the course is to develop an interdisciplinary approach for analyzing a biological system.
Prerequisite: PHYS+11 Corequisite: PHYS+2 or PHYS+12 Same as: PHYS+111
Fulfills: BI
NEUR 354 - Formerly NEURO 118 - Cognitive Neuroscience (4)
This course examines the mechanisms by which the nervous system supports higher mental functions, with a focus on how neural structures represent and transform information. The course draws on a variety of disciplines including cognitive psychology, neurobiology, computer science, linguistics, and philosophy. Discussion topics include perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, emotion, development, social cognition, consciousness, and neuroethics. Laboratory and off- campus activities will expose students to a variety of empirical research techniques, such as functional neuroimaging, single-neuron electrophysiology, and electroencephalography, commonly employed in cognitive neuroscience research.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+10 or PSYC+14 and PSYC+19 or permission of instructor Offered annually Same as: PSYC+118
NEUR 356 - Formerly NEURO 120 - Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology (4)
The structure and function of neurons, the basic building blocks of the nervous system, are investigated. The course builds to an understanding of how neuronal cell function determines higher brain processes, such as sensation and memory. The laboratory employs living neurons' growth in culture to explore topics such as growth of neurites, cell signaling pathways, and neural degeneration.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+22 Same as: BIOL+120
NEUR 346 - Formerly NEURO 121 - Systems Neurobiology (4)
The neurons of the nervous system are organized into systems that can be defined on the basis of function, anatomy or neurochemistry. This course explores the development of these systems, coordination of the activity within each system, and clinical disorders arising from malfunctions. The laboratory uses current neuroanatomical, pharmacological and neurochemical techniques to explore structure and function.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+22 and NEUR - Formerly NEURO+10 or permission of the instructor Offered Annually. Same as: BIOL+121
NEUR 364 - Formerly NEURO 144 - Seminar in Biopsychology (2-4)
A review and discussion of current problems in the biological determinants of behavior. The particular issues explored are announced prior to registration
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+19 Offered annually. Same as: PSYC+144
NEUR 368 - Formerly NEURO 168 - Theories About Vision (4)
This upper-level course introduces modern ideas about vision, based on empirical findings and guided by mathematical and computational considerations. We will consider how inherent ambiguities of the visual stimuli may be resolved through statistical inferences and estinamtions, and how such computations are impllemented by the population of neurons. We will study elementary information theory as a means of quantifying the information-processing capacity of the visual cortex. This course will emphasize theoretical approaches to neuroscience, and complement the existing neuroscience curriculum, where the existing strength includes the study of the neural systems at the molecular, cellular, systems, and behavioral levels with the experimental techniques.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: (NEUR - Formerly NEURO+1 or PSYC+19) and MATH+3 Offered spring semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI
NEUR 370 - Formerly NEURO 192 - Special Topics in Neuroscience (2-4)
Topics relevant to neuroscience may be offered as opportunities arise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
NEUR 400 - Formerly NEURO 194 - Capstone Seminar in Neuroscience (2)
An in-depth exploration of a specific topic in neuroscience, with an emphasis on current theories and research in the area (topic will vary with instructor). Each topic will be explored from a variety of different perspectives as students investigate the different ways of conceptualizing and approaching a common area of neuroscience research. Students will present and discuss the current literature in the field and develop their own proposals for addressing an unresolved question in this particular area of neuroscience.
[CAP] Capstone Corequisite or Prerequisite: , 356, 346 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
NEUR 394 - Formerly NEURO 195 - Independent Study in Neuroscience: Literature Research (2)
Independent investigation of a topic in neuroscience chosen in consultation with the instructor and approved by the neurosciences director. Regular meetings by arrangement with the instructor. Final literature research paper or research proposal required.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
NEUR 396 - Formerly NEURO 197 - Advanced Independent Research in Neuroscience: Laboratory/ Field Research (2-4)
Independent study of a specific question in neuroscience through laboratory or field research. Topics are chosen in consultation with an individual neuroscience faculty member, who will supervise the research. Final research report required. Students must have completed at least one upper-level core neuroscience course and have a research proposal approved prior to beginning the research project. Weekly one-hour seminar in addition to regular meetings with research supervisor.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+109 and BIOL+120 Offered every semester.
NEUR 411 - Formerly NEURO 199 - Honors Research in Neuroscience (4)
Faculty-mentored independent research culminating in a written thesis and an oral defense. Required to receive Specialized Honors in Neuroscience.
[CAP] Capstone Prerequisite: 2-4 credits of NEUR - Formerly NEURO+197: Independent Research in Neurosciencnce. Offered spring semester.
NEUR 294 - Formerly NEURO AA1 - Intermediate Independent Research: Literature Research (2)
Independent study of a specific topic in neuroscience through literature research and written literature review. Topics are chosen in consultation with an individual neuroscience faculty member, who will supervise the research. Final literature research paper or research proposal required. Suitable for students who have completed little or no advanced coursework in the area of neuroscience. Weekly one-hour seminar in addition to regular meetings with research supervisor.
NEUR 296 - Formerly NEURO AA2 - Intermediate Independent Research: Lab/Field Research (2)
Independent study of a specific question in neuroscience through laboratory or field research. Projects are chosen in consultation with an individual neuroscience faculty member, who will supervise the research. Final research report required. Suitable for students who have completed little or no advanced coursework in the area of neuroscience. Weekly one-hour seminar in addition to regular meetings with research supervisor.

PAST - Formerly PANAF

PAST 101 - Formerly PANAF 10 - Introduction to Pan-African Studies (4)
A broad, cross-disciplinary introduction to the study of Africa and the African diaspora. Explores the various historic and contemporary approaches, arguments, and theories on the study of Africans and people of the African diaspora within several disciplines, including anthropology, economics, literature, history, music, religion, sociology, art, and political science. Seeks to encourage students to think critically about a variety of issues related to the lives of Africans and people of the African diaspora.
Enrollment priority: given to Pan-African studies majors and minors. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
PAST 155 - Formerly PANAF 11 - Peoples of Africa: Cultures and Civilizations (4)
An introduction to the contemporary and historic cultures, art, music, and literature of the peoples of Africa. Explores the evolution of great empires and themes such as community, cohesion, collision, and the impact of outside forces. Examines social and political systems, as well as individual life experiences of specific African peoples.
Same as ANTH+55. Offered in alternate years.
PAST 208 - Formerly PANAF 119 - Religions of Africa (4)
An introduction to the basic themes within the traditional religions of Africa, including the nature of God, the significance of creation myths, the role of ancestors, the importance of religious leaders, and the problem of evil, sickness, and death. Explores the problematic Christian encounter with African religions, the Semitic connection and African Islam, and the role and function of the Independent African-Christian Churches.
Same as: ANTH+119 and REL+143. Offered Annually.
Fulfills: BI, DIT, WI
PAST 305 - Formerly PANAF 170 - Selected Topics Pan African Studies (4)
An examination of one or more selected topics in Pan-African studies not covered in the regular course offerings. Topics vary in accordance with student interests and faculty expertise.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered every semester.
PAST 400 - Formerly PANAF 180 - Pan African Studies Seminar (4)
Using the classroom as a forum for the discussion of methods, theories, arguments, and data on Pan African topics, students produce a major research paper. The course seeks to facilitate learning among students through research and discussion. Faculty representing the several disciplines within the Pan African studies program and guest lecturers participate in class discussions.
Prerequisite: PAST - Formerly PANAF+10 and four additional courses satisfying the Pan African Studies Major or minor. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: WM
PAST 300 - Formerly PANAF 190 - Independent Study in Pan African Studies (1-4)
A special program of study planned by the student, as approved by a faculty sponsor.
Course may be repeated. Written proposal. Offered every semester.
PAST 220 - Formerly PANAF 20 - Pan-African Choral Performance (2)
Study and performance of representative choral music from the Pan-African music traditions of Africa, the Caribbean and the United States. Students will study and perform several genres that may include traditional and contemporary spirituals, hymns and gospel; work songs; blues; jazz; rhythm and blues; freedom and liberation songs; and classical arrangements. Students with skills in playing instruments are given the opportunity to participate as soloists and as accompanists.
The course is open for credit or non-credit to all students, faculty and staff without audition. Students seeking credit for this course must register each semester in which they seek credit. May be repeated for up to four credits for PAST - Formerly PANAF or music major. The instructor may require auditions for soloists and touring ensembles.
Fulfills: BA
PAST 201 - Formerly PANAF 80 - Experiential Learning Seminar in Pan African Studies (2-4)
A study of issues, problems, and ideas in Africa or the African diaspora. An experimental learning approach will expose students to people and activities outside of the classroom and off campus; these experiences might include, but would not be limited to, presentations by outside speakers and field trips.
This seminar was endowed by a gift from William Freeman C'74 and his wife Ellen. Course may be repeated. Enrollment priority: Given to Pan African Studies Majors and Minors. Recommended: PAST 101 - Formerly PANAF 10 - Offered spring semester.

PE

PE 101 - Formerly 1 - Introduction to Sports Management (2)
An introduction to Sports Management/Studies. Topics include organizational structure, supervision and leadership, business strategies, sports ethics, corporate sponsorship, and legal considerations.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered spring semester.
PE 208 - Formerly 11 - Intermediate Tennis (1)
A review of the basic strokes and an introduction to the lob, overhead, and approach shots. Singles' and doubles' strategy and play are included.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: PE+8 or equivalent Offered spring semester.
PE 220 - Formerly 14 - Triathlon training (1)
Designed for swimmers of intermediate level to develop advanced skills in aquatics and competitive swim training.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Intermediate-level swimming ability Offering to be determined.
PE 203 - Formerly 15 - Intermediate Ballroom Dance (1)
Students will be taught the intermediate aspects of traditional ballroom dance by building upon the fundamental steps associated with various ballroom dances.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
PE 103 - Formerly 3 - Beginning Ballroom Dancing (1)
Students will be taught the beginning aspects of traditional ballroom dance by learning the fundamental steps associated with various ballroom dances.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
PE 231 - Formerly 31 - SCUBA Diving (1)
Study and practice opportunities are provided in the use of the equipment used in snorkeling (skin diving) and Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA). Successful completion may lead to world YMCA certification.
Physician's medical examination required. Extra fee. Not a lifeguard training course. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Swimmer-level swimming ability Offered every semester.
PE 232 - Formerly 32 - Karate Self-Defense (1)
Instruction in the basic technique and philosophy of Asian martial arts, specifically karate. This course covers practical and situational self defense skills. Also meditation, conflict resolution, breath control, and stretching techniques. Extra fee.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered fall semester.
PE 234 - Formerly 34 - Martial Arts Self-Defense (1)
Instruction in the basic practice and theory of traditional Asian martial arts movement patterns as a self defense reference, fitness routine, and moving meditation. Also, conflict resolution, breath control, and stretching techniques. Extra fee.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered spring semester.
PE 238 - Formerly 38 - Volleyball (1)
Skills, rules, and strategy involved in volleyball are discussed, analyzed, drilled, and then practiced in game situations.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offering to be determined.
PE 239 - Formerly 39 - Squash and Racquetball (1)
Presentation and practice of skills and strategy for squash and racquetball, singles and doubles. Includes rules of the game and informal tournaments.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered every semester.
PE 104 - Formerly 4 - Beginning Golf (1)
Introductory instruction in basic skills, selection and care of equipment, rules, and etiquette. Two field trips are included. Extra fee.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered every semester.
PE 248 - Formerly 48 - Sports injury Prevention CPR/First Aid (2)
Focuses on the immediate, temporary care given to the victim of an accident or sudden illness. Successful completion may lead to First Aid and CPR Adult, Infant, and Child and/or Community First Aid Certification by the American Red Cross.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered every semester.
PE 105 - Formerly 5 - Beginning Swimming (1)
Non-swimmers learn to swim following Red Cross guidelines for beginner and advanced beginner levels.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offering to be determined.
PE 250 - Formerly 50 - Core Training (1)
Sculpt your body as you improve your body's overall functional strength, balance and coordination. This class focuses on strength, movement and balance challenges through use of the body's core muscles. The course is ideal for those with active lifestyles.
PE 252 - Formerly 52 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (2)
Reviews basic anatomy and physiology involved in injuries. Students learn mechanisms of injury and basic care and prevention. Upon completion students are able to recognize common injuries incurred in athletics and recreational activities. Simple taping and wrapping procedures are demonstrated and learned.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered spring semester.
PE 107 - Formerly 7 - Body Blast (1)
Develops physical fitness with emphasis on endurance training to music.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offering to be determined.
PE 108 - Formerly 8 - Beginning Tennis (1)
Instruction for the novice in the basic strokes: forehand, backhand, serve, and volley. History, court etiquette, and rules of the game are included.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered fall semester.
PE 109 - Formerly 9 - Circuit Training (1)
Weight training and conditioning: Cybex, free weights, stationary cycling, and jogging for the development of joint flexibility, muscular strength, endurance, and cardiovascular efficiency.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Offered every semester.

PH

PH 101 - Formerly 10 - Public Health (gateway course) (4)
A survey of public health principles including epidemiological, environmental, cultural, behavioral, and policy issues that are relevant to the provision of health care. Selected topics on emerging diseases, intervention strategies, as well as the structure and functions of public health institutions will be covered. Topics are covered through readings, films, guest speakers, literature research and site visits.
Enrollment priority: Given to declared Public Health Minors. Meets: Meets: three hours class. Offered fall Semester.
Fulfills: BI
PH 320 - Formerly 102 - Environmental Health (4)
A comprehensive study of the environmental and occupational factors that contribute to the development of health problems. Topics dealing with disease prevention and control, health education and promotion, safety rules and regulations at all levels, and policy issues will be examined. This course will include field trips to local and state institutions.
Meets: Meets: three hours class. Prerequisite: PH+10 or permission of instructor. Offered fall Semester.
PH 340 - Formerly 120 - Epidemiology (4)
An in-depth study of disease profiles, patterns and frequencies. Concepts of cause and effect; disease transmission, prevention and control; efficacy and effectiveness of intervention strategies; frameworks for development of evidence-based recommendations; as well as applications of epidemiological methods to screening, outbreak investigations, and policy will be examined.
Meets: Meets: three hours class. Prerequisite: PH+10 and MATH+3, or permission of Instructor. Offered fall Semester.
PH 401 - Formerly 190 - Health Seminar (capstone) (2)
In-depth investigation of selected topics in public health. This course will include discussion and analysis of scientific literature, student presentations, and independent research projects,
Enrollment priority: Open only to public health minors with senior standing. Meets: Meets: two hours of class. Signature of instructor required. Offered spring Semester.

PHIL

PHIL 101 - Formerly 1 - Introduction to Philosophy (4)
A probing of fundamental philosophical questions, such as: Are there rational grounds for the existence of God? Can the notion of God be reconciled with the presence of evil? How do we know what we know? What is a cause? Could there be disembodied thoughts? Is human behavior free or is it determined? Are there objective grounds for values? What makes a society just? What counts as a good explanation? The specific questions for extended study are selected by the instructor.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BH
PHIL 304 - Formerly 104 - Problems of Ethics and Meta-Ethics (4)
Critical discussions of issues in contemporary moral philosophy in the areas of applied ethics, normative ethics, and meta-ethics. At the most highly theoretical level are considerations about the meaning of moral terms that give rise to cognitive and noncognitive theories of ethics. At a more immediate level are problems of practical concern having to do with such issues as euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, and world hunger. Readings are from 20th-century philosophers, most of whom are alive today.
Offered spring semester.
PHIL 313 - Formerly 113 - Analytic Philosophy (4)
A seminar on influential work of 20th-century philosophers who developed and practiced methods of analysis. Discussions center on problems in the philosophy of language and on problems of epistemology concerning the grounds for our knowledge of the external world, of the past, and of ourselves and others. Readings are drawn from the works of Russell, Moore, Ayer, Ryle, Strawson, and Quine.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
PHIL 314 - Formerly 114 - Existentialism (4)
A study of the classics of, and major influences upon, existentialist thought. Authors emphasized are Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Camus, and Sartre. Some attention is given to Husserl's phenomenology and its influence outside philosophy proper.
Offered alternate years.
PHIL 317 - Formerly 117 - History of 19th-Century Philosophy (4)
A study of post-Kantian Continental philosophical systems from Hegel through Nietzsche. Other major figures studied are Fichte, Schopenhauer, Feuerbach, and Marx.
Offered alternate years.
PHIL 318 - Formerly 118 - Theory of Knowledge (4)
A critical examination of the following topics: the problems of perception, of memory, and of necessary truth; the justification of empirical knowledge; and the issue between rationalism and empiricism. The readings are taken from primary sources, both classical and contemporary.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: WI, BH
PHIL 319 - Formerly 119 - Problems of Metaphysics (4)
A critical examination of the following topics: the problem of time, of mind and body, of the self, of determinism and fatalism, and of the issue between idealism, materialism, and psychophysical dualism. The readings are taken from classical and contemporary primary sources.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, WI
PHIL 320 - Formerly 120 - Philosophy of Science (4)
An emphasis on the theory of scientific explanation. Other topics include the logic of confirmation and of disconfirmation, the nature of scientific laws, and the marks of pseudo-science.
Offered alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, BH
PHIL 322 - Formerly 122 - Philosophy of Mind (4)
A study of the distinctive nature of self and mind. Topics covered are behaviorism, identity materialism, dualism, the problems of personal identity and of individuation.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: WI, BH
PHIL 328 - Formerly 128 - Philosophy of Religion (4)
An exploration of whether or not belief in the existence of God is rational. Arguments are considered based on the origin of the universe, the problem of evil, the nature and variety of religious experience, the phenomenon of morality, and the ethics of belief.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
PHIL 213 - Formerly 13 - Introduction to Logic (4)
A study of the principles and methods of correct reasoning. Emphasizes the analysis of arguments, informal fallacies, and elementary deductive logic.
Offered annually. Same as: MATH+13
Fulfills: BH, BI, Q
PHIL 330 - Formerly 130 - Philosophy of Law (4)
A critical appraisal of various theories of law: the theory of natural law, legal positivism, legal realism, and the recent critical legal studies movement. An investigation of the limits of the authority of society over the individual, including the issues of paternalism and privacy. A study of different theories of punishment and the scope of responsibility for criminal behavior. Offered in alternate years.
Same as: PSCI+130
PHIL 334 - Formerly 134 - Aesthetics (4)
A study of a variety of questions centered upon philosophical aspects of art. Of primary concern are the notions of beauty, formalism, emotivism, criticism, expression, creation, and evaluation. Throughout, careful attention is paid to specific works of art as they serve to illuminate philosophical concerns.
Offered alternate years. Same as: ARTH - Formerly ARTHST+42
Fulfills: WI, DUS, BI, BH
PHIL 335 - Formerly 135 - Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy (4)
A seminar on issues at the center of philosophical controversy today, such as the controversy over free will and determinism, the possibility of artificial intelligence, and the Gettier problem. Discussions range over epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of language. Readings are selected from works written in the second half of the 20th century by philosophers such as Ayer, Foot, Strawson, Frankfurt, Putnam, Boden, Searle, Gettier, Chisholm, and Nagel.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: WI, BH
PHIL 344 - Formerly 144 - Environmental Aesthetics (4)
An exploration of questions centered at the intersection of aesthetics and environmental philosophy. Of primary concern are the relation between the aesthetic appreciation of nature and the aesthetic appreciation of art; the roles played by scientific knowledge, emotional engagement and imagination in the aesthetic appreciation of nature; the thesis that all of wild nature has positive value; and the theoretical role aesthetic considerations play in the rationale behind environmental conservation.
Offered in alternate years. Same as: ESS+144
Fulfills: BI, BH, WI
PHIL 345 - Formerly 145 - Selected Topics in Philosophy (2-4)
Topics in philosophy, varying from term to term as the department may direct.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered annually.
Fulfills: BH, WI
PHIL 351 - Formerly 151 - Symbolic Logic (4)
An introduction to the propositional and predicate calculus, notions of proof, model, consistency, and truth; the Deduction, Compactness, and First Incompleteness Theorems and philosophical ramifications. Meets: 150 minutes weekly.
PHIL 352 - Formerly 152 - Philosophy of Language (4)
A seminar on problems of meaning, truth, and reference. Discussions focus on some of the following topics: the nature of names and descriptions, identity statements and their analysis, necessary truths, the semantic theory of truth, the thesis of the interdeterminacy of translation, and the problem of propositional attitudes. Readings include selections from Frege, Russell, Strawson, Quine, Tarski, Austin, Searle, Wittgenstein, and Kripke.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: WI, BH
PHIL 353 - Formerly 153 - Seminar in the History of Philosophy (4)
A seminar centered on the study of a major historical figure, such as Plato, Aristotle, or Kant, or an influential movement, such as pragmatism, logical positivism, or process philosophy. Topic determined each year.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered annually.
PHIL 356 - Formerly 156 - Independent Study in Philosophy (4)
A tutorial investigating a topic not covered in the regular curriculum. Weekly meetings. Several short papers and a longer term paper. Open to junior and senior philosophy majors at the discretion of the department and the proposed instructor. Required for registration: Departmental approval of the student's written proposal.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
PHIL 400 - Formerly 198 - Senior Project in Philosophy (2)
The senior project involves guided research that concludes with a substantial paper in Philosophy on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The project typically takes the form of an additional paper for a companion course taken concurrently: either PHIL+104 or 113. The senior project may also be paired with a specialized honors thesis (HON 410 - Formerly 109 - ). REVISED COURSES
PHIL 210 - Formerly 36 - History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (4)
A survey of the history of philosophy from pre-Socratic Greek thought to medieval scholasticism. Particular attention is given to works of Plato and Aristotle. The views of pre-Socratics, Stoics, Epicureans, Augustine, and Aquinas are also discussed.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, WM
PHIL 211 - Formerly 38 - History of Modern Philosophy (4)
A survey of European philosophical thought in the 17th and 18th centuries. Readings are largely in the areas of metaphysics and epistemology and include selections from the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, WM
PHIL 104 - Formerly 4 - Introduction to Ethics (4)
An examination, both critical and historical, of moral theories that have shaped Western thought. Of central concern are questions about the criteria of moral goodness, the strictures of moral obligation, and the nature of justice. Some attention is given to the subjects of moral relativism, hedonism, and egoism. The theories of moral reasoning considered include those of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Cynics, the Epicureans, Hobbes, Kant, Bentham, and J. S. Mill.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BH

PHYS

PHYS 111 - Formerly 1 - Introductory Physics I (4)
PHYS+1 offers topics in mechanics: motion, Newton's laws, energy, conservation laws, collisions, gravitation, fluid behavior, oscillations, and waves. Thermodynamics. This is a non-calculus based course. Corequisite:PHYS+113 Formerly 3L.
Note that PHYS 150 - Formerly 11 - 1 - Formerly 1 - does not satisfy the prerequisites for upper-level physics courses; students who are or might be interested in further physics courses should take PHYS 150 - Formerly 11 - 1 - Formerly 1 - 1 and 12 instead. Meets: Three hours lecture, one hour recitation, three hours laboratory Corequisite: PHYS+3L Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 201 - Formerly 10 - Robotics Engineering (4)
This course is designed for students interested in engineering. It is a hands-on, project-based course, where teams of 3-5 students will build and test robots to perform a pre-defined task (e.g., navigating through obstacles, picking-up and carrying specified objects to a destination, etc.). The robots will compete against each other at the end of the course. The lectures will cover the basics of how certain sensors and motors work, and basic programming techniques for processing the sensor inputs and for generating motor outputs.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Repeatable as topic varies. Prerequisite: (or ) and , or permission of instructor. Offered Monday-Friday, from 10am to 5pm, during January Term.
Fulfills: BI, Q
PHYS 250 - Formerly 103 - Modern Physics (4)
A descriptive and mathematical introduction to topics in contemporary physics. Topics include special relativity, early quantum theory, the Schroedinger equation and its applications, and additional selected topics from general relativity, atomic, nuclear, solid state, and elementary particle physics.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12 and MATH+8 Offered fall semester. Same as: MAT+848
Fulfills: WI
PHYS 330 - Formerly 105 - Electrodynamics (4)
A classical treatment of electrodynamics in vacuum and matter. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields. Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves in conductors and non-conducting media. An introduction to the mathematics of vector calculus.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, and MATH+17 Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
PHYS 301 - Formerly 107 - Mechanics (4)
A study of Newton's laws applied to the motion of particles and systems of particles. Forced and damped harmonic oscillators. Central-field motion, collisions, conservation laws, Lagrangian mechanics, and Hamilton's equations. Also rigid body dynamics and topics in computational physics.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, and MATH+17 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
PHYS 331 - Formerly 109 - Optics (4)
A study of the wave equation, properties of wave motion, and electromagnetic waves. The propagation of light, dispersion, and absorption. Geometrical optics, lenses, optical systems. Superposition, interference, and Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction. Topics in modern optics.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, and MATH+17 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PHYS 150 - Formerly 11 - University Physics I (4)
is required for physics majors and 3/2 engineering students; it is also the normal introductory physics course recommended for most science majors. Because many students take calculus and PHYS+150 - in the same semester, calculus is introduced gradually and discussed as needed. Offers topics in mechanics: motion, Newton's laws, energy, conservation laws, collisions, gravitation, oscillations, and waves. Corequisite: PHYS+113 Formerly 3L.
Meets: Four hours of lecture. Corequisite: PHYS+3L Corequisite or Prerequisite: Calculus I ( Formerly 7,or equivalent) Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 332 - Formerly 110 - Thermal Physics (4)
A study of the fundamental concepts of classical thermodynamics and the thermal behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. The kinetic theory of gases. Statistical thermodynamics, including Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac statistics. Applications to an ideal diatomic gas, electrons in metals and monatomic crystals. Connection between statistical thermodynamics and information theory.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, and MATH+17 Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
PHYS 366 - Formerly 111 - Computational Modeling of Neural Systems (4)
Computational neuroscience is the study of the brain as a computational and information-processing organ. It is a highly interdisciplinary field that employs various ideas and techniques from physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, psychology, and (of course) neuroscience. In this course, we cover the following topics: biophysics of a single neuron; dynamics of neural networks; models of associative memory and object recognition; and numerical methods and tools for analyzing and simulating a dynamical system. We study the fundamental biophysical properties and processes of the neurons and their networks, while also learning to use several analytical and numerical methods for studying a complex dynamical system. The goal of the course is to develop an interdisciplinary approach for analyzing a biological system.
Prerequisite: PHYS+11, MATH+7. Corequisite: PHYS+12, MATH+8. Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+111
Fulfills: BI
PHYS 160 - Formerly 12 - University Physics II (4)
PHYS+12 is the normal introductory physics courses recommended for all science majors; also recommended for other students interested in physics. Includes electricity, magnetism, and electrical circuits. Light and optics: lenses, mirrors, diffraction and interference of light.
Meets: Three hours lecture, one hour recitation, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: PHYS+11 or equivalent. MATH+8 or equivalent. Corequisite: PHYS+4L Corequisite or Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite; MATH+8, or equivalent. Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 360 - Formerly 120 - Quantum Mechanics (4)
A study of the formalism and applications of quantum theory. Wave mechanics, interpretation of the quantum wave function, one-dimensional bound states, scattering and tunneling. Quantum mechanics in three dimensions. Two-particle systems, bosons and fermions, exchange forces. Approximation methods. Applications to atomic and molecular configurations.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, and MATH+104 Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
PHYS 304 - Formerly 123 - Advanced Physics Laboratory I (4)
Experimental physics at an advanced undergraduate level. Includes working in an increasingly independent format on a series of selected projects from a variety of physics areas. Lectures and laboratory work give specific attention to experimental design, laboratory techniques, computer data acquisition and analysis, and error propagation and analysis. Also serves as preparation for possible subsequent experimental research such as might be undertaken in PHYS+135.
Meets: One hour lecture, six hours laboratory Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12, 14, 103 and MATH+17 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: WM
PHYS 305 - Formerly 124 - Advanced Physics Laboratory II (4)
Experimental physics at an advanced undergraduate level. Includes working in an increasingly independent format on a series of selected projects from a variety of physics areas. Lectures and laboratory work give specific attention to experimental design, laboratory techniques, computer data acquisition and analysis, and error propagation and analysis. Also serves as preparation for possible subsequent experimental research such as might be undertaken in PHYS+135.
Meets: One hour lecture, six hours laboratory Prerequisite: PHYS+123 Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
PHYS 321 - Formerly 125 - Mathematical Physics (4)
An introduction to methods used in solving problems in physics and other sciences. Calculus of variations and extremum principles. Orthogonal functions and Sturm-Liouville problems. Fourier series. Series solutions of differential equations. The partial differential equations of physics. Transform and Green's function methods of solution. Nonlinear equations and chaos theory.
Meets: Four hours lecture Prerequisite: PHYS+11 or permission of instructor; and MATH+104 Offered fall semester on even years. Same as: MATH+125
PHYS 329 - Formerly 129 - Special Topics in Physics (4)
Topics chosen on the basis of instructor and student interest from areas such as condensed matter, atomic physics, particle physics; astrophysics, nonlinear phenomena, laser physics, and relativity.
Course may be repeated. Meets: Four hours lecture Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
PHYS 300 - Formerly 135 - Independent Study/Research in Physics (2-4)
An opportunity for independent work by upper-class students. Individual projects in experimental, theoretical, or computational physics selected in advance of registration and after conferral with and approval by the instructor. Available projects are often related to faculty research interests or to the development of course-support materials, such as new laboratory experiments.
May be repeated for at most eight credits. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and the department Offered every semester.
PHYS 255 - Formerly 14 - Electronics (4)
A laboratory course introducing electronic and instrumental techniques important in modern scientific experimentation. Includes DC and AC circuits, test instruments, power supplies, transducers, operational amplifiers, basic digital devices, and circuit simulation with computers. Extensive use of integrated circuits with strong emphasis on applications. Intended to provide background for advanced laboratory work in the sciences.
Meets: Two hours lecture, six hours laboratory Prerequisite: PHYS+12 and MATH+8 Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
PHYS 400 - Formerly 190 - Physics Seminar (2)
A junior-senior seminar meeting weekly to discuss current and/or historical topics in physics. Oral presentations by students on selected readings from such areas as experimental or theoretical research, government science policy, pseudoscience, and physics education.
Meets: Two hours seminar Prerequisite: Physics major with junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
PHYS 112 - Formerly 2 - Introductory Physics II (4)
PHYS+2 includes electricity, magnetism, and electrical circuits. Light and optics: lenses, diffraction and interference of light. Introductory topics in modern physics. This is a non-calculus based course.
Note that PHYS 150 - Formerly 11 - 2 - Formerly 2 - does not satisfy the prerequisites for upper-level physics courses; students who are or might be interested in further physics courses should take PHYS 150 - Formerly 11 - and 12 instead. Meets: Three hours lecture, one hour recitation, three hours laboratory Prerequisite: PHYS+1 or equivalent Corequisite: PHYS+4L Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 113 - Formerly 3L - General Physics Laboratory I
The laboratory correlated with PHYS+111 and 150 - Formerly 1 - and 11. Topics in mechanics, heat, and waves. This laboratory work is considered as one component (25%) of the total grade earned in either PHYS+111 or 150 - Formerly 1 - or 11.
This laboratory work is considered as one component (25%) of the total grade earned in either PHYS+1 or 11. Meets: Three hours laboratory Corequisite: PHYS+111 or 150 - Formerly 1-or 11. Offered fall semester.
PHYS 114 - Formerly 4L - General Physics Laboratory II
The laboratory correlated with PHYS+2 and 12. Topics in electricity and magnetism, optics, and elements of atomic and nuclear physics.
This laboratory work is considered as one component (25%) of the total grade earned in either PHYS+2 or 12. Meets: Three hours laboratory. Corequisite: PHYS+2 or 12. Offered spring semester.
PHYS 101 - Formerly 5 - Introductory Astronomy I-The Solar System (4)
An introduction to the astronomy of the solar system. The first part of the course will focus on some foundational material. This introductory material includes the celestial sphere, apparent motion of objects in the sky, angular and distance measurements, the electromagnetic spectrum, spectroscopy, and telescopes. We will then go on to discuss the overall scale and structure of the solar system as well as the properties of the planets and major non-planetary components of the solar system, including asteroids, comets, meteoroids, and interplanetary dust. This course includes quantitative reasoning and problem solving, which requires a willingness to use simple algebra. In addition, there will be an observational component using Drew's telescopes.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 102 - Formerly 6 - Introductory Astronomy II-Stars, Galaxies, and the Cosmos (4)
An observational and theoretical investigation of the components of the universe, including the structure and evolution of stars and galaxies; how black holes and quasars fit into current cosmological models; determination of the size and fate of the universe, and the probability of life as we know it outside of our Earth. Observatory sessions are offered as part of the course.
Offered even semesters in even-number years.
Fulfills: BNS, Q
PHYS 103 - Formerly 7 - How Things Work (4)
Primarily for non-science majors, the course is a practical introduction to the physics of everyday life, focusing on the operation of objects in our daily environment. Potential objects for study include the roller coaster, musical instruments, automobile, television, laser, and nuclear reactor. Exploration of these devices leads to a conceptual understanding of general physics principles.
Meets: Four hours class Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BNS
PHYS AA2 - Laboratory in Cognition (2)
An optional laboratory course to be taken with or after completing PSYC+353. Students will explore the methodological and measurement practices that are commonly employed in cognitive psychology research by completing hands-on activities and projects. Multiple lab reports will be required.
Prerequisite: PSYC+255 Required. Corequisite: PSYC+353.
Fulfills: WI

PSCI

PSCI 211 - Formerly 10 - Law, Politics, and Society (4)
The course gives an overview of the entire legal system, the interaction between the different legal and political institutions and some of the more controversial issues in law and politics. There are four main parts of the course. The first part of the course deals with jurisprudence (theories of law); the second part focuses on legal institutions, namely courts, legal education, lawyers and juries; the third part identifies certain key issues and debates that have pervaded the legal lives of U.S. and non U.S. societies; and the fourth section concerns an assessment of the role of law and courts in politics and society.
Annually
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 301 - Formerly 101 - Civil Liberties (4)
An intensive investigation of the struggle within our legal system over the interpretation of the Bill of Rights. Reviews relevant cases and resulting opinions. Examines the behavior of the justices as well as issues involving the impact of and compliance with the court's decisions.
Offered annually.
PSCI 302 - Formerly 103 - Criminal Justice (4)
An examination of the three major criminal justice institutions-police, courts, and prisons. Emphasizes how our major cities are dealing with the problem of crime as well as the discretionary powers of critical actors within the justice system.
Offered annually.
PSCI 340 - Formerly 111 - Political Change and Development (4)
A survey of the literature on political development and social change with case studies drawn from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America.
Offered annually.
PSCI 341 - Formerly 112 - Comparative Political Participation (4)
Topics vary from semester to semester as the department may direct. Special topics include comparative issues, such as political parties, revolution, and political participation; country foci, such as the People's Republic of China, and the regional, political, and economic dynamics of Southeast Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
PSCI 329 - Formerly 113 - Principles of International Law (4)
This course introduces the student to the main principles, key texts and most famous cases of the international legal system. Aimed specifically at the liberal arts context, the course approaches these legal materials historically and geographically. The first half of the semester sets out the ramifications of the equal sovereignty of nation- states in this state-centered system. The second half explores the reach of these sovereign states into other states' territories, into the oceans around us, and the universe beyond. The tensions between this system of sovereignty and recent developments in international commercial, environmental and human rights law are a recurring theme of the course.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 305 - Formerly 115 - Political Sociology (4)
For course description, see Sociology listings.
Same as: SOC+115. Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
PSCI 310 - Formerly 117 - Research Methods in Politcal Science (4)
An overview of basic research methods used in political science. Emphasizes research designs and statistical methods appropriate to political and public policy problems. With the help of the instructor, students develop and implement their own research designs on relevant political topics.
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: Q
PSCI 360 - Formerly 119 - Selected Studies in International Politics (4)
An examination of central problems related to the organization and function of the contemporary international system. Topics have included the Vietnam experience and the role of the intelligence community in foreign policy.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
PSCI 212 - Formerly 12 - Public Policy and Administration (4)
An examination of the public policy process in the United States, including agenda setting, program adoption, and program implementation. Emphasizes how national political institutions-Congress, the presidency, the federal judiciary, and the bureaucracy-shape policy outcomes.
Annually.
PSCI 319 - Formerly 121 - Selected Studies in American Politics and Administration (4)
Topics vary as the department may direct. Topics have included state politics, policy analysis, media and politics, and politics and culture.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
PSCI 306 - Formerly 122 - American Political Parties and Interest Groups (4)
This course examines the origins, structure and political functions of political parties and interest groups in the U.S. Topics include strategies and influence of interest groups in American politics, the development and significance of the two-party system in the U.S., and recent changes in both types of political institutions and their relationship to each other. This is a writing intensive seminar and students should be prepared to write a significant number of papers of varying length and will be expected to extensively revise their work.
Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI, DUS
PSCI 331 - Formerly 126 - Seminar in Political Philosophy (4)
A study of a movement, problem, or thinker in political theory. Examples are the communitarian critics of liberal democratic theory, John Rawls, personality structure and polity, religion and the state, Kant's political philosophy, the death penalty, anarchism, altruism, the future of socialism, recent conservatives.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered annually.
PSCI 308 - Formerly 129 - Urban Policy Research (4)
An analysis of the major political and social problems facing urban governments. Examples of policy issues studied are education, housing, crime, and transportation. Students conduct empirical research examining a selected policy issue.
Prerequisite: PSCI+128 Offered in alternate years.
PSCI 330 - Formerly 130 - Philosophy of Law (4)
A critical appraisal of various theories of law: the theory of natural law, legal positivism, legal realism, and the recent critical legal studies movement. An investigation of the limits of the authority of society over the individual, including the issues of paternalism and privacy. A study of different theories of punishment and the scope of responsibility for criminal behavior.
Offered in alternate years. Same as: PHIL+130
PSCI 332 - Formerly 131 - Selected Studies in Political Theory (2-4)
A study of topics in political theory, varying from semester to semester as the department may direct.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
PSCI 361 - Formerly 134 - Latin America and U.S. Foreign Policy (4)
An examination of current relations between the United States and Latin American states, as well as the history, doctrines, institutions, objectives, and interests that shape these relations.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 362 - Formerly 135 - International Political Economy (4)
An examination of the relationship between international politics and international economics with emphasis on the impact of market phenomena on the politics of an increasingly complex and interdependent state system. An examination of the ways that states use economic means to achieve international political ends.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Offered annually.
PSCI 363 - Formerly 136 - The National Security Council (4)
A semester-long simulation of the United States National Security Council. Real security problems facing the United States are addressed in real time with students assuming actual positions on the NSC. By invitation only.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually.
PSCI 342 - Formerly 137 - Europe in World Affairs (4)
An examination of the problems of the contemporary European region. Areas of study include security, economics, and foreign policy as well as the institutions, such as EU and NATO, that manage these areas. Focuses on problems within the region as well as relations with the rest of the world.
Offered annually.
PSCI 364 - Formerly 138 - Collective Conflict Management (4)
An examination of international techniques for the mitigation of interstate and intrastate conflict. A research seminar that analyzes and evaluates contemporary cases of peacekeeping; military, economic, and/or diplomatic sanctions; humanitarian intervention; etc.
Prerequisite: PSCI+4 or equivalent; junior or senior standing. Offered annually.
PSCI 333 - Formerly 139 - International Human Rights (4)
An interdisciplinary study of international human rights norms in national and international contexts. Topics are selected from the following list: universalism and cultural relativism, the correlation of rights and duties, civil and political rights, economic and social rights, intergovernmental and nongovernmental institutions, universal and regional regimes, human rights and foreign policy, democratization, women's rights, individual criminal responsibility, development, and the transformed conceptions of statehood and sovereignty.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 225 - Formerly 14 - European Politics (4)
A study of the political systems of selected European countries within a comparative framework. Topics may include political culture, party systems, ideology, parliamentary systems, and public policies.
Offered Annually.
PSCI 365 - Formerly 140 - Seminar on Human Rights (4)
An in-depth study of one or several of these problems in the philosophy of human rights: human rights and rationality, human rights and religion(s), human rights and the problem of implementation, social and economic human rights, human rights and education, human rights and moral development, human rights and the rights of peoples, human rights and cultural relativism.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered annually.
PSCI 309 - Formerly 141 - Seminar on Public Policy (4)
An examination of public policy issues in terms of the criteria typically used in policy analysis, e.g., political dynamics, costs and benefits, decision making, administration, and budget implications. The specific issues vary according to the material available on them and their timeliness. Thus, in some years, the focus might be trade policy or economic policy more generally, while in other years, domestic social policy could be the focus. The central goal of exploring the issue using policy analysis criteria remains constant. The course is intended to be a research seminar with students producing and presenting a major project at the end of the term.
Course may be repeated. Offered in alternate years.
PSCI 311 - Formerly 142 - Seminar on American Political Participation (4)
An examination of the various forms of American political participation. The course focuses on such activities as elections, social movements, civil disobedience, and political violence. The class also examines the causes and effects of non-participation. A central goal is to investigate the democratic theories that underpin American politics.
Course may be repeated. Offered fall semester.
PSCI 320 - Formerly 146 - Environmental Policy and Politics (4)
This course examines environmental policy and politics in the U. S. It considers the role of American political institutions and political dynamics in the development of environmental policy. Within this general framework, the course studies specific environmental policies in terms of their origins, development, and consequences. Finally, the course considers international environmental policy and the U. S. role in it.
Enrollment is limited to Political Sciences majors or minors with junior or senior standing. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BSS, WI
PSCI 366 - Formerly 149 - Development in Africa (4)
This course provides a close examination of development-the history, the dominant theories, the successes and failures-focusing on the African continent. The intent is to give students an understanding of how attitudes toward development have changed, what alternative approaches have been or are being tried, and how international efforts have interacted with African politics to create the current conditions on the continent. A comparative approach is also employed, to examine why strategies that worked in other places, for example Asia or Latin America, have been less successful in Africa.
PSCI 226 - Formerly 15 - Russian Politics (4)
A survey of the democratization of Russia by examining the Soviet legacy and recent developments in the political, social, and economic order in Russia since the collapse of communism.
PSCI 312 - Formerly 151 - Democratic Theory (4)
Democratic theory is one of the most important themes of contemporary political science. Democratization is a vital phenomenon studied by political scientists and the health of established democracies is an ongoing point discussed within the discipline. This course examines the historical debates that have animated political theory for over two thousand years and helps place those debates in a contemporary context. After providing that background, students are introduced to many 20th and 21st century theorists and the theoretical discourse as it has developed in the last 50 years.
PSCI 300 - Formerly 152 - Independent Study in Political Science (2-4)
Independent investigation of a topic selected in conference with the instructor and approved by the department. One meeting weekly; oral and written reports.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Admission by petition to or by invitation of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: One year of political science and permission of the instructor Offered each semester.
PSCI 313 - Formerly 155 - Gender and U.S. Politics (4)
An analysis of the relationship between gender and politics from various theoretical perspectives. Focuses on the multiple ways that gender, race, and class have influenced political participation and political institutions at the at the grass roots, state, and national levels. Explores the construction of women's political interests and how those interests are, and have been, represented in political life in the United States.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: DUS, BSS
PSCI 367 - Formerly 156 - Seminar on Gender and International Politics (4)
An analysis and examination of gender issues in international politics with either a regional or thematic focus. The central goal of the course will be to explore how gender, race, class, nation and sexuality are core components of the discourse and practice of international politics. Such topics as gender and Latin American politics, gender and international political economy, international women's organizing, and gender and postcolonial theory will be among those regularly presented.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 314 - Formerly 159 - American Political Economy (4)
This course explores the relationship between politics and economics in the U.S. The course begins with a theoretical exploration of the relationship democracy and capitalism and examines the differences between government and market solutions to collective action problems. The second component of the course examines the political practices of business, labor, and other political actors. The last part of the course builds on the first two in an assessment of a range of public policies in the U.S. including, for example, economic policies, industrial relations, and employment policy.
Enrollment priority: Given to senior Political Sciences Majors. Prerequisite: PSCI+6 recommended. Offered in alternate years.
PSCI 227 - Formerly 16 - Latin American Politics (4)
An examination of the political process in Latin America, focusing on the impact of political culture, the role of social organization, and problems of political and economic development. These issues are examined both generally and in the study of particular Latin American political systems.
Offered Annually.
PSCI 368 - Formerly 160 - Intelligence and Covert Operations (4)
Policymakers are dependent on intelligence to help guide and inform their decision making. Indeed, intelligence provides a critical support role in all aspects of foreign policy and national security; it is often difficult to understand US actions without understanding not only the intelligence that was provided, but the process through which it came about. The purpose of this class is to provide students with an understanding of the roles and processes through which the intelligence community shapes national policy and the resulting impact on international relations in general. The course will not only address theoretical and practical bases and implications of intelligence, but will invite practitioners to discuss their experiences and their view of policy.
PSCI 369 - Formerly 161 - Strategies of War and Peace (4)
This class examines how and why states have worked throughout history to wage both war and peace. Although it is often assumed that peace exists when there is an absence of war, closer inquiry shows that real peace is the product of effort and planning rather than a default status. Moreover, war is often not the result of purposeful policy, rather an accident of misperception, error, and ambiguity. The class will examine a wide variety of time periods, ranging from ancient Greece to current events in the Middle East, with special emphasis on understanding the objectives of and motivations for war as well as the requirements for peace. One question the class will pose is whether war leads to peace, as we might expect, or perhaps, paradoxically, whether peace can lead to war. It will also look at the contemporary challenge of terrorism and how that may change state behaviors.

Fulfills: WI
PSCI 344 - Formerly 162 - Torture:Pain, Body, and Truth (4)
Torture has become a subject of much debate in the post-9/11 world. In this course, we start with this fascination with the subject to historically, philosophically, and conceptually analyze the debates on torture. The aim is to analyze the different dimensions of torture: its existence in different societies, its nature, its relationship with pain and truth, its impact, and finally the control of the state over bodies and lives in modern society.
PSCI 345 - Formerly 167 - War and Peace in the Middle East (4)
Wars and numerous peacemaking initiatives have affected the Middle East's socio-economic and political development. Why has this region been marred by wars? Is the lack of democratic structures or strong regional organizations built on neo-liberal principles the problem? Or is it the legacy of imperialism and the continued interference of the great powers? This course will provide answers to these questions by studying three conflicts: (1) the Arab-Israeli conflict, especially the struggle between Israelis and Palestinians; (2) Lebanon's civil war (1975-1990); and (3) the U.S.-Iraq conflict (1991-present).
Offered in alternate years.
PSCI 371 - Formerly 169 - Peacemaking and Peacebuilding (4)
This course examines approaches to maintaining international peace and security and how they may have changed in the twenty-first century. It addresses peacemaking in the context of both intra and interstate war, although it focuses particularly on the challenge of resolving civil conflict. Various approaches to mediation and their effectiveness will be addressed, as will the sustainability of negotiated versus military settlements and the effectiveness of peacekeeping and peace building. The course will also consider philosophical debates on the propriety of intervention in light of traditional norms of international relations, particularly sovereignty and noninterference, and the difficulty of reconciling humanitarian interests with the rules governing state behaviors.
Offered in alternate years
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 110 - Formerly 17 - Contemporary Approaches to Political Science (2)
An overview of basic research methods used in political science. Emphasizes research designs and statistical methods appropriate to political and public policy problems. With the help of the instructor, students develop and implement their own research designs on relevant political topics.
To be determined.
PSCI 383 - Formerly 170 - The United Nations System and the International Community (4)
On-site exposure to the realities of international politics in the United Nations context. An examination of the evolution of the United Nations and the network of international institutions associated with it. An analysis of the role played by the United Nations in the larger international community. Classes are conducted at the Drew University facilities near the U.N. in New York City.
Prerequisite: PSCI+4 Corequisite: PSCI+172 and PSCI+171 (optional) Offered annually.
Fulfills: WI
PSCI 384 - Formerly 172 - Research Seminar on the United Nations (4)
Students conduct research on selected topics related to the United Nations and its role in the larger international system. Assignments include the preparation of a major research paper designed to develop techniques appropriate to the analysis of international affairs. Classes are conducted at the Drew University facilities near the U.N. plaza in New York City.
Prerequisite: PSCI+4 Corequisite: PSCI+170 and PSCI+171 (optional). Offered annually.
Fulfills: WI
PSCI 385 - Formerly 174 - Policy Making in Washington (4)
A seminar focusing on the interactions among individuals and institutions that characterize the policy process in Washington. Includes meetings with active participants in the policy process: members of Congress and officials of the executive branch, the judiciary, political parties, interest groups, and the press. Seminar meetings are built around discussion of current policy issues but also include instruction in research methods that aid students in successfully pursuing the research project required under PSCI+175.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Corequisite: PSCI+173 Offered spring semester.
PSCI 386 - Formerly 175 - Research Projects: Washington (4)
Preparation of research projects to develop research techniques in the area of American politics.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered spring semester.
PSCI 381 - Formerly 176 - Contemporary British Politics (4)
A discussion and an analysis of current issues in British politics with an emphasis on the impact these issues have on the functioning and development of the British political system. Explores such topics as the roles of Parliament, cabinet government, the prime minister, political parties, and interest groups. Outside speakers who are active politicians and field trips to political institutions and events are an integral part of this course. Required of all students and offered in the London program.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: HIST+176
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 228 - Formerly 18 - Chinese Politics (4)
China, the world's largest country and one of the few remaining nominally communist nations, is undergoing unprecedented social, economic, and political chance. This course surveys China's contemporary political history, the reform movement, and China's transition from communism.
Annually.
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 380 - Formerly 182 - Research Tutorial (4)
Each student conducts research and writes a paper on a topic approved by the London program instructor. The project stresses normal library research as well as personal interviews and other out-of-class experiences as part of the research process. Students are urged to consult with their home campus adviser about their topic before going to London.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: THEA+182 HIST+198 ENGL+182
PSCI 388 - Formerly 185 - European Research Seminar (4)
Each student designs and conducts an independent research project on a topic selected in consultation with the Resident Director of the European Semester and approved by the appropriate departmental liaison. The project will stress library research, as well as personal interviews, and may include trips to appropriate EU member states. (Students may also register as an independent study in any approved major)
Offered fall semester.
PSCI 382 - Formerly 189 - The History of Modern Britain (4)
A study of the historical and practical forces that have shaped today's Britain, with primary emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The course focuses on various themes-the evolution and role of the monarchy, the emergence of the welfare state, the rise and fall of the Empire, the relationships between Britain and America as well as Britain and Europe.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: HIST+143
Fulfills: BH
PSCI 229 - Formerly 19 - Middle East Politics (4)
A comparative study of the political process in the Middle East and North Africa, exploring the political foundations of the traditional societies, the political bases of social change, and political development.
Offered Annually.
Fulfills: DIT
PSCI 400 - Formerly 190 - Capstone Seminar (2)
This course integrates the political science major and provides a unified culminating experience for students. Not only will it serve as a means of pulling together the different strands of political science into a coherent whole, but it will also allow for effective evaluation of students' ability to both think about and apply what they have learned in previous classes. It will be taught in seminar format. When there are two sections taught in the same semester, the sections will have shared speakers and faculty, and the two groups will occasionally be brought together for larger sessions, talks, and projects. Assignments for the course will consist of essays and a major paper. Students also participate in analysis of a major political event. The analysis includes oral presentation by each student in a seminar at the end of the term.
PSCI 315 - Formerly 191 - Contemporary Theories of Liberalism and Conservatism (4)
This is a course on contemporary theories of liberalism and conservatism. Two of the most important philosophies of politics of the 20th century and the 21st century, particularly in the United States, are variations of liberalism and classic conservative thought. This course introduces students to those debates via direct readings of major 20th century or contemporary political theorists. The course also includes various counter theorists in the Marxist, post-modernist and feminist traditions who critique the dominant philosophies of the era. This is a writing intensive seminar and students should be prepared to write a significant number of papers of varying length and will be expected to extensively revise their work.

Fulfills: WI
PSCI 346 - Formerly 192 - Comparative Political Economy (4)
This course covers key issues of comparative political economy in advanced liberal democracies, including welfare states development and decline, labour markets, income distribution, inequality, social risks and exclusion as well as the role of gender in the welfare state.
Offered annually.
PSCI 343 - Formerly 193 - Comparative Political Parties (4)
This course introduces political parties in advanced liberal democracies from a comparative perspective. Issues to be examined in the course include the origin and function of parties, party organization, the social and economic basis for parties, the impact of issues and ideologies, the party system and its evolution, radical left and right parties, and the decline or adaptation of parties.
Offered annually.
PSCI 347 - Formerly 194 - Seminar in Comparative Revolutions (4)
This course is an expansive investigation into how revolution has been conceptualized across nearly 100 years of research in the social sciences. The course will compare theories on when, why, and under what conditions various types of revolution occur in the context of studying a wide variety of revolutionary movements. We also ask why some revolutions fail while others don't. We look at structural reasons, economic pressures, cultural frameworks, the impact of external interests in a country's stability, and role of ideology in revolution. We end with a discussion of the nature of revolution in light of current 'revolts' 'rebellions' 'social movements' and 'uprisings' that span the mid-2Oth century to the present. This course will bring together a number of theoretical strands in the discipline including political economy, state-society relations, the international setting, state-building, state-failure, and the role of culture in politics as frameworks for understanding the nature of revolution.
Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Offered spring semester in alternate years.
PSCI 303 - Formerly 196 - Constitutional Law and Civil Rights (4)
This course examines the structure and functioning of the United States Supreme Court the theories about judicial decision making, and legal and political debates on civil rights. Following the discussions on judicial review, federalism and separation of powers, the course will look historically on the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of the equal protection clause in relation to race, gender, culture, and immigration among other issues. Discussion will focus not only on landmark cases in constitutional law but also on the ways in which other legal actors, such as lawyers and interest groups, play a role in determining the nature and outcome of cases. We will look throughout at the relationship between law and politics as well as at the socio-cultural context in which judicial decisions are made.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS
PSCI 317 - Formerly 197 - Education Policy and Politics (4)
This course will analyze both the politics and the policy of schooling in the United States. On the political side, we will explore the debate over the purposes of public education and the use of education as an electoral issue, as well as the individuals, groups, and institutions that compete to control schools, and how and where they seek to advance their different interests and values. On the policy side, we will analyze the impact of democratic control, federalism, and checks and balances on the provision of education in the U.S. and how and why school governance has evolved over time. The course will also examine the debates over specific school reforms such as: standards and testing, equalization of school finance, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act, as well as the unique challenges facing urban schools.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS
PSCI 318 - Formerly 198 - Race and Politics (4)
This course will examine the role of race in American politics and its contemporary significance to the nation's citizens, politicians, and governmental institutions. Questions will include: What are the primary intra- and inter-group dynamics that shape contemporary minority politics? How do the politics of race intersect with the politics of class and gender? What opportunities and challenges exist in mobilizing the members of minority groups for political action in the U.S.? What role have racial issues and attitudes played in the electoral strategies of political parties and candidates and in the electoral choices of voters? How do the structures and processes of American political institutions affect the efforts of minority groups to secure political influence? How has the rise to power of minority politicians-particularly in many urban areas-affected policymaking? How successful have minority groups been in their quest to use government to expand economic and educational opportunity? How are demographic forces likely to reshape the politics of race and -American politics more generally- in the 21st century?
Offered annually.
Fulfills: WI, DUS
PSCI 102 - Formerly 2 - Comparative Political Systems (4)
An introductory study of political systems of the world and the body of theory and concepts used in their comparison. Emphasis on such topics as governing institutions and processes, parties, political economy, and policy. The specific countries and problems covered may vary from term to term, depending on the instructor.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 240 - Formerly 20 - United States Foreign Policy (4)
A historical and policy analysis of United States foreign policy. Emphasizes central themes running through U.S. global behavior, current policy processes, and specific issues of concern to U.S. decision makers.
Offered Annually.
PSCI 213 - Formerly 23 - Congress (4)
An analysis of the beliefs, attitudes, and behavior of legislative actors. Explores the role conception of legislators and the patterns of interaction in which they engage, following an examination of the legislative recruitment process. Special attention is given to the committee system, leadership structure, and decisional activity of each house of Congress.
Offered alternate years.
PSCI 214 - Formerly 24 - American Political Campaigns (4)
An examination of the place of campaigns in American politics, analyzing the factors that shape their content and outcome and considering their effect on the structure of the political process and on public policy. Possible reforms to the process are also a main consideration of the class.
Offered in alternate years.
PSCI 215 - Formerly 25 - The American Presidency (4)
Seeks to understand the development of the role of the presidency and to evaluate its importance in the modern American political system. Major issues considered include the nature of presidential leadership, the relationship of the presidency to other branches of government, public expectations of the president, and the effect of individual presidents.
Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 217 - Formerly 26 - Political Participation In The US (4)
This course examines the way Americans participate in politics by covering varied topics that share a link to the interaction between the person and government. The course considers the importance of public opinion, voting, interest groups, political parties, and the media with respect to this crucial interaction. With a solid grounding in these topics, students examine different means of participations, including elections, interest group membership, social movements, and direct interaction with policy makers.
PSCI 216 - Formerly 27 - Urban Politics (4)
An analysis and examination of urban problems and policy making with particular attention to formal and informal power structures in the urban political environment.
Offered fall semester.
PSCI 255 - Formerly 28 - Classics in Political Theory (4)
An investigation of the philosophical and historical foundations of some of the major contemporary political ideologies. Though the emphasis may change from offering to offering, the following belief systems are most likely included: anarchism and utopianism, communitarianism and nationalism, liberalism and libertarianism, fascism and racism, socialism and communism, Catholicism and fundamentalism, liberation ideologies and human rights. The course requires the reading of classic texts in the various ideologies selected for study, and it seeks to foster critical thinking about what is involved in the adoption of a political ideology.
Every semester.
Fulfills: BH
PSCI 101 - Formerly 3 - Introduction to the United Nations System (4)
This course will serve as an introduction to the United Nations (UN) and its affiliated organizations. The course will familiarize students with the procedures and decision making bodies of the UN and allow them to observe the substantive discussions of its various committees. It will also introduce students to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that are represented at the UN and the agencies that operate under its umbrella. The course will be conducted in Drew's classroom at the UN as well as on Drew's main campus. Each week will feature a number of speakers from either the UN or NGOs and, when appropriate, time observing committee activities at the UN. Topics to be addressed include failed states, peace-building, terrorism, the millennium development goals, and human rights. Students will learn research techniques and gain familiarity in working with both primary and secondary source materials. Projects will consist of short papers related to the specific topics addre
For High School Students Only.
PSCI 230 - Formerly 33 - East Asian Politics (4)
A comparative study of the political process in East Asia, exploring the political foundations of the contemporary Chinese, Japanese, and North and South Korean systems, the social dynamics of change in those countries, and the relationship between the state and the private sector in East Asia.
Offered annually.
PSCI 104 - Formerly 4 - International Relations (4)
A consideration of both the realities and theoretical foundations of international relations. Themes covered include nationalism, statehood, diplomacy and negotiation, foreign policy decision-making, international political economy, global integration movements, war and other forms of international conflict, international law and organization.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 241 - Formerly 54 - Global Feminisms (4)
This course examines women's movements internationally and globally. It explores the variations in constructions of sex, gender and gender difference as well as the range of feminisms and women's movements that have emerged from these differing cultural, exonomic and political situations. Such topics as women and development, the sexual division of labor, health, the environment, the international traffic in women and human rights may be among those explored in the course.
Offered fall semester. Same as: WGST+52
Fulfills: BI, DIT
PSCI 103 - Formerly 6 - American Government and Politics (4)
A study of institutions and politics in the American political system. Ways of thinking about how significant problems and conflicts are resolved through the American political process.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 242 - Formerly 64 - International Organizations (4)
The theory and practice of international organizations (IOs) is a dynamic and increasingly important dimension of world politics. Scholars debate whether IOs serve as venues in which learning processes can occur and expectations about norms of international interaction can be created and reinforced, or whether they are merely another venue in which states pursue their national interests. This course will provide an introduction to the field, focusing on the role of IOs in three principal areas: peace and security, human rights, and humanitarian and development assistance. It will serve as a particularly relevant class for students who may want to participate in the UN or Brussels semesters, as it will provide a grounding in various theories of IOs and their value in the international system.

Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 256 - Formerly 65 - Selected Studies in Political Science (2-4)
An intermediate open topics course in political science. Topics will vary with faculty interest and staffing and might deal with specific policies (healthcare, environmental reforms, etc), events (the presidential election of 2012, the war in Afghanistan) or specific political problems or ideas (the challenge of freedom, the concept of civil disobedience).
This course may repeated.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 200 - Formerly 66 - Internship in Political Science (2-4)
Students desiring an internship experience and wanting credit toward the political science major or minor must enroll in the practicum. The internship should be selected in consultation with the practicum director and must conform to all CLA and department requirements for a four-credit or a two-credit internship. The practicum will meet periodically during the semester to: 1) evaluate the internship work experience, 2) discuss links to related course theory, 3) receive training in applied field research, and 4) write a significant paper linking theory and internship learning.
Not normally repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in an appropriate upper level political science course. Offered every semester.
PSCI 259 - Formerly 67 - Global Governance and Counter-Terrorism (2)
This course explores the nexus between globalization and terrorism and how global governance networks have developed strategies to counter terrorism in the post-9/11 era. Themes covered include: the transnationalization of counter-terrorism policies, the role of the United Nations in the fight against terrorism and terrorism-related activities (i.e. terrorism financing), and how global governance networks pressure states to comply with international standards.
PSCI 243 - Formerly 68 - Terrorism (4)
Americans have paid closer attention to terrorism after the September 11, 2001 attacks. However, terrorism is neither new nor a distinctive threat to the United States. In fact, terrorist attacks have been commonplace since 1945. This course presents an overview of terrorism's evolution in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This course is divided into four parts. Part one provides a historical overview of terrorism and distinguishes it from other forms of political violence. Part two compares and contrasts ethno-nationalists and religious terrorist organizations, showing that both groups, while informed by different mindsets, use terrorist tactics in an attempt to achieve clear political ends. Part three examines the evolving strategic logic of suicide terrorism. Part four shows how the forces of globalization are changing the scope and strategies terrorist groups employ.

Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 283 - Formerly 71 - UN Community Internship (2-8)
All students are encouraged to work at an internship with one of the many organizations associated with the UN. Internships substantially enrich your UN semester academic experience, often provide greater access to the related workinds of the UN itself, and provide you with a usefel firsthand view of careers related to the UN and the broader international community of organizations. This practicum helps students evaluate the work experience through a reflective paper and journal, and identify appropriate links with related course concepts and theory.
Internships will normally require you to work for a total of 15 hours usually spread over 3 days a week. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSCI+4 Corequisite: PSCI+170 and 172. Offered annually.
PSCI 285 - Formerly 73 - Internship Project in Washington (8)
An educational experience that allows students to test classroom hypotheses in a "real world" political environment. Students work in an approved government or government-related office. Evaluation of work performance is made by a field supervisor, and students are required to write one or more analytical papers related to the experience. Required readings in the academic literature provide a foundation for understanding and interpreting the internship experience.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Corequisite: Corequisite PSCI+173.
PSCI 105 - Formerly 8 - Introduction to Political Theory (4)
An investigation of the philosophical and historical foundations of some of the major contemporary political ideologies. Though the emphasis may change from offering to offering, the following belief systems are most likely included: anarchism and utopianism, communitarianism and nationalism, liberalism and libertarianism, fascism and racism, socialism and communism, Catholicism and fundamentalism, liberation ideologies and human rights. The course requires the reading of classic texts in the various ideologies selected for study, and it seeks to foster critical thinking about what is involved in the adoption of a political ideology.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
PSCI 244 - Formerly 99 - Africa in International Politics (4)
Is Africa the forgotten continent? This class looks at Africa's involvement in international relations from a variety of perspectives, including political and economic development, state consolidation, and violent conflict. Students will examine theoretical perspectives on how and why African states have developed as they have, as well as case studies of specific regions and countries. Both approaches will focus on the influence of world events and external actors on political and economic outcomes on the continent. The course is divided into three sections, which examine Africa's international role during the colonial, post-colonial/Cold War, and post-Cold War periods.
Offered annually.
Fulfills: DIT

PSYC

PSYC 345 - Formerly 107 - Theories of Personality (4)
An examination of major theories of personality with emphasis on strategies for studying personality, including psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, trait and factor, and transpersonal. Also examines psychotherapies as implementations of personality theory.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3, second year or higher standing
PSYC 348 - Formerly 108 - Abnormal Psychology (4)
An examination of the theories of psychopathology with emphasis on current theoretical models and the relationships of the study of psychopathology to social issues. Discussion of the nature, classification, causes, and treatment of major forms of psychopathology.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3, second year or higher standing required Offered spring semester.
PSYC 230 - Formerly 11 - Life Span Development (4)
An examination of development across the life span with an emphasis on evaluation of major theoretical approaches to biological, social, cognitive, and personality development.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3.
PSYC 342 - Formerly 113 - Social Psychology (4)
An examination of how people think about, influence, and relate to others, as well as the ways in which their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are affected by situations and social contexts. Topics include the social self, attribution, social cognition, attitudes and persuasion, social influence, attraction and relationships, stereotyping, aggression, and pro-social behaviors.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3, PSYC+14 and third-year or higher standing Offered every semester.
PSYC 312 - Formerly 114 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (4)
A course in advanced research methodology in which upper-level students will design and execute an independent research project in psychology.
Strongly recommended for all psychology majors, especially those who intend to complete an honor's thesis in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC+14, third year or higher standing. General topic and other prerequisites announced at time of registration. Offered each semester.
Fulfills: WI
PSYC 351 - Formerly 115 - Learning and Behavior (4)
This course examines the mechanisms of learning, with content derived from human and non-human research. Topics include non-associative learning, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, observational learning, drug addiction, and the biological substrates of learning. In addition to examining basic learning mechanisms, the course explores the ways in which principles derived from basic research are applied in educational and clinical settings.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3, PSYC+4, and PSYC+14, or one year of college biology.
PSYC 353 - Formerly 117 - Cognition (4)
An examination of both the data and theory of cognition including such topics as: attention, perception, memory, imagery, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3 and either PSYC+14 or one year of college biology Offered annually.
PSYC 354 - Formerly 118 - Cognitive Neuroscience (4)
This course examines the mechanisms by which the nervous system supports higher mental functions, with a focus on how neural structures represent and transform information. The course draws on a variety of disciplines including cognitive psychology, neurobiology, computer science, linguistics, and philosophy. Discussion topics include perception, attention, memory, language, executive function, emotion, development, social cognition, consciousness, and neuroethics. Laboratory and off-campus activities will expose students to a variety of empirical research techniques, such as functional neuroimaging, single-neuron electrophysiology, and electroencephalography, commonly employed in cognitive neuroscience research.
Meets: Three hours class Prerequisite: NEUR - Formerly NEUR - Formerly NEURO+10 or PSYC+14 and PSYC+19 or permission of instructor Offered annually Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEUR - Formerly NEURO+118
PSYC 120 - History of Psychology (4)
A consideration of the origins of psychology with attention to its European roots, development in the American schools, and transition to its current forms.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3 and third-year or higher standing Offered fall semester.
PSYC 394 - Formerly 124 - Directed Research in Psychology (1-4)
Laboratory or field experience in psychology. Students participate in weekly lab meetings and all phases of ongoing psychological research.
Final paper required. Number of credits are established at the time of registration. May be repeated for credit up to four times. Enrollment priority: Limited enrollment; consult department chair. Prerequisite: PSYC+3 and PSYC+14 Offered each semester.
PSYC 370 - Formerly 130 - Advanced Topics in Psychology (2-4)
An in-depth exploration of a specialized issue or topic in psychology. Selected topic and number of credits is determined at time of registration.
Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: PSYC+3 and second-year standing or higher. Other prerequisites to be announced at time of registration. Offering to be determined
PSYC 396 - Formerly 134 - Independent Research in Psychology (2-4)
Independent laboratory or field research in psychology on a topic chosen in consultation with a faculty sponsor.
A final research report is required. An approved research proposal is required prior to the beginning of the research project. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Signature of instructor is required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+3, PSYC+14, and PSYC+114.
PSYC 211 - Formerly 14 - Research Methods in Psychology (4)
An examination of research methods and statistical analysis in psychology, with emphasis on experimental methodologies. Students will gain experience in all aspects of empirical research and writing.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3, PSYC+4, and a C- or better in MATH+3
Fulfills: Q
PSYC 360 - Formerly 140 - Psychology Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Psychology (1-4)
A review and discussion of contemporary issues in psychological theory and practice. Issues explored change from time to time. Selections are made by the department and announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Announced at time of registration Offering to be determined.
PSYC 362 - Formerly 142 - Seminar in the Psychology of Women (2-4)
A review of research focusing on women. Draws upon findings from the various subfields of psychology, including stereotyping, the social construction of gender, female personality development, women and mental health, gender differences in brain lateralization, hormonal influences on behavior, the psychology of women's health, and coping with victimization. Considers how psychological methodology enhances (or obfuscates) our knowledge about women's lives and experiences. The interface between psychology of women as a subfield of psychology and mainstream psychology is explored.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+3
PSYC 363 - Formerly 143 - Seminar in Developmental Psychology (2-4)
An investigation of one or more subject areas in developmental psychology. Topics vary with instructor expertise. Specific topic is announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+11 offering to be determined
PSYC 364 - Formerly 144 - Seminar in Biopsychology (2-4)
A review and discussion of current problems in the biological determinants of behavior. The particular issues explored are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+19 Offering to be determined Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+144
PSYC 365 - Formerly 145 - Seminar in Social Psychology (2-4)
An investigation of one of more subject areas in social psychology. Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Specific topic is announced at registration. Amount of credit is established at the time of registration. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor is required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+113 Offering to be determined.
PSYC 366 - Formerly 146 - Seminar in Learning, Memory, and Cognition (2-4)
An investigation of one or more subject areas in learning, memory, or cognition. Topics vary with instructor expertise. Specific topics are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+115 or PSYC+117 as announced at registration Offering to be determined.
PSYC 367 - Formerly 147 - Seminar in Social Issues of Psychology (2-4)
Psychology has an almost 60-year history of involvement with social issues and social reform. This seminar focuses on psychological research on specific social issues as well as psychology's role in developing social policy and social intervention related to that issue. Possible issues include poverty and homelessness; prejudice, racism, and genocide; and war and peace. The specific social issue to be studied is announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+3 Offering to be determined
PSYC 368 - Formerly 148 - Seminar in Psychotherapy (2-4)
A detailed study of the theory of specific psychotherapies with an emphasis on the implications of those theories for our understanding of both normal and abnormal human functioning. Not intended as training in psychotherapeutic technique. At times the course reviews a variety of therapeutic systems, and at times the focus is on a specific approach to therapy. The specific topic for each offering of the seminar is announced prior to registration.
This course may be repeated for credit when the specific therapeutic systems reviewed are different. Open only to students with third year or higher standing. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+3 Offering to be determined
PSYC 369 - Formerly 149 - Seminar in Industrial Organizational Psychology (4)
A review of psychological theory and methodology as it applies to human behavior in the workplace. Topics include basic measurement theory, testing and assessment, personnel selection, job satisfaction, work motivation, leadership, and organization theory.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Recommended: A course in statistics such as MATH 117 - Formerly 3 - or equivalent Prerequisite: PSYC+3, third-year or higher standing
PSYC 207 - Formerly 17 - Small-Group Dynamics (4)
An examination of the phases of small-group development and the intrinsic factors that influence its unique evolution.
Enrollment limit: 12 Enrollment priority: first- and second-year students Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSYC+3
PSYC 207E - Formerly 17E - THE SMALL GROUP EXPERIENCE (2)
An exploration of the processes that contribute to group formation with a special focus on the small group experience.
Enrollment is limited to first year students enrolled in the EOS program. Offered summer session every year.
PSYC 220 - Formerly 19 - Biological Psychology (4)
An examination of the biological bases of behavior. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of neuronal interactions, sensory systems, behavioral development, motivation, learning, memory, and psychopathology.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3 and either PSYC+4 or a BIOL laboratory course. Same as: NEUR - Formerly NEURO+19
Fulfills: BI
PSYC 220L - Formerly 19L - Laboratory in Biological Psychology (1)
An optional laboratory course correlating with PSYC+19. Hands-on experience with physiological manipulations and behavioral measurement techniques used by biopsychologists.
Enrollment limit: 12 Enrollment priority: Students concurrently enrolled in PSYC 220 - Formerly 19 - . Meets: Three hours laboratory Corequisite: PSYC+19
PSYC 208 - Formerly 27 - Educational Psychology (4)
An exploration of the factors that facilitate learning within a classroom setting and implications for effective teacher practices. Focuses on cognitive development and socio-emotional learning, individual and cultural differences, intelligence, classroom processes, testing, and schools as social systems. Does not satisfy a portion of teacher certification requirements unless PSYC+11 is also taken.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3 Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PSYC 101 - Formerly 3 - Introduction to Psychology (4)
A consideration of the methods and discoveries of psychology in the study of behavior and experience. Includes both theoretical and experiential components. A prerequisite to all intermediate- and upper-level courses in psychology.
Students may not receive credit for both AP psychology and PSYC 101 - Formerly 3 - . Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
PSYC 270 - Formerly 30 - Selected Topics in Psychology: (2-4)
An examination of a contemporary issue or topic in psychology. Selected topic and number of credits is determined at time of registration.
Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: PSYC+3 Offering to be determined
PSYC 110 - Formerly 4 - Psychology Preceptorial (4)
Topics in psychology are examined through reading, writing, critical analysis, and class discussion. Emphasis is on critiquing the literature and methods of psychology and on scientific writing in the style of the American Psychological Association.
Prerequisite: PSYC+3 Corequisite or Prerequisite: MATH+3
Fulfills: WM
PSYC 231 - Formerly AA1 - Infancy and Childhood (4)
Infancy and Childhood. An examination of biological, cognitive, and social development during infancy and childhood. The course focuses on major theoretical approaches as well as current research findings and their application to understanding development during these life periods.
Enrollment priority: Psychology Prerequisite: PSYC+3

REL

REL 364 - Formerly 11 - South Asia Through Art and Text (4)
This course introduces students to the study of South Asia religions through both art and text. The course explores the relationships between these two major avenues of historical and contemporary record that are available to us for the study of religion. In exploring the dynamic interaction between art and text, we take into consideration the respective properties of each medium, including text's unfolding of story over the time it takes to read, while art favors an immediate visual impact. We also explore relevant contextual issues in South Asian history, aesthetics and authorship.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, BA, DIT
REL 320 - Formerly 112 - Seminar in Jewish Studies (4)
An in-depth study of a specific religious or philosophical aspect of Judaism, with an emphasis on the critical analysis of primary sources and traditional texts.
Course may be repeated. Same as: JWST+112
REL 241 - Formerly 113 - Studies in the Gospels (4)
A detailed consideration of materials in the canonical and noncanonical gospels. Focuses on the variety of ways in which Jesus and his message were understood.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
REL 242 - Formerly 114 - The Pauline Epistles (4)
An analysis of the letters of Paul, leading to an understanding of his significance in early Christianity and his contributions to subsequent Christian thought.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, WI, WM
REL 220 - Formerly 12 - The Jewish Experience: An Introduction to Judaism (4)
A survey of the basic religious doctrines, ritual practice, and philosophical schools of the Jewish religion, from biblical times to the present. The course includes the analysis of Jewish theology, rational philosophy, mysticism, messianism, religious ceremonies, family life-cycle, and rites of passage, as well as universal concepts.
Same as: JWST+12
Fulfills: BH
REL 312 - Formerly 120 - Classical Morality&Religious Ethics from Plato to Machiavel (4)
The course provides a history of classical moral thinking, both philosophical and theological, in the West by tracing this thought through Greek, Roman, and Christian philosophers, theologians, historians, dramatists, and Italian Renaissance Republicans. We will pay particular attention to how this intellectual history, found in philosophers and theologians, interacts with popular classical morality and piety as found in classical historians and dramatists, medieval morality dramatists, and biography. Topics to be covered will include but not be limited to: the nature of morality, moral realism, moral virtue, the relationship between tragedy and virtue, the goal of happiness and inner peace in the face of adversity, the interaction of religion and morality, love, marriage, friendship, sexual relations, raising children, and political ethics. The course will conclude with an overview of the recent revival of classical morality in religious and philosophical ethics.
Offered Fall semester in even years.
REL 249 - Formerly 121 - Modern Christian Lay Theologians (4)
A study of the works of selected 19th- and 20th-century Christian lay persons, many of them literary figures. The list of such nonprofessional and unofficial theologians includes Dostoevsky, Soren Kierkegaard, Khomiakov, Solovyov, Chesterton, Belloc, Charles Williams, Dorothy Sayers, C. S. Lewis, and T. S. Eliot. Announcement of specific figures to be studied is made in advance of course registration.
Offering to be determined.
REL 207 - Formerly 125 - Women and Religion (4)
A cross-cultural consideration of images of women in myth and scripture as related to women's actual roles in religious institutions and in societies at large.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined. Same as: CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+417S
REL 214 - Formerly 127 - Business Ethics (4)
A philosophical and theological study of those ethical, religious, and social issues that play an important role in thinking morally about economic and business practices. Attention is paid to practical ethical problems arising out of the functional areas of management and the wider areas of business and social responsibility in relation to the community, ecology, minorities, the role of multinationals and public safety.
Offered spring semester. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+127
REL 222 - Formerly 13 - Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (4)
A study of religious developments in ancient Israel in their historical contexts. Emphasizes the understandings of Israel as covenant people of God, the relation of religious understandings to historical and social circumstances, the role of prophecy, and the religious restoration following the exile.
Offered fall semester.
REL 216 - Formerly 130 - Bio-Medical Ethics (4)
An examination of the issues from religious and ethical perspectives. Topics include physician-patient relationships, death and dying, obtaining organs and tissues for transplantation, patient competence, assisted suicide and euthanasia, abortion, reproductive technologies, genetic testing and engineering, stem cell research and cloning, experiments on humans, rationing health care, and justice and public health.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH
REL 390 - Formerly 133 - Seminar in the Study of Religion (2-4)
An intensive study of topics chosen by the department.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH
REL 330 - Formerly 137 - Seminar in Christianity (4)
This course examines advanced questions in the study of Christianity. Topics will vary but include theology, ritual practice, history, and art. Students are expected to conduct primary research rooted in an understanding of relevant scholarship.

Fulfills: BH, WI
REL 230 - Formerly 14 - Introduction to the New Testament (4)
A study of the development of early Christian thought based on its earliest writings. Gives special treatment to the pre-literary origins of the gospel tradition, the variety of early theological assessments of Jesus of Nazareth, and the development of Gentile Christianity out of Jewish Christianity.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, WI
REL 208 - Formerly 143 - Religions of Africa (4)
An introduction to the basic themes within the traditional religions of Africa, including the nature of God, the significance of creation myths, the role of ancestors, the importance of religious leaders, and the problem of evil, sickness, and death. Explores the problematic Christian encounter with African religions, the Semitic connection and African Islam, and the role and function of the Independent African-Christian Churches.
Same as: ANTH+119 and PAST - Formerly PANAF+119. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BI, DIT, WI
REL 204 - Formerly 144 - Native American Religions (4)
This course investigates the origins of Native American religions, how they have changed, the reasons for those changes, and how Native Americans have influenced the beliefs of non Native Americans. History is the primary lens for this exploration. Issued such as Native American's relationship with nature and the supernatural are analyzed. Core concepts are presented and critically assessed with an emphasis on why Native Americans understandings mat differ from those of other religious groups. In the depth case studies are included, for example of Pueblos, Tainos, and Lakotas. The case studies may vary from year to year.
Offered in fall semester of even numbered years.
REL 350 - Formerly 145 - Seminar in Islamic Studies (4)
An intensive study of special topics in this field.
Offering to be determined.
REL 213 - Formerly 146 - Warefare and Ethics (4)
Moral and religious issues in warfare, including classical and contemporary views. The course will cover but not be limited to the following: Christian just war doctrine, moral realism and war, the rules of war, war crimes, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, nuclear weapons, spying and espionage, and war in Jewish and Islamic thought.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 362 - Formerly 149 - Women in Asian Religions (4)
This course examines critically the participation ofwomen in Asian religions. Possible topics include the nature of Goddesses, the social identity ofwomen as wives and mothers and the religious support or critique ofthese roles, biographies and teachings of female spiritual leaders, and the writings of female saints. One or more of these topics may be explored in a given offering of the course. The course will use methods from the history of religions and women's studies disciplines to pose and analyze issues of the construction and significance of gender in religious precepts and practices.
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: WI, DIT
REL 360 - Formerly 150 - Seminar in Asian Religions (4)
An advanced seminar-format study of a selected religious topic pertaining to South Asian, Southeast Asian, and East Asian cultures, considered either comparatively or specific to one of the cultures. Topics vary from year to year. Uses a variety of methodologies, including historical, anthropological, art historical, sociological and literature studies, on an interdisciplinary basis with the study of religion. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
REL 393 - Formerly 151 - Independent Study in Religion (4)
A tutorial course stressing independent investigation of a topic to be selected in conference with the instructor. Oral and written reports. Admission by petition to or upon invitation of the department.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Meets: every 2 weeks Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered each semester.
REL 218 - Formerly 152 - Environmental Ethics (4)
The course provides a study of the moral and religious aspects of such problems in human ecology as pollution, overpopulation, resource depletion, animal rights, global justice and much more. The course relates these issues to religious perspectives of human nature, responsibilities to the earth and to future generations. While the ecological data and principles prove indispensable, the primary intent of the course is to focus on how people make the date speak, on what they bring to ecological issues, on methods, on assumptions, and on language. This will require critical thinking skills such as analyzing, evaluating, and comparing. Offered in spring semester of odd numbered years.

Fulfills: BH, BI
REL 374 - Formerly 155 - Comparative Religion (4)
An advanced-level course in the study of Comparative Religion. This course engages students who have already completed coursework in Religious Studies with an advanced level of the comparative method in the study of religion, through the consideration of a topical aspect of religion across Eastern and Western religions. Topics may include textual, ritual, or artistic comparative themes across the religions. Attention is paid to issues that define the responsible practice of academic comparison among divergent religious traditions. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Offering to be determined.

Fulfills: BH
REL 375 - Formerly 156 - Comparative Religion: US Topics (4)
An advanced-level course in the study of Comparative Religion. This course engages students who have already completed coursework in Religious Studies with an advanced level of the comparative method in the study of religion, through the consideration of a topical aspect of religion across Eastern and Western religions. Topics may include textual, ritual, or artistic comparative themes across the religions. Attention is paid to issues that define the responsible practice of academic comparison among divergent religious traditions. This course focuses on engaging the comparative study of religion with religions in the United States. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
REL 376 - Formerly 157 - Comparative Religions: International Topics (4)
An advanced-level course in the study of Comparative Religion. This course engages students who have already completed coursework in Religious Studies with an advanced level of the comparative method in the study of religion, through the consideration of a topical aspect of religion across Eastern and Western religions. Topics may include textual, ritual, or artistic comparative themes across the religions. Attention is paid to issues that define the responsible practice of academic comparison among divergent religious traditions. This course focuses on engaging the comparative study of religion with religions in international countries. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 302 - Formerly 165 - Greek and Roman Religions (4)
An introduction to the religious thought and practices of the ancient Greeks, Romans, and (in this context) the early Christians. Topics include ritual, worship, and sacrifice; beliefs about the underworld and afterlife; the ancient mystery cults and the rise of Christianity; philosophical challenges to religion; the conflict of paganism and Christianity. Emphasis is placed on original literary, artistic, and archaeological sources.
Prerequisite: A previous Classics course (preferably CLAS - Formerly CLAS - Formerly CLAS - Formerly CL+25) or a previous REL course. Offering to be determined. Same as: CLAS - Formerly CLAS - Formerly CLAS - Formerly CL+165
Fulfills: BH
REL 301 - Formerly 169 - Religions of the Ancient Near East (4)
A study of the religions of Mesopotamia (Sumeria, Babylonia, Assyria), Egypt, Anatolia, and Syria-Palestine (Canaan, Aram) through analysis of literature and archaeological remains. Focuses on general religious questions and the interrelationship of Israel and other ancient Near Eastern cultures.
Offering to be determined. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+169
REL 400 - Formerly 199 - Capstone Independent Study in Religious Studies (2-4)
This course is the required Capstone course for majors in Religious Studies. Students design and complete a research paper with the guidance of their Advisor in the department. The work undertaken in fulfillment of this course must be a research project that results in a written minimum 25 page research paper for two credits or minimum 35 page research paper for four credits. The student will be expected to share her or his research in a departmental colloquium.
REL 231 - Formerly 20 - Introduction to Christianity (4)
An examination of major and minor Christian traditions and their various approaches to rituals, symbolization, beliefs, morality, and governance.
Offering to be determined.
REL 211 - Formerly 21 - Judeo-Christian Ethics (4)
An examination of different ethical theories and approaches in Judeo-Christian traditions. Examines special topics, such as marriage, divorce, romantic love, human sexuality, and friendship, from perspectives in traditional and contemporary Protestantism, Catholicism, and Judaism. Gives attention to certain topics in political thought, environmental, and medical ethics.
Offered fall semester.
REL 212 - Formerly 22 - Social Ethics (4)
An examination of various current and perennial problems in social morality. Topics included are natural law, the role of religion in the state, the morality of politics, economic justice, civil rights, civil liberties, gender issues, race issues, patriotism, capital punishment, warfare, ethics and business, and ethics and medicine.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH
REL 304 - Formerly 24 - Religion in America (4)
A historical approach to American religious developments. The goal is to understand religious dimensions of the pluralistic nature of society in the United States. Topics will vary by course offering but are likely to include a consideration of varieties of Christianity in the United States, including Puritanism, the Great Awakening, the Enlightenment, Revivalism, the rise of denominationalism, and the emergence of sects and cults. Topics may also include African-American religion, civil religion, the interactions among Protestants, Catholics, and Jews in American society, and Middle Eastern and Asian religions in America. Course may be repeated as topic changes.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
REL 234 - Formerly 25 - Introduction to Early Christianity (4)
This course traces the history of Christianity from the death of Jesus to the break up of the Roman empire (seventh century) and the rise of Islam. Important theological questions (such as: who is Jesus [Christology]; what does he do [soteriology]; the nature of God; why is there evil in the world [theodicy]) are considered and placed in the context of ancient Roman history and philosophy. These considerations help us to understand the meaning of Christian martyrdom, the effect of Constantine's conversion, the origins of Christian worship and sacred space (Constantine's St. Peter's Basilica in Rome and the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, in particular), ecclesiastical and clerical orders (bishops and priests, for example), monasticism, the doctrine of "original sin," and apocalyptic expectations. The appeal of alternate Christianities such as Gnosticism and Arianism and the decline of Classical religion are also considered. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
REL 235 - Formerly 26 - Intoduction to Medieval Christianity (4)
This course traces the history of Christianity from the break up of the Roman Empire to the reformations of the sixteenth century (Protestant and Catholic). Important topics include: the rise of the Papacy, the break with Byzantine Christianity, monasticism, sacred space, the medieval "discovery of the self," the mendicant orders (Franciscans and Dominicans), Eucharistic theology, the origins of the university, natural theology, late medieval mysticism, and the break up of Christendom in the sixteenth century. "Popular" religious practices, such as cults of the saints, miracles, and the unique artistic genius of the medieval cathedral are placed in a broader context. Fruitful Christian coexistence as well as violent conflict with Islam and Judaism are also considered, as are the multiplicity of "heretical" Christianities (including Catharism and Waldensians).
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years. Same as: HIST+26
REL 244 - Formerly 27 - Eastern Christianity I (4)
History of the four Ancient Patriarchates and the seven separated churches of the East until the time of the Roman Schism.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: CHST - Formerly CHIST+227
Fulfills: BH
REL 245 - Formerly 28 - Eastern Christianity II (4)
The Orthodox Church from the 11th century to the present; later history of the separated churches: the Uniates, Eastern dissenters, and Protestant Oriental communities.
Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: CHST - Formerly CHIST+228
REL 101 - Formerly 3 - Introduction to Religion (4)
An introduction to the study of religion through an examination of the world religions ofBuddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students are introduced to the historical method of analyzing the making of each tradition over time, and to the comparative method of analyzing patterns across traditions towards creating a globally accurate definition of religion. The course investigates the variety of ways in which each tradition establishes beliefs and values, and its mobilization ofthem in experiences and practices. Through field trips to sacred spaces currently used for worship of each tradition in the U.S. context, the course explores religion's connections with public space, community, and the arts.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT, DUS
REL 260 - Formerly 34 - Religion and Culture: India (4)
An introduction to the history, literature, and practices of the religions of India, with major focus on the foundational traditions ofVedism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and the later emergence of Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism. While providing an overview ofeach tradition, the course emphasizes the dynamic interactions among them that have shaped the development ofreligious and cultural traditions on the subcontinent and their civilizational significance. Primary texts in translation and visual materials are central to the course study.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 270 - Formerly 35 - Religion and Culture: China and Japan (4)
An introduction to the history, literature, and practices of the major religions of China and Japan, focusing on Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Shinto. While providing an overview of each tradition, the course emphasizes the dynamic interactions among them that have shaped the development of religious and cultural traditions in East Asia and their civilizational significance. Primary texts in translation and visual materials are central to the course study. The course includes field trips to Japanese traditional institutions devoted to the practice of Zen and the Tea Ceremony in New York City.
Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 250 - Formerly 36 - Introduction to Islam (4)
A broad introduction to the world's second largest religion. Topics covered include a brief historical overview of the life and mission of the Prophet Muhammad, the rise of the early Islamic community, and the formation of Islamic civilization. Additional units focus on the nature and structure of the Qur'an, the role of Islamic law, aspects of ritual practice, and expressions of Muslim spirituality. Relying heavily on primary textual sources in translation, students consider issues such as the relationship between religion and politics, women and society, and themes of unity and variety in the Islamic tradition.
Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 252 - Formerly 37 - Introduction to the Qur'an (4)
A thematic and historical investigation of the central document of Islamic revelation. Devotes special attention to understanding conceptions of God, humanity, nature, community, holy law, prophethood, history, eschatology, and cosmology as reflected in both the Qur'an and in early Muslim theology. Seeks to provide historical and contextual appreciation of the Qur'an in various aspects of Islamic thought and practice. Comparison with both the Jewish and Christian scriptural tradition is encouraged where appropriate.
Offering to be determined.
REL 248 - Formerly 38 - Contemporary American Catholicism (4)
An introduction to Roman Catholic life and thought as experienced in the United States, with emphasis upon the church's ongoing pursuit of aggiornamento (rethinking basic issues) in such areas as doctrine, ecclesial structures, and problems of the modern world. Focuses on the dialectic between institutional conformity and the American democratic ideal of personal freedom, between traditional consciousness and contemporary culture, between the dynamics of human existence and dogmatic and moral tenets.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
REL 377 - Formerly 39 - Studies in Comparative Mysticism (4)
An investigation of mysticism through a comparative and phenomoenological study of mystical traditions in five major world religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. Examines and compares primary texts, practices, major figures, and significant historical developments in mysticism within and among these five religions.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH, DIT, WI
REL 3A - Introduction of Religion (Off Campus Experience)
This course is the optional Off-Campus Experience component of REL+3; students who choose this option must concurrently enroll in REL+3. Enrollment in 3A is not required for enrollment in REL+3. Students enrolled in REL+3A will need to complete extra assignments in addition to the required assignments for REL+3. These extra assignments include: 1) Attending all five field trips, 2) returning for independent study to one of the houses of worship, 3) attending a special day-long field trip to museums in New York City, and 4) writing a minimum four page paper on these extra assigned experiences. These extra assignments are fully explained on the syllabus.
Corequisite: REL+3
Fulfills: OCE
REL 240 - Formerly 40 - Dante:Hell,Heaven & Florence (4)
This course considers one of the most influential authors in the Western world. We will take the entire spiritual journey from hell to heaven and of Dante's Divine Comedy and consider it in Dante's medieval intellectual, literary and political context. In addition to the Comedy, we read selections from Dante's On Monarchy and The New Life. Other primary texts include selections from Aquinas, Bonaventure, Guido Cavalcanti, Boccaccio's Life of Dante, and Dino Compagni's Chronicle of Florence, along with other contemporary chronicles as we examine medieval Florence and the intellectual background of the Comedy. This course is a seminar emphasizing class discussion and written research assignments of different lengths. This counts as an Italian "Language in Context" course. The course employs a student-generated "geographic database" as a research tool. This database of primary texts and images allows the students to rapidly immerse themselves in Dante's contemporary Florence and better understand how Dante used the particular details of his surroundings to build poetic image and metaphor.

Fulfills: BH, BI
REL 332 - Formerly 42 - The Reformation: Theology, Society, and Devotion (4)
This course begins by examining the origins of reformation in the history of Christianity. We then trace some of the key questions that become central to the fifteenth- and sixteenth- century reformers. Topics will include: the nature, language and availability of the Bible; papal power; devotional practices (prayer books, indulgences, and the Eucharist); and grace and free will. We shall examine the critiques of these practices and theologies by reformers such as Wycliffe, Hus, Erasmus, Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin. We shall also examine the Catholic reformation, the Council of Trent and the origins of Roman Catholicism. Other topics include the rise of the modern state, witchcraft, Inquisition, and women as reformers and objects of reform. The final portion of the course will focus on the English Reformation and work directly with Drew's 16th- and 17th- century collection of English prayer books in the Maser Collection. The course will have an examination, a short essay on on

Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 258 - Formerly 46 - The Sufi Path: Studies in Islamic Mysticism (4)
Mysticism has historically served as one of the three great paths to faith in the Islamic tradition. This course locates Islamic mysticism, or Sufism, within the larger context of Islamic spirituality. Explores the rich legacy of mysticism in Islam from its pre-Islamic roots through to the present. The primary approach to Sufism in this course is through examining the seminal texts of the great Sufi masters in translation.
Offering to be determined.
REL 256 - Formerly 47 - Religion and Politics: The Challenge of Islamic Revivalism (4)
An examination of modern currents in radical Islamic thought and political organization. This course focuses on the relation of religion to both political life and the various challenges of modernity. The course emphasizes the diversity of contemporary Islamic thought and contemporary radical Islamic political movements. The class also evaluates both the continuities and contrasts between classical and modern Islamic thought through the translated works of important radical Islamic thinkers. Offerings to be determined.
Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, DIT, WI
REL 254 - Formerly 48 - Religion and Society in Modern Egypt (4)
An interdisciplinary examination of the role and place of religion in modern Egyptian society. Examines issues such as the impact of religion on the family, on politics, on education, and on various aspects of contemporary Egyptian intellectual and cultural life. Employs literature and film, as well as historical, sociological, anthropological, political science, and religious studies approaches to the study of religion. Focuses on comparing and contrasting Muslim and Christian experiences.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
REL 292 - Formerly 50 - Comparative Religion (4)
An intermediate course in the study of Comparative Religion. This course introduces students to the comparative method in the study of religion through the consideration of a topical aspect of religion across Eastern and Western religions. Past topics have included pilgrimage, marriage in world religions, devotional literature in world religions.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years. Same as: HIST+52
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 201 - Formerly 52 - Intermediate Topics in Religion: U.S. (4)
This course examines topics in the study of religion at the intermediate level. The focus of this course will be on religions and their relevance within the United States. The course introduces students to the nature of religion as a defined area of human experience through beliefs, practices, and cultural identity. The course introduces students to methods such as phenomenological, thematic, historical, or comparative perspectives to analyze religious phenomena.
May be repeated as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
REL 295 - Formerly 55 - The Problem of Evil in World Religions (4)
This seminar offers a comparative examination of how Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism define evil and explain its existence in the world. Topics considered include why bad things happen to good people, why there is suffering in the world and, in traditions with a notion of a benevolent and all-knowing divinity, why the divinity allows evil and suffering to exist.

Fulfills: BH, DIT, WI
REL 296 - Formerly 56 - Cosmology in World Religions (4)
This seminar explores how five major world religions, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism, explain the origins and nature of the cosmos. Through classical texts in translation, students will compare how these five major religions understand how the universe came into existence, how it is ordered, what the purposes of the created universe are and how study of the cosmos reveals deeper understanding of the nature of ultimate sacred reality.

Fulfills: BH, DIT, WI
REL 264 - Formerly 60 - Topics in Asian Religions (4)
An in-depth study of a selected religious topic pertaining to South Asian, Southeast Asian, and East Asian cultures, considered either comparatively or specific to one of the cultures. Topics vary from year to year. Uses a variety of methodologies, including history, anthropology, art history, sociology and literature studies, on an interdisciplinary basis with the study of religion. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
REL 210 - Formerly 65 - Writing in the Discipline in the Study of Religion (2)
This two-credit course may be used to fulfill the Writing in the Major requirement in Religious Studies. It must be taken on a co-requisite basis with a four-credit course in the department. In REL+65, students analyze materials covered in the four-credit course in greater depth, especially through the focus of what specific challenges are involved in writing about religion in academic essays. In addition to writing assignments done in fulfillment of the four-credit course, in REL+65 students write short papers on methods and approaches to writing in religion, and revise essays assigned in the four-credit course to demonstrate knowledge of ways in which writing about religion shapes knowledge of religion.
Open only to students majoring in Religious Studies. Corequisite: any intermediate course in Religious Studies.
Fulfills: WM
REL 206 - Formerly 66 - Sociology of Religion (4)
An introduction to the sociology of religion. Discusses classical and contemporary theorists such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Wuthnow, Corbett, Bellah; explores the practical everyday world of religion; and analyzes the influence of cultural and social factors on religion. Organizing themes vary from year to year.
Offering to be determined. Same as: SOC+66
REL 294 - Formerly 67 - Comparative Fundamentalism (4)
An examination of the rise of religious fundamentalism in comparative perspective. Topics to be covered include the historical development of fundamentalism, the nature and organization of contemporary fundamentalism, the relationship between fundamentalism and the family, state, and education, and the significance of fundamentalism in domestic and international politics. Specific attention is given to case studies of the history and religious culture of fundamentalism in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, and comparisons between Western and Eastern religions, traditions will be made. The perspective of the course is sociological and theological, but the ethical and political issues and dilemmas raised by these groups will also be considered.
Offered fall semester. Same as: SOC+67
REL 238 - Formerly 71 - Crusade and Jihad Then and Now (4)
This course investigates and compares the relgious origins of the ideas of crusade and jihad. In both cases a devotional practice became militarized; we will discuss how these practices became militarized both theologically and practically. We consider the contested spaces of the Mediterranean, including Jerusalem, that fostered the delvelopment of these forms of religious warfare. We will then examine how these ideas became transformed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in movements and events as varied as romanticism, the Red Cross, colonialism, World War I, Pan-Arabism, and Wahhabism. All of these reimagined, idealized, and represented the medieval world (Latin or Arabic) so as to promote radically different agendas.
Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. Same as: HIST+71
Fulfills: BH, DIT
REL 239 - Formerly AA1 - Topics in Christian Culture (4)
This course examines particular issues in the study of Christianity from the vantage of cultural studies. Topics will vary but include theology, devotional and ritual practice, history, and art. Approaches will be drawn from across disciplines and include anthropological, art historical, historical and literary methods. Students will be examined on and write about both primary materials and secondary scholarship pertaining to the semesters topic.

Fulfills: BH, BI
REL 310 - Formerly AA2 - Independent Study for Writing (2-4)
This course is for students who seek to develop their writing in the Study of Religion by a self-designed research project undertaken with a full-time faculty member in the Religion department. The work in fulfillment of the course study involves discussion of the nature of and issues in writing in the discipline of Religion as relevant to the students project topic, and the project will result in a research paper.

Fulfills: BH, WM

RUSS

RUSS 101 - Formerly 1 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Russian (4)
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar with an emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension skills. Students will learn to read and write the Cyrillic alphabet, and begin the study of the Russian case system. Supplementary readings in Russian culture. Extensive use of Web based materials. Open to students with no prior knowledge of Russian or who have been assigned to the course after a placement examination.
Corequisite: RUSS+3. Offered fall semester.
RUSS 301 - Formerly 101 - Advanced Russian: Listening & Speaking Using Russian Media (4)
An advanced course for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Discussion of authentic cultural materials from Russian film, television, and radio, using webcasts, RuTube, podcasts and the Internet. Emphasis on listening comprehension and conversation. Review of selected topics in grammar and stylistics. Short oral reports and written assignments.
Prerequisite: RUSS+50 or placement exam Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: DIT
RUSS 302 - Formerly 102 - Advanced Reading and Writing in Russian: Non-fiction (4)
Reading and analysis of authentic texts in Russian. Material will consist of non-fictional texts focusing on political, historical, business or scientific topics, depending on student interest. Students will write, discuss and revise short essays in Russian, with attention to stylistics, word usage and idiomatic expressions.
Prerequisite: RUSS+50 or permission of the program coordinator. Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WI
RUSS 251 - Formerly 11 - Love and Death in Russian Literature (4)
Russian literature is renowned for its probing explorations of human relationships and the "eternal questions" of human existence. This course surveys Russian literature of the 19th and 20th centuries with an emphasis on the recurring pattern of strong heroines and superfluous heroes found in the works of such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and Bulgakov, as well as in selections from more recent Soviet and post-Soviet Russian writers.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
Fulfills: BH
RUSS 252 - Formerly 12 - Russian Writers (2)
The study of a particular Russian writer (Chekhov, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Nabokov and others ) or group of writers (Russian women writers, Russian emigre writers, Russian-Jewish writers, etc) within the context of the main issues in literature, history and society of their day. Readings are in English translation. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Course may be repeated. Offered Fall semester.
Fulfills: BH
RUSS 351 - Formerly 121 - Selected Topics in Russian Literature & Culture (2)
An in-depth study of a topic in Russian cultural studies or of a particular theme, genre or major work of Russian literature read in English translation (students with advanced language skills may opt to do readings in the original). Offerings may include such topics as the Russian short story, post-Soviet Literature, Russian plays, Slavic Folk Culture or Russian Art and Architecture.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester.
RUSS 352 - Formerly 125 - Special Topics in Russian Cultural Studies (4)
In-depth study of a particular topic relevant to Russian cultural studies but not covered by regular course offerings. Future topics may include: Slavic Folk Cultures; Eastern European Literature and Film; Russian Art and Architecture.
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Offered annually.
RUSS 350 - Formerly 135 - Banned Books: Russian Literature and Censorship (4)
A history of the development of Russian literature from the 18th century to the present focusing on the relationship between individual writers and state control of the arts in the Imperial, Soviet and post-Soviet periods. The course will examine publishing and censorship practices and trace the various ways in which Russian writers managed to communicate with their readers despite state controls. Readings include works by Radishchev, Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, Solzhenitsyn and other dissident writers. All readings in English translation. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
Offered Fall semester in even-number years.
Fulfills: BH
RUSS 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Russian (2-4)
A tutorial course designed to enable students to study areas not offered in other courses. Conducted in English (or Russian).
May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall and spring semesters.
RUSS 255 - Formerly 16 - Introduction to Russian and Soviet Cinema (4)
A chronological survey of developments in Russian film history from the pre-revolutionary era to the present. Students will be exposed to a wide range of movies, including early silent films (pre- and post-revolutionary), experimental films of the 1920s and early 1930s, socialist realist films, films on World War II and Soviet life, and films from the glasnost' era and contemporary Russia. There will be extensive screening of works such as October, The End of St. Petersburg, Jolly Fellows, The Ascent, Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears, and Little Vera. Readings will include theoretical articles and selections from Russian film history and criticism. All readings are in English and all films shown with English subtitles.
Offered alternate spring semesters.
Fulfills: BA
RUSS 101H - Formerly 1H - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Russian (4)
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar with an emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension skills. Students will learn to read and write the Cyrillic alphabet, and begin the study of the Russian case system. Supplementary readings in Russian culture. Extensive use of Web based materials. Students who have been placed in RUSS+1H in the Fall and RUSS+2H in the Spring are exempt from taking the co-curricular conversation courses, based on oral interviews during the placement period.
Offered fall semester.
RUSS 102 - Formerly 2 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Russian II (4)
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar with an emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. Students will complete the study of the Russian case system and learn word processing in Cyrillic. Supplementary materials on Russian culture, including songs and poetry. Extensive use of Web-based materials.
Prerequisite: RUSS+1 or placement exam RUSS+1 and 3. Corequisite: RUSS+4. Offered spring semester.
RUSS 250 - Formerly 25 - An Intro. to Russian, Eastern European, & Eurasian Cultures (4)
This course examines the successive states and communities which have inhabited the space between Central Europe and East Asia, including Kievan Rus', Muscovy, the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union and the current Russian Federation and new neighboring states. We look at questions of ethnicity, religious pluralism, and regional diversity as well as economic and social issues, such as the role of women in society, the changes in class system and the legacy of the serf system. We will study the history and culture of this region through lectures, discussions and readings, using primary historical texts and works of literature and art, including film, music, painting and architecture. We will also pay special attention to what is being written about Russia (on all issues) on the internet today-and how Russian is being written about and portrayed in contemporary media practices.
Offered alternate spring semesters.
Fulfills: BI, DIT
RUSS 102H - Formerly 2H - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Russian II (4)
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar with an emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. Students will complete the study of the Russian case system and learn word processing in Cyrillic. Supplementary materials on Russian culture, including songs and poetry. Extensive use of Web-based materials. Students who have been placed in RUSS+1H in the Fall and RUSS+2H in the Spring are exempt from taking the co-curricular conversation courses, based on oral interviews during the placement period.
Offered spring semester.
RUSS 103 - Formerly 3 - Basic Russian Conversation I (2)
This two-credit course allows students enrolled in Russian 1 to work on Russian phonetics, pronunciation and intonation. Emphasis on development of conversational skills and listening comprehension.
Corequisite: RUSS+1. Offered fall semester.
RUSS 201 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Russian I (4)
Development of communicative ability in contemporary written and spoken Russian. Review of basic Russian grammar and development of reading skills through expanded study of the verbal system. Use of authentic materials and cultural supplements as well as Web-based materials. Open to students who have completed one year of college Russian or have been assigned to the course after placement examination.
Prerequisite: RUSS+2 and RUSS+4 Offered fall semester.
RUSS 104 - Formerly 4 - Basic Russian Conversation II (2)
This two credit course allows students enrolled in Russian 2 additional practice in developing conversational and listening comprehension skills.
Only students simultaneously registered in RUSS 102 - Formerly 2 - . Meets: Two 60 minute periods per week. Prerequisite: RUSS+1 and 3. Corequisite: RUSS+2. Offered spring semester.
RUSS 202 - Formerly 50 - Intermediate Russian II (4)
Completion of study of basic Russian grammar. Further development of communicative ability in contemporary written and spoken Russian. Use of film and video materials, cultural supplements as well as Web-based materials.
Prerequisite: RUSS+30. Offered spring semester.
RUSS 299 - Formerly 99 - Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum (1-2)
Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: RUSS+30

SOC

SOC 101 - Formerly 1 - Introduction to Sociology (4)
A prerequisite to all other courses in sociology. An in-depth analysis of the ways in which sociologists view the world. Topics include deviance, the family, the economy, gender, inequality, politics, race and ethnicity, socialization, and social change.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BSS
SOC 304 - Formerly 104 - Sociology of Immigration (4)
A sociological and historical study of the issues surrounding immigration. The first section of the class looks at the macro side of immigration: some basic history of immigration waves to the U.S., causes and patterns of immigration, and issues such as immigrants in labor markets, economic and academic assimilation, immigrant crime, and the politics surrounding immigration both in the U.S. and abroad. The second section explores the micro side: the personal experience of immigration, immigrant identity, alienation, cultural assimilation, and acculturative stress.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 303 - Formerly 105 - Social Change (4)
A sociological, historical, and cross-cultural examination of social change. Covers theories of change and explores its many forms. Topics include the relationships of ideology and consciousness, technology, and demography to social change, and the making of societal change through social movements and revolutions. Examines change in both industrialized and Third World nations. Focuses on change in gender systems and the efforts of a variety of marginalized groups to transform the status quo.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
Fulfills: WI
SOC 302 - Formerly 106 - Urban Sociology (4)
A sociological and historical examination of the city as a geographical, cultural, economic and political entity. Investigates processes of urbanization, suburbanization and globalization as forces shaping the current organization of social life. Topics covered include stratification, urban politics, international urbanization and social change.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered in alternate years. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+106
SOC 307 - Formerly 107 - Criminology (4)
An analysis of the sociological aspects of crime with particular attention to the theoretical definition and the statistical incidence of criminal behavior in the United States. Focuses on major sociological theories of crime, the analysis of homicide, and sociohistorical attempts to control crime and rehabilitate criminals.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or equivalent Offered annually.
SOC 308 - Formerly 108 - Sociology of Population (4)
An introductory examination of the social study of population. Topics include current concern about population expansion; history of global demographic increases and decreases; examination of important demographic theories, particularly those of Malthus and Marx; analysis of the major demographic variables of fertility, mortality, and migration.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
SOC 309 - Formerly 110 - Sociology of Mass Communications (4)
An overview of how the mass media and American cultural, political and economic institutions mutually affect each other. Systems of mass communication examined include books, the Internet, magazines, movies, newspapers, and television. Two topics to be emphasized are: 1) the production, control, and consumption of various forms of information in the mass media; 2) comparative analyses of the uses of mass media in different countries.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered fall semester. Same as: BKHS - Formerly BKHIS+810
SOC 311 - Formerly 111 - Sociology of Health and Illness (4)
A survey of the important themes involved in the sociological analysis of health problems and their treatment. Topics include different health care systems, doctor-patient relationships, professional socialization, other health care providers, epidemiology, and the social-psychological aspects of medical technology.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permissions of the instructor. Offered spring semester.
SOC 314 - Formerly 114 - Engendering Prison (4)
This course engages students in a critical analysis of the causes and consequences of the recent growth in the prison-industrial complex in the United States. We will use readings, assignments and lectures to explore the role of social systems of stratification (particularly race, class, and gender) in shaping the U.S. prison industry. One of the most valuable resources we will have to explore these issues is our partnership with a local prison. The course will use readings, lectures, assignments and class discussions to explore the following themes: the rise of mass incarceration in the U.S.; gendered pathways to prison; gendered experiences of incarceration; gendered risks of entry.
Enrollment priority: Priority given to sociology majors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of the instructor. Offered Annually.
SOC 315 - Formerly 115 - Political Sociology (4)
A presentation of the main themes and the dominant theoretical perspectives involved in the study of political processes and political institutions. Topics include politics, elections, nation building, national elites and public policy making, parties, and social movements.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+115
SOC 316 - Formerly 116 - Sociology of National Development (4)
Seeks the understanding of socioeconomic and political changes in the contemporary societies from a historical and comparative perspective. Deals with two major issues: The development of wealthy nations and the underdevelopment of poor nations. Covers the major theories of development, e.g., modernization, dependency, and world-system theories, as well as discussions of empirical issues, e.g., starvation, illiteracy, the destruction of the environment. Addresses topics such as peasant revolts, revolutions, liberation movements, alternative paths to national development (e.g. socialism, capitalism) and how these events, social processes, and alternatives affect the domestic situation of each society and the international community.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+116
SOC 317 - Formerly 117 - The Sociology of Management (4)
A presentation of the main themes involved in the management of corporations and other business organizations. The themes examined are communication, decision making, innovation, leadership, strategy, and politics.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
SOC 318 - Formerly 118 - Sociology of Education (4)
An analysis of the institutionalized ways of educating and training people in the United States. Emphasizes the functions of education for maintaining and/or changing the social structure. Examines the purposes and needs of the intellectual community.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
SOC 320 - Formerly 120 - Sociology of Mental Health and Illness (4)
This course will provide an overview of the ways in which a sociological perspective informs our understanding of mental health and illness and will cover the historical, social, and cultural contexts encompassing the experience of mental illness. This course emphasizes social, rather than the biological or medical, factors in order to gain a better understanding of the meaning and precursors of mental illness, paying particular attention to the ways in which these processes differ across social groups. We will discuss how mental illness is defined and how those definitions are applied to different people. In addition, we will examine how persons with mental illness are cared for and how "care" has changed over time.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor. Offered annually.
SOC 323 - Formerly 123 - Supervised Sociological Field Study (4)
An overview of the main components of qualitative research in sociology with particular emphasis placed on participant observation methodology. Students are required to observe human behavior in a field setting (e.g., community agency, factory, hospital, corporation, day care center) and to execute a research project using a theoretical framework and observational methodology. Tutorial conferences with the instructor are required as well as weekly seminar meetings.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SOC+1 Offered spring semester.
SOC 325 - Formerly 125 - Classical Sociological Theory (4)
An examination of classical sociological theory, including the works of such theorists as Addams, DuBois, Durkheim, Martineau, Marx, Simmel, and Weber. Objectives include (1) assessment of how social and intellectual forces influenced the development of these theories; (2) examination of the construction and testing of specific theories; and (3) demonstration of how classical theory has contributed to the development of contemporary sociological theory.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 Offered fall semester. Same as: HIST - Formerly HIST - Formerly HISTG+125. Same as: HIST - Formerly HIST - Formerly HISTG+125.
SOC 326 - Formerly 126 - Contemporary Sociological Theory (4)
An examination of theory building and testing in contemporary sociology. The course is divided into two parts. The first part examines the general principles, procedures, and criteria used in the construction and the testing of contemporary sociological theories. The second part systematically assesses how various contemporary theories such as conflict, exchange, feminist theory, functionalism, neo-Marxist theory, postmodern theories, and symbolic interactionism have been constructed and tested.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester in alternate years. Same as: HIST - Formerly HISTG+127
SOC 400 - Formerly 129 - Senior Seminar in Sociology (4)
A research seminar in sociological theory and methods. Students formulate a research project combining theory and methods for presentation to the seminar. Students meet in seminar and tutorial sessions.
[CAP] Capstone Open only to senior sociology majors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SOC+1 Offered spring semester.
SOC 330 - Formerly 130 - Theories of Collective Action and Social Movements (4)
An introduction to the study of collective action from different theoretical and methodological perspectives. Theories reviewed include mass society, resource mobilization, and new social movements' theories to examine different episodes of collective action, such as European food riots, American race riots, Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre in France, the American civil rights movement, Latin America populism, and the Semana Tragica in Barcelona. Students are required to work on team projects to analyze a social movement or other forms of collective action.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
SOC 290 - Formerly 131 - Contemporary Issues in Sociology (4)
An examination of contemporary issues and topics in sociology. The particular issue or topic changes from time to time.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
SOC 201 - Formerly 15 - Contemporary Social Problems (4)
An examination of contemporary social problems for their effect on American society. Considers proposed solutions to various social problems. The specific topics studied change to reflect contemporary American concerns. Such topics as aging, civil rights, crime, drug addiction, environmental pollution, mental illness, and poverty may be explored.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
SOC 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Sociology (2-4)
A tutorial course. Independent investigation of a sociological topic, chosen in consultation with a member of the sociology faculty. Regular meetings by arrangement with the instructor. Course may be repeated.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SOC+1 Offered every semester.
SOC 385 - Formerly 163 - Independent Research/ Off-Campus Programs (4)
Independent investigation of a sociological topic relating to an off-campus/study abroad program. The research proposal and the final paper must be read and approved by a member of the sociology faculty.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 Offered every semester.
SOC 388 - Formerly 185 - European Research Seminar (4)
Each student designs and conducts an independent research project on a topic selected in consultation with the Resident Director of the European Semester and approved by the appropriate departmental liaison. The project will stress library research, as well as personal interviews, and may include trips to appropriate EU member states. (Students may also register as an independent study in any approved major)
Same as: SOC+163 Offered fall semester.
SOC 202 - Formerly 19 - Sociology of Inequality (4)
An analysis of the social and psychological causes, manifestations, and consequences of inequality. Examines class, gender, race and ethnicity, and age inequalities, with a focus on the United States.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered spring semester.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 210 - Formerly 21 - Sociological Research Methods (4)
An overview of sociological research techniques, including the basic problems of measurement, construction, and testing of hypotheses; the application of statistical techniques in sociology; and the use of the computer in sociological research. Credit may be received for only one of the following: SOC+121, BHVR+121, or PSYC+102. Prerequisite: SOC+1 and MATH+3. Offered fall semester.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 and MATH+3 Offered every semester.
Fulfills: Q, WM
SOC 225 - Formerly 25 - Sociology of Gender (4)
An analysis of contemporary gender roles from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Focuses on the social construction of gender and how gender affects our most intimate relationships. An examination of the implications of gender stratification for family and workplace. Explores historical and cross-cultural variations in gender roles, as well as variations by race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 226 - Formerly 26 - Sociology of Race and Ethnicity (4)
Focuses on an analysis of race and ethnicity as social constructions. An examination of the creation of race and ethnic categories and process of social stratification based on these categories. Explores the historical, economic and political processes that shape our understanding of race and ethnicity in the U.S. and abroad.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 227 - Formerly 27 - Sociology of Families (4)
An analysis of theoretical approaches to the study of the family with an emphasis on changing gender roles. Focuses on diversity among families and how definitions of "the family" are changing to incorporate variations in family structure by social class, ethnic and racial background, and sexual orientation. Topics include dating, love and romance, cohabitation, marriage and divorce, single-parent families, remarriage, day care, and violence in intimate family relationships.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offered annually.
SOC 229 - Formerly 29 - The Sociology of Aging (4)
A study of the key concepts, main theoretical perspectives, and important substantive issues of the sociology of aging. One of the central issues explored is gender differences in aging. Other issues include stereotypes, the social construction of life cycles, changes in relationships over the life course, eldercare, and work and retirement. Examines historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and social class.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or equivalent Offered Annually.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 234 - Formerly 34 - Introduction to Social Welfare (4)
A sociological introduction to the institution of social welfare, using the theory and the methodology of sociology to analyze the role of social welfare in modern industrial society. Focuses on the historical development and the institutionalization of social welfare; contradictions between the ideal of social welfare and the manner in which it becomes actualized; and the relationships between social welfare and political, economic, and religious institutions. Uses sociological analysis in the study of specific social welfare institutions and agencies.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
SOC 253 - Formerly 40 - The Individual in Society (4)
A sociological examination of the self and the interrelationships between individuals and society. Covers perspectives from sociological social psychology on the ways in which societal position affects an individuals sense of self, how individuals interact with others in different types of relationships, and how other people influence the thoughts and feelings of individuals.
Prerequisite: SOC+1
SOC 242 - Formerly 42 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior (4)
An analysis of different theoretical approaches to the study of deviance and their application to a variety of topic areas (e.g., juvenile delinquency, prostitution, white-collar crime, and violence against women). Special focus on gender, labeling, and stigma.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor. Offerred Annually.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 249 - Formerly 49 - Sociology of Work (4)
A sociological examination of the varieties of work and the ways in which the changing nature of work affects the well-being of the workers. Topics include different types of jobs, occupations and professions, low-wage work and poverty, worker health and safety, work and family, race, class and gender in the workplace, and collectives' responses to work.
Prerequisite: SOC+1. Offered annually.
SOC 250 - Formerly 50 - Sociology of Childhood and Youth (4)
An interdisciplinary approach is used to explore transformations in the cultural and emotional meanings of childhood. This course focuses on the development of institutions that serve their needs. It analyzes the disjunction between the social construction of childhood/youth and the lived experience. It examines how inequalities among children and youth vary based on class, gender, race, region, country, and their role as workers or consumers. The course also analyzes the political and economic commonalities among youth and children that relegate them to a separate and frequently segregated sphere of social life.
Prerequisite: SOC+1 or permission of instructor. Offered annually.
Fulfills: DUS
SOC 251 - Formerly 51 - Happiness in Contemporary Society (4)
An interdisciplinary course covering the scientific research on happiness. The course examines the impact of demographic factors, media, work and leisure, government policies, social ties, and personal characteristics on happiness. It has an experiential component; students will do some of the "happiness exercises" which have been developed and tested by scholars doing research in this area.
Offering to be determined. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+351
SOC 252 - Formerly 52 - Garbage:Sociological Studies of Trash (2)
Garbage is the other side of culture. In this course we consider some of the historical, cultural, sociological, and political aspects of garbage, waste, refuse, and dirt. Our garbage and our waste can be considered a mirror in which our actions and our values are reflected back to us. Students will look through sociology at a number of controversies and debates about what trash is, what we do with it, and how we suffer from it. Thinking critically about trash will bring us up against many of the most pressing social and environmental issues human beings face today.
Prerequisite: SOC+1. Offering to be determined.
SOC 206 - Formerly 66 - Sociology of Religion (4)
An introduction to the sociology of religion. Discusses classical and contemporary theorists such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Wuthnow, Corbett, Bellah; explores the practical everyday world of religion; and analyzes the influence of cultural and social factors on religion. Organizing themes vary from year to year.
Offering to be Determined. Same as: REL+66
SOC 294 - Formerly 67 - Comparative Fundamentalism (4)
An examination of the rise of religious fundamentalism in comparative perspective. Topics to be covered include the historical development of fundamentalism, the nature and organization of contemporary fundamentalism, the relationship between fundamentalism and the family, state, and education, and significance of fundamentalism in domestic and international politics. Specific attention is given to case studies of the history and religious culture of fundamentalism in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, and comparisons between Western and Eastern religious traditions will be made. The perspective of the course is sociological and the theological, but the ethical and political issues and dilemmas raised by these groups will also be considered.
Offered fall semester. Same as: REL+67

SPAN

SPAN 181 - Formerly 1 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Spanish I (4)
An introduction to the language and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing using a communicative, proficiency-oriented approach. Interactive practice is enhanced by multimedia/technology. Designed for students who have not taken Spanish before. Twenty-five percent of the course done outside class using various technologies.
Offered every semester.
SPAN 301 - Formerly 102 - Spanish Grammar (4)
This course is designed to improve the student's accuracy and control of advanced grammatical modes in Spanish resulting in more precise articulation of ideas and opinions and other forms of self-expression. Class will emphasize proportionately the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening while using the most contemporary source materials such as magazines, reports, and films in Spanish. In addition, class will use internet sources and other technologies. Activities may include debates, speeches, interviews, reports, conversations, and dramatic skits.
Prerequisite: SPAN+30 Offered fall semester in even numbered years.
SPAN 303 - Formerly 104 - Spanish Grammar & Conversation for Heritage Learners (4)
Designed to develop reading and writing skills and improve linguistic proficiency of heritage speakers of Spanish. Stress on grammar control and expository writing, as well as implications of bicultural identity and recognition of regional linguistic variations.
Offered spring semesters in odd years.
SPAN 306 - Formerly 105C - Spanish Conversation (4)
The course focuses on developing students' conversational skills in Spanish through an emphasis on the use of spoken language within the contexts of Hispanic media and theater. Text-, audio-, and visual-based authentic materials as well as selected dramatic pieces in Spanish will provide the basis for oral discussion and exercises centered on improving pronunciation, developing an active vocabulary for use across different communicative contexts, and increasing the integration of all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing)
Prerequisite: SPAN+102, placement or special permission.
Fulfills: DIT
SPAN 308 - Formerly 107 - Spanish Composition (4)
This course provides a grammar review with special attention to the development of accurate oral and written expression. The objective of this course is to improve written proficiency. Emphasis on acquiring expressive vocabulary and knowing the rhetorical norms of different writing styles: academic writing, formal and informal correspondence, creative, argumentative, etc. Through daily written assignments, including exercises in translation, students should increase control of writing across various contexts.

Fulfills: WI
SPAN 352 - Formerly 113 - African Roots in Latin American Cultures (4)
A study of the many contributions that African Diaspora added to the richness of the present-day cultures of Latin America, Brazil and the Spanish Caribbean. The course will emphasize the influences that the African cultures have had in areas such as the language, economy, religion, music, art, dance and gastronomy. In addition to literary selections, readings in socio-historical sources, films and other art forms will be introduced and discussed.
Enrollment priority: Given to Spanish majors/minors, Latin American Studies minors, Pan African majors/minors. Offered in alternate years.
SPAN 351 - Formerly 115 - Magical Realism to Glblization Span-American Lit & Film (4)
A study of the major developments in Latin American literature and film in the past half century. First we concentrate on the literary aesthetics of the "Boom" - the movement that propelled Latin American literature into world recognition - and will consider theoretically the use of magical realism through close readings of representative canonical works. The second half of the course will center on the most recent prose and film of new generations of artists (such as the "McOndo" and "Crack Generation" movements, among others) depicting the impact of globalization, transnational forces, consumerism, migrations, and external influences upon Latin American identity. Taught in English.
Offered spring 2009.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 250 - Formerly 116 - Special Topics: Lat. Amer., Peninsular or Transatl. Cont. (4)
A study of a topic or topics in the linguistics, literature, or culture of the Spanish-speaking world outside of the United States not covered by the current offerings of the Spanish Department. The course may focus on one or more countries/groups/regions within the Spanish-speaking world outside of the United States; explore identity, national, collective or regional representations across an array of social categories as articulated in the production of one or more of these countries/groups/regions; or it may examine the linguistic, literary, or cultural production resulting from institutional, traditional or social entities/movements within the international Spanish-speaking world. In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits. Amount of credit established at time of registration.
Taught in English. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 380 - Formerly 117 - Selected Topics in Spanish (2-4)
A study of a topic or topics in a linguistic, cultural, or literary aspect of the Hispanic world not covered by the current offerings of the Spanish department. In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes.
In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Offered fall or spring semester.
SPAN 381 - Formerly 118 - Selected Topics in Spanish Literature and Cultural Stds. (2-4)
The study of a topic or topics related to a literary or cultural aspect of the Hispanic world not covered by the current offerings of the Spanish department. In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits.
In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Gateway course or special permission. Offered fall or spring semester.
SPAN 251 - Formerly 119 - Selected Topics:U.S.& U.S.Reg. Contexts(Taught in English) (4)
A study of a topic or topics in the linguistics, literature, or culture of the Latin and/or Latino/a communities of the United States not covered by the current offerings of the Spanish Department. The course may focus on one or more Hispanic groups/regions within the United States and its outposts, such as Mexican-Americas, Cuban-Americans, and Puerto Ricans; explore identity, national, collective or regional representations across an array of social categories as articulated in the production of one or more of these groups/regions; or it may examine the linguistic, literary, or cultural production of these groups/regions resulting from institutional, traditional or social entities/movements within the United States.
In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Taught in English. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
SPAN 310 - Formerly 120 - Gateway to Hispanic Literature and Cultural Studies (4)
This course introduces students to the basic critical skills for literary and cultural analysis, develops reading fluency across genres (such as poetry, prose, and theatre) and literary periods, and examines interdisciplinary cultural discourses as connected to a topic or topics related to the Hispanic world. Representative works and products studied are placed within their historical, cultural and theoretical contexts. The course pays particular attention to the development of oral and written argumentation across cultural frameworks and perspectives. Emphasis is placed on oral interpretations and presentations, critical oral and written responses, as well as on the original application of critical methodologies in written work. Students will develop writing and research skills pertinent to future coursework in the discipline. Topics may rotate among the following: Gender and Representation in Hispanic Literatures and Film; Spain, Latin America, the U.S.: An Odyssey of Cultures; Short Fictions in the Spanish Speaking World; The Hispanic Imagination: Poetry and Narrative; Identity, Performance and Self-Representation in Spanish-Speaking Cultures; The Hispanic Novella Tradition from Cervantes to Garcia Marquez.
Prerequisite: Three courses from the advanced intermediate sequence or special permission.
Fulfills: BH, WM
SPAN 366 - Formerly 121 - Advanced Expression and Stylistics (4)
An advanced course in creative writing. Based on the practices of creative writing in different genres and subgenres, translations, and oral production, students will refine their linguistic skills and work towards acquiring a personal style across written contexts. Students will also work toward the development of critical thinking skills when creating new texts. Prerequisite: Gateway course or concurrent registration with Gateway course or special permission.

Fulfills: BA
SPAN 363 - Formerly 122 - History of the Spanish Language (4)
An advanced study of the Spanish language examining its history and development from Latin to the phonological and syntactic descriptions found in present-day usage. Topics include comparative data on Spanish-American and peninsular Spanish, dialectology, sociolinguistics, and idiomatic usage. Linguistic study as applied to literature and pedagogical implications is explored.
Prerequisite: Gateway course or concurrent registration with Gateway course or special permission.
Fulfills: BH
SPAN 364 - Formerly 123 - Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (4)
This survey course introduces the primary fields of Spanish linguistics including: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics. We will examine the terminology and theoretical frameworks used in each field for the analysis of the Spanish language. Students will put linguistic theory to practice through the completion of exercises and the analysis of speech and text. We will also examine the social contexts that structure the use of language and its speakers by exploring the Spanish language in various settings around the world.
Prerequisite: Gateway course, or concurrent registration with Gateway course or special permission.
Fulfills: BSS
SPAN 365 - Formerly 124 - Spanish Sociolinguistics (4)
This course will familiarize students with issues of language use in context in Spanish-speaking communities around the world. Students will learn the field's main findings and methods for sociolinguistic analysis. They will become familiar with concepts such as linguistic variation, linguistic change, standard vs. non-prestigious varieties, bilingualism, diglossia, language attitudes, language planning, and conversation analysis.
Prerequisite: Gateway course, or concurrent registration with Gateway course or by special permission.
Fulfills: BSS, WI, DIT
SPAN 379 - Formerly 125 - Doing Business in the Hispanic World (4)
This course is designed to give students of Spanish a foundation in business vocabulary, basic business and cultural concepts as well as an in-depth reflection of what it means to do business in a variety of culturally diverse Hispanic countries. This perspective is conducted through literary readings, contemporary and historical comparisons, mass media analysis, and linguistic descriptions of products or brand names.
Enrollment priority: Priority to students who have already taken a course in the advanced language sequence and are considering a minor in Business, Society, and Culture or major in Economics and to students in the Latin American Studies program. Offered spring semester in even numbered years. Same as: MLIT+338
SPAN 382 - Formerly 128 - Selected Topics in Spanish Language and Linguistics (2-4)
The study of a topic or topics in Spanish language and linguistics not covered by the current offerings of the Spanish department. In any given semester the course may be offered as a single four-credit unit or divided into two separate topics, each carrying two credits.
Amount of credit established at the time of registration. Offered in Spanish. Maybe repeated for credit as topics changes. Prerequisite: Required courses from the Advanced Intermediate Language Sequence, placement or special permission.
SPAN 322 - Formerly 131 - Community Based Learning: The U.S. Latino/a Experience (4)
This course will combine the practice of translation across disciplines and community service through its dual focus on critical, reflexive thinking and civic responsibility. Through translations related to health, social, business and political issues, students increase their working vocabulary paying close attention to idioms, dialect and creativity. This will be complemented by an off-campus component. Students will partner with organizations that serve the local Latino/a community, and will examine their role and responsibility in relation to issues of citizenship, social and economic justice, and social change.
Prerequisite: Gateway course, or concurrent registration with Gateway course, or special permission.
Fulfills: DUS
SPAN 353 - Formerly 133 - Latinos in the US: Images of Self and Family (4)
This course will focus on visual and textual representations of Latinos, representing the individual and the family, both by the hegemonic media and by members of these communities. We will follow a multidisciplinary approach as we trace the development of Latinos in Hollywood cinema, television, re-construct representations in newspapers and the general media and place them in historical context. We will engage these texts in a dialogue with contestatory and revisionist representations in film, literature, and other popular forms from within the community.
Taught in English. Check department listings.
SPAN 333 - Formerly 136 - Colonial/Postcolonial Encounte rs: Europe, Africa and the Am ericas (4)
This course focuses on the interdisciplinary aspects of literatures and texts that represent colonial, neo-colonial and post-colonial encounters (Columbus and "cannibals"; Malinche and Cortez; Pocahontas and John Smith; Prspero and Calibn; contemporary migrants and the immigration officials at the sea and land borders of the USA or Spain). Our task will be to discuss the notions of power and powerlessness, center and periphery, purity and hybridism, First and Third World, cultural identity and globalization that may be present in these encounters.
Prerequisite: Gateway course or permission of the instructor. Offered fall 2008. Same as: MAT+882
Fulfills: BH
SPAN 312 - Formerly 137 - Love, Sex, and Spirituality in Early Modern Spain (4)
This course addresses the theme of love, both human and divine, as expressed in Spanish poetry, narrative, and drama from the late 15th to the early 17th centuries. Discussions of literary selections will address each work in its specific historical contexts during the early modern period, while also addressing the theories of love that inform these works. We will pay particular attention to the diverse modalities of amorous representations, both earthly and spiritual, as well as the roles of women as writers and characters. Prerequisite: SPAN+120 or special permission
Offered fall 2007.
Fulfills: WI
SPAN 339 - Formerly 139 - War and Imagination: The Spanish Civil War (4)
The defining event of 20th-century Spain and a prelude to Europe's Second World War, the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) captured world attention and the imagination of writers, artists, and workers. This course explores historical events that brought about the proclamation of the liberal Second Republic and the ensuing civil war resulting in long-endured Fascist repression of Francisco Franco and the anti-Francoist guerrilla movement. This course also explores de role of the American Abraham Lincoln Brigade in its fight against fascism during and after the Spanish Civil war. Ideological and social change (women, minorities, and language communities) are also investigated. This course also analyses artistic production (literature, art, film, and music) in Spain and US (Hollywood) that shows the rhetoric of war and propaganda.
Prerequisite: Gateway course, or concurrent registration with a Gateway course, or special permission. Offering to be Determined.
Fulfills: DIT
SPAN 326 - Formerly 140 - Self Place & The Environment in the Hispanic World (4)
Description Pending.

Fulfills: DIT, WI
SPAN 149 - Hispanic Cultures in the United States (4)
This course traces Hispanic cultural presence in North America through three key historical moments. Starting with Spain's colonial expansion and cultural imprint on what today is the U.S., the course then focuses on the migrations and political exiles of the 20th century, the civil rights movement, contestatory writing and the rise of ethnic literatures and films in both Spanish and English. Lastly, the course views recent works by first- or second-generation authors who write in English, but occupy a space of enunciation that is neither Hispanic nor Anglo, but fluid, hybrid, and multicultural.
Offered spring 2008.
Fulfills: BH, DUS
SPAN 331 - Formerly 154 - Reading Nation, Gender and Ethnicity in LatIn American Culture (4)
A multidisciplinary study of the discourses of gender and ethnicity during shifting moments of nation construction in Latin America after independence, revolution and modernization projects. Discourse analysis, gender and postcolonial theories will be applied to selected literary text as well as to films, art movements, political manifestos, and national myths. Prerequisite: Gateway course or permission of the instructor.
Enrollment priority: Priority to Spanish majors and minors and Latin American minors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors who have taken at least one advanced course in literature. Offered in alternate years.
Fulfills: DIT
SPAN 200 - Formerly 160 - Spanish Internship (2-4)
An internship where the student utilize Spanish skills hands-on. Internship should be approved before hand by the department. A final report is required.
Prerequisite: Gateway course, SPAN+120.
SPAN 300 - Formerly 161 - Independent Studies in Spanish (2-4)
An opportunity for the Spanish major/minor to engage in independent investigation of significant cultural, linguistic, literary, or philosophical questions relative to the student's field of interest. Students involved in concurrent study of related topic(s) meet regularly in conference groups.
Course may be repeated. Offered each semester.
SPAN 252 - Formerly 162 - The Culture of Melodrama (4)
This course addresses the origins, impact, and currency of the melodramatic across Spanish and Latin American culture, literature, film, music, and television. The course examines the recourse of the melodramatic within diverse emotional contexts (romantic, erotic, familial) and their relationship with varying cultural and social attitudes. The course will pay particular attention to the repetitions and excesses of melodramatic representations, and their implicit and explicit connections to gender, gender performance, sexual identity, and nationalism.
Taught in English.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 325 - Formerly 163 - Young Writers,Neo-Real.& Urb. Culture in the Hisp.World (4)
This course examines representative cultural production from a wave of young writers, filmmakers, and artists who have opted for a neo-realist aesthetic to represent current national and transnational realities. Focusing on movements like the Generacin X group in Spain and the McOndo and Crack groups in Latin America, the course explores the connections between this new production and urban identities. We pay special attention to the role of U.S. influences, audio-visual media, violence, disease, emerging marginalities, and rearticulated sexualities as elements of this new urban reality.

Fulfills: WI, DIT
SPAN 253 - Formerly 164 - Gender, Sexuality and Performance in Spanish Theatre (4)
This course is designed to offer an overview of Spanish theatre through representative works from the seventeenth century Golden Age to the early 20th century. Through an analysis of different dramatic genres the course explores the background and the historical, social and aesthetic development of the Spanish theatre, as well as its principal themes. We pay particular attention to these plays not just as literary artifacts, but also as texts for performance. In particular, we examine gender and sexuality both in performance and as performance - analyzing the meanings produced by gendered and sexualized bodies on stage and in audiences, as well as the constructions and manifestations of gender and sexuality through performance itself across different contexts and time periods. We analyze selected plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Fernndez de Moratn, and Garca Lorca, among others.
Taught in English.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 313 - Formerly 165 - Relationships,Marriage,and Romance in Hisp.Lit.and Film (4)
After providing a historical foundation, through representative texts and films this course traces the evolution of courtship and affective and institutional relationships, from the Golden Age to contemporary settings in the Hispanic world. Works studied are placed within their historical and theoretical contexts, in terms of public and private spaces, as well as power and dependency. We also consider the erosion of traditional values and mores as modern Hispanic culture has become more liberal and homogenized in industrial, globalized and media-saturated environments.
Taught in Spanish Prerequisite: Spanish 120, placement, or permission of instructor.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 354 - Formerly 166 - Gender in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction and Film (4)
This course provides a broad understanding of how gender and sexuality are articulated in fiction, film and other images in the Spanish-speaking world today. We approach these texts using multidisciplinary approaches, and examine their intersection with race, class and Hispanic cultural values and traditions. It will be organized thematically and by region to better understand the diversity of the Hispanic world. Using recent theoretical approaches (feminist, post-feminist, queer), we will study various gender representations (male, female, performative) as we elaborate on issues of authorship, representation and reception.
Taught in English.
Fulfills: BH, DIT
SPAN 332 - Formerly 167 - Hisp.Cultures in U.S.:Colonial Spain, Ethics, Post-Ethics (4)
This course traces Hispanic cultural presence in North America through three key historical moments. Starting with Spain's colonial expansion and cultural imprint in North America, followed by the 1848 transition of these territories to the U.S. and resulting cultural production, the course then focuses on the migrations and political exiles of the late 19th and the 20th century, the civil rights movement, contestatory writing and the rise of ethnic literatures and films in both Spanish and English. Lastly, the course views recent works by first- or second-generation authors who write in English, but occupy a space of enunciation that is neither Hispanic nor Anglo, but fluid, hybrid, and multicultural.
Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 120, placement, or permission of instructor.
SPAN 345 - Formerly 168 - Cinematic Language:An Intro. to Spanish Filmic Discourse (4)
An advanced study of Spanish cinema and its cinematographic expression through a systematic analysis of the filmic processes. Based on four basic issues in Spanish films: hybridization; violence; sexual allure; and regional cinemas (Catalan and Basque), students will explore how language mechanisms - ellipsis, transitions, metaphors, symbols, dialogues, narrative processes, time and space are utilized by filmmakers to create unique discursive texts.

Fulfills: DIT
SPAN 320 - Formerly 169 - Memories and Migration: U.S. Latinos in Literature & Film (4)
This course studies works that follow the tradition of the (auto)biographical and life writings modes of self-representation as they examine the migration, dislocation and settlement in the U.S. of individuals and communities and their process of cultural negotiation and integration. We will focus on their discursive strategies in relation to the past, nostalgia and memory. We will engage these works with current social elements, such as mass media and local and national policies. Using postcolonial theories of discourse, we will also examine how these works situate themselves in light of emerging cultural identities and new cultural realignments.
Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN+120 Corequisite or Prerequisite: SPAN+120 or permission of Instructor. Check department listing.
SPAN 334 - Formerly 170 - Cultures in Contact and Conflict in the Hisp. World (4)
This course explores the notions of cultural contact and conflict in several socio-geographic contexts in the Spanish-speaking world including: the U.S.-Mexico border region, indigenous and mestizo communities in Mexico and Central America, and the sociocultural and political influence of the U.S. in Puerto Rico. The course examines the concepts of cultural hybridity, contact and conflict, ethnicity and race, adaptation, and cultural/language contact. Course readings draw on a combination of historical analysis, ethnographic studies, autobiography, fiction, poetry, essays, and film in order explore the many manifestations of contact in these three unique contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN+120
Fulfills: BI, DIT, WI
SPAN 254 - Formerly 171 - The Making of the U.S. -Mexico Border (4)
This interdisciplinary course examines the sociopolitical construction of the border between the United States and Mexico. Students will examine the history and culture of the border region on both sides of the international boundary and how the border has defined each nation. We will examine environmental issues, labor and economic systems, tourism, immigration and migration, grassroots activism, and border security in our exploration of the complex relationship between these two countries and their citizens.
Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN+120.
Fulfills: BI, DUS, DIT
SPAN 394 - Formerly 180 - Hispanic Studies Seminar (4)
An advanced seminar on a topic relating to the language, culture, and/or literature of the Hispanic world. Emphasis on research and critical thinking. Topic changes annually. Open to juniors and seniors and others by permission. Required once of all majors.
Offered spring semester. Same as: MAT+824
SPAN 400 - Formerly 199 - HISPANIC STUDIES SEMINAR (3)
The Capstone is the culmination of a students work in the Spanish major. Required of all majors not completing an honors thesis. It is a summative experience of the skills and approaches acquired by an undergraduate student throughout the major in correspondence with National Standards. It will consist of three components: A revised research paper drawing on the work, content and methodologies from one of the Hispanic Studies Seminars regularly offered by the Spanish department. In consultation with Spanish Department faculty, students will complete revisions and any further research/expansion of the paper, and also prepare to present that research to peers and faculty members at the Spanish Departments Hispanic Studies Colloquium a public forum showcasing the research of graduating Spanish majors Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI). Each student will be administered the OPI following the National Standards established by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Writing Proficiency Test (WPT). Each student will be administered the WPT following the National Standards established by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Prerequisite: Hispanic Studies Seminar, or concurrent registration with a Hispanic Studies Seminar.
SPAN 182 - Formerly 20 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written Spanish II (4)
Continues and completes the introduction to the Spanish language. Progressive mastering of the four skills toward a goal of low-intermediate proficiency level. Emphasis on using language in context to expand self-expression. Open to students who have completed SPAN+1, or who have been assigned to this course after placement examination. Twenty-five percent of the course done outside of class using various technologies.
Prerequisite: SPAN+1 Offered every semester.
SPAN 281 - Formerly 30 - Intermediate Spanish (4)
A review of basic Spanish with a concentration on refinement of skills toward a goal of advanced proficiency in written expression and spoken accuracy. Uses Hispanic cultural and literary texts to assist in vocabulary expansion and to develop techniques in mastering authentic language in context. Open to students who have completed SPAN+20, or who have been assigned to this course after placement examination. Twenty-five percent of the course done outside class using various technologies.
Meets: Three hours class, two hours in the LRC Prerequisite: SPAN+20 Offered every semester.
SPAN 202 - Formerly 31 - Oral and Written Skills for Heritage Learners (4)
This course is designed to further develop reading and writing skills and improve the linguistic proficiency of heritage learners who learned Spanish at home or in their community. Stress on grammar control and expository writing, as well as implications of bicultural identity and recognition of regional linguistic variations. Students become familiarized with grammatical terminology and also learn how to use writing conventions in Spanish. Students develop oral and written Spanish for academic and professional contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN+20, placement or special permission.
SPAN 299 - Formerly 99 - Spanish Across the Curriculum (1-2)
Foreign Languages Across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: SPAN+30 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester.

SPCH

SPCH 101 - Formerly 1 - Speech Fundamentals (4)
Provides students with a variety of extemporaneous and impromptu speaking experiences, which develop the student's skills in the organization, content, and delivery of public communication. Includes some vocal exercise work to help train the speaker to better understand, use, and control the voice and body in performance. Overall aim is to help students feel more confident in their ability to "think on their feet" and present ideas in a clear and interesting manner.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
SPCH 301 - Formerly 105 - Advanced Speech (4)
Designed for the serious student who wishes to excel in oral communication. Builds on previous experience with extemporaneous and impromptu speaking to give each student practice at speech-making that is specialized to his/her career plans. Emphasizes careful crafting of speeches, debate, fielding questions, leading panel discussions, making an impact in two minutes, and holding interest in longer presentations. Uses video resources to tape and analyze performances. Students are required to attend selected speeches given on campus.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: SPCH+1 or equivalent and permission of instructor

THEA

THEA 210 - Formerly 109 - Theatre History I: Origins to Restoration (4)
An examination of the development of Western theatre from its origins through the Greeks, Romans, Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Restoration, in relation to culture and society. Also includes study of Asian theatre, including Japanese Noh theatre. Gives consideration to plays, criticism, theatres, audiences, performers, styles, and conventions of theatrical production.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+15 Offered fall semester.
Fulfills: WM
THEA 310 - Formerly 110 - Theatre History II: Enlightenment-World War II I (4)
An examination of the development of Western theatre in relation to culture and society from the Enlightenment through the beginnings of Modern Theatre. An exploration of the significant departures and complements to the mainstream as well as other compelling traditions, particularly those of Japan, China, and Bali. Gives consideration to the plays, criticism, theatres, audiences, performers, styles, conventions of theatrical production.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+109 Offered spring semester .
Fulfills: WM
THEA 311 - Formerly 111 - Thea. Hist.III: Contemporary Performance and Dramatic Crit. (4)
An examination of the significant departures from and the complements to the mainstream such as the development of non-commercial theatre and the growth of multiculturalism, performance art, and inter-active, multi-disciplinary theatre. Gives consideration to the plays, criticism, theatres, audiences, performers, styles, and conventions of theatre production. Students will synthesize and correlate classroom work with ongoing observation of historical influences in contemporary theatre, developing familiarity with the particular theatres and artists who are currently interpreting, rejecting, or re-inventing theatre history.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+110 Offered fall semester.
THEA 321 - Formerly 121 - Historic Research for Theatrical Production (2)
This course serves as an introduction to the principles of period research for theatrical production. Specific attention will be given to period dress and dcor, research techniques utilized by theatrical designers and technologists, and drafting and rendering techniques. The course will be in lecture format and will include extensive theoretical production projects.
Prerequisite: THEA+25.
THEA 225 - Formerly 122 - Scene Painting (2)
The art of scenic painting, examining a wide variety of painting techniques used in the theatre. Each student completes several scenic painting projects.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25 and permission of instructor.
THEA 323 - Formerly 123 - Graphic Communication for the Theatre (2)
This course serves as an in depth study into the modes of technical drawing and presentation of the Theatre designer and technician. Students will learn the basic requirements set forth by the International Standards Organization (ISO), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the comprehensive standards of the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT). Attention will be given to basic drafting concepts including geometric construction, types of drawings proscribed by ISO and ANSI standards, specific drawings relevant to theatre production, and lettering. The course will also introduce students to Computer Assisted Design by utilizing commonly used software such as AutoCAD and VectorWorks.
Prerequisite: THEA+25.
THEA 324 - Formerly 124 - Sound Design for the Theatre Arts (2)
The course will focus on the principles and practice of sound design, and the role of the sound designer within the context of a collaborative process. Additional attention will be given to audio engineering and electronics. The course will be in lecture format and will include extensive theoretical production projects
Prerequisite: THEA+25.
THEA 322 - Formerly 125 - Creative Collaboration (2-4)
This course will explore how designers and directors collaborate in the theatre. We will examine how some of the great collaborators of our time create their work and discuss the challenges which they often face. Students will team up to create their own in-class projects taking on the roles of director and designer to immerse themselves in this process.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25, THEA+26, THEA+35, and permission of instructor
THEA 326 - Formerly 126 - Advanced Lighting Design (2)
An advanced study of lighting design. Examines theories and approaches, as well as drawing, rendering, and drafting techniques. Includes use of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) technology and other software as a tool to aid the designer. Each student completes several advanced design projects and light labs.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25, THEA+26, THEA+35, and permission of instructor.
THEA 327 - Formerly 127 - Advanced Costume Design (2)
An advanced study of costume design. Examines theories and approaches, as well as drawing, rendering, and painting techniques. Includes use of computer technology as a tool to aid the designed. Each student completes several design projects.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25, THEA+26, THEA+35, and permission of instructor.
THEA 325 - Formerly 128 - Advanced Set Design (2)
An advanced study of scenic design. Examines theories and approaches, as well as drawing, rendering, and drafting techniques. Includes use of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) technology and other software as a tool to aid the designer. Each student completes several advanced design projects.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25, THEA+26, THEA+35, and permission of instructor.
THEA 320 - Formerly 129 - Advanced Theatre Technology (4)
The course will primarily focus on the principles and practice of Technical Direction and Production Management and the role of the Technical Director within the context of a collaborative process. The course will also include in depth study of subjects such as stage carpentry, stage electronics, shop management, stage rigging, and technical drafting. The course will also introduce subjects such as motion control, and common trade practices.
Course may be repeated one time. Prerequisite: THEA+25.
THEA 330 - Formerly 130 - Advanced Acting: Technique (4)
An extensive exploration of the actor's process for the experienced student. Through exercises, scenework and journal assignments, students investigate the specific technique of a master teacher of acting such as Sanford Meisner.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Recommended: THEA 232 - Formerly 36 - and/or 37 Prerequisite: THEA+15, THEA+35 and permission of instructor
THEA 333 - Formerly 137 - Actors' Lab: Scenes II (2)
A course geared to the actor's individual skills, to strengthen performance in scene study. Students will investigate material from the world repertoire, exploring periods and styles.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+130 Offered spring semester, in the second half of the semester.
THEA 338 - Formerly 138 - Advanced Acting: Special Topics (2-4)
An emphasis on specific challenges an actor faces with advanced material. Topics covered from semester to semester include elements of characterization, period, language and style, voice and movement, and research. Students explore scenes, exercises, and rehearsal methods as dictated by the material.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+130 and permission of instructor (possibly by audition) Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
THEA 345 - Formerly 145 - Problems in Directing (1-2)
A study of the process of directing through the experience of directing a one-act or full-length play for public performance. Classroom discussion focuses on works in progress, with special emphasis on the problems of translating a text to the stage; working with actors, designers, playwrights; composition and creating stage business; style; rhythm.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+45, stage management of department production, and permission of instructor Offered every semester.
THEA 101 - Formerly 15 - The Art of the Play (4)
A survey of major works of the theatrical repertoire with special emphasis on understanding play construction and developing an analytical process that inspires and facilitates translation of dramatic writing into theatrical presentation.
Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
THEA 355 - Formerly 155 - Advanced Playwriting (4)
A writer's workshop with an emphasis on form, language, theatricality, and deep revision. Students complete a full-length play or two one-act plays. Class meetings focus on the reading and discussion of student work and selected published plays as well as preparing manuscripts for production and publication.
May be repeated for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+55 and permission of instructor Offered fall semester.
THEA 365 - Formerly 165 - Selected Topics in Dramatic Literature (2)
A study of selected plays from one or more periods of dramatic achievement, emphasizing their theatrical qualities and staging. Periods studied and specific emphases vary when offered.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+5 or THEA+15 and permission of instructor
THEA 366 - Formerly 166 - Dramaturgy (2)
This course is designed to expose students to various facets of dramaturgy including: research, collaboration with directors and actors, criticism and reviews, collaboration with playwrights in new play development, and adaptation and/or translation. This class should prove valuable both for those interested in working as dramaturgs, and for directors, writers, designers, and performers wishing to collaborate with professional dramaturgs in years to come. The course is divided into various units reflecting different facets of dramaturgy. Readings, discussion, and a hands-on project are assigned for each unit.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+15 and the permission of the instructor.
THEA 367 - Formerly 167 - Enter Laughing (4)
Aristotle didn't care for it. Mae West got arrested for it. Great comedy engages the same life and death themes as tragedy, allowing artist and audience to go deeper into issues than convention and taboo ordinarily allow. From the pacifist cross-dressers of Lysistrata to the globe-trotting resistance fighters of Lisa Kron's The Verizon Play, this course will examine how rules are made and broken, how gender is defined and bent, how hot topics are set ablaze, shedding light, cauterizing wounds and sometimes leveling the ground between the powerless and the powerful.
Signature Required. Prerequisite: THEA+15 or permission of the instructor. Offering to be determined.
THEA 383 - Formerly 169 - British Political Drama (4)
Under the premise that all theatre has a political dimension and works its influence on audiences both overtly and subversively, this course is designed to take advantage of the huge variety of productions available in London venues (not necessarily conventional theatre spaces), with a focus on the political questions they raise for twenty-first century audiences. Because the 1960s saw big changes on the theatrical scene in Britain it is taken as a starting point, and we see what we can of the playwrights who helped form our present day theatre through the twentieth century. Because it does not operate in a vacuum, appropriate plays may be chosen from other periods and cultures that address crucial global, social and political issues.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: ENGL+169
Fulfills: BH, BA
THEA 375 - Formerly 175 - Special Topics in Theatre: (1-4)
In depth study in theatre related subjects at the Advanced level. Topics could focus on any area of the theatre.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Student must have completed at least 8 credits in Theatre Arts.
THEA 302 - Formerly 180 - Theatre Practice: Shop Technician (-1)
Significant practical project under faculty supervision as a technician working for 30 hours in one area of production. Scene shop, lighting or costume shop. Summary paper required at completion of project. Theatre arts majors: MUST complete two credits of this course toward graduation. May take up to two total credits of , 184, 185, 186, 187 and/or 188 per semester; a total of six credits can be counted toward the degree. Students must consult with the faculty member assigned to the course and formally enroll in this course at the beginning of the semester.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Non-majors: One credit per semester, up to a total of four credits. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25. Offered every semester.
THEA 380 - Formerly 182 - Research Tutorial (4)
Each student conducts research and writes a paper on a topic approved by the London program instructor. The project stresses normal library research as well as personal interviews and other out-of-class experiences as part of the research process. Students are urged to consult with their home campus adviser about their topic before going to London.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester. Same as: PSCI+182
THEA 305 - Formerly 184 - Theatre Practice: Acting (-1)
Significant practical project under faculty supervision as an actor in a major role for the department's production program. Summary paper required at completion of project. Theatre arts majors: up to two total credits of , 184, 185, 186, 187 and/or 188 per semester; up to a total of six credits can be counted toward the degree. Students must consult with the faculty member assigned to the course (to determine whether the project is sufficient for credit) and formally enroll with the Registrar's Office before completion of the project (i.e., before the end of the production) to receive academic credit.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Non-majors: One credit per semester, up to a total of four credits. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+35. Offered every semester.
THEA 300 - Formerly 185 - Theatre Practice (-1)
Significant practical projects under faculty supervision in one or more designated area(s) of the department's production program-acting (a major role), playwright-in-rehearsal, design, stage management, technical direction, master electrician. Summary paper required at completion of project.
Theatre arts majors: up to two total credits of THEA+185, 186, and/or 187 per semester; up to a total of six credits can be counted toward the degree. Students must consult with the faculty member assigned to the course (to determine whether the project is sufficient for credit) and formally enroll with the Registrar's Office before completion of the project (i.e., before the end of the production) to receive academic credit. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Non-majors: One credit per semester, up to a total of four credits. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
THEA 303 - Formerly 186 - Theatre Practice: Design (-1)
A study of the process of design through the experience of designing in the department's production season. Classroom discussion/presentation focuses on works in progress, with special emphasis on the problems of creating and executing a design for the stage; working with directors, other designers, technicians and crew; drafting and rendering techniques. Enrollment is required of all students designing sets, lights or costumes, in the production season, in a given semester.
Theatre arts majors: up to two total credits of THEA+185, 186, and/or 187 per semester; up to a total of six credits can be counted toward the degree. Non majors: one credit of THEA+185, THEA+186, and/or THEA+187 per semester; up to four credits can be counted toward the degree. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+25 Corequisite: THEA+26. Offered every semester.
THEA 304 - Formerly 187 - Theatre Practice: Stage Management (1)
A study of the process of stage managing through the experience of stage managing in the department's production season. Classroom discussion and presentations focus on works in progress, with special emphasis on the stage manager's role in production organization and communication. Enrollment is required of all students' stage managing a production in a given semester. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Theatre arts majors: up to two total credits of THEA+185, THEA+186, and/or THEA+187 per semester; up to a total of six credits can be counted toward the degree. Non majors: one credit of THEA+185, THEA+186, and/or THEA+187 per semester; up to four credits can be counted toward the degree. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
THEA 306 - Formerly 188 - Theatre Practice: Dance (-1)
A study of the process of dance through the experience of performing in the department's dance concert.
Summary paper required at completion of project. Students must: consult with the faculty member assigned to the course (to determine whether the project is sufficient for credit), and formally enroll with the Registrar's Office before completion of the project (i.e., before the end of the production) to receive academic credit. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DAN+2 or DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DANC - Formerly DAN+24 as a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Every Semester.
THEA 386 - Formerly 190 - Theatre In The Community: The Newark Collaboration (4)
This course is a collaborative theatre-making enterprise in which Drew students will team with high school students from the Newark inner city schools to create original work that will be presented both on Drew's campus and at the Marion Bolden Student Center in Newark. Classes will likewise meet at both locations, with Drew students and Newark students traveling to the two sites by turn. Drew participants will both mentor and share in the process of original play development and performance. In addition to the weekly play development workshops and rehearsals with the Newark students, Drew participants will meet frequently on their own, to assess and develop strategies for facilitating the work of the full group and keeping it on track. A research component studying the historical impact of community-based theaters around the globe, together with a final paper, will also be required of Drew students.
Course may be repeated. Enrollment restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Enrollment priority: Priority given to theatre majors, theatre minors, and seniors. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Pre-Requisite: At least 8 prior credits of theatre classes required. Offered every spring semester.
Fulfills: DUS, OCE
THEA 200 - Formerly 191S - The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey Apprenticeship/ Internship (4)
A full-time apprenticeship or internship lasting from early May through late August with the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey. The specifics of each assignment are determined by the department, the Shakespeare Theatre, and the individual student. The apprentice program is designed for students with little experience and a primary interest in acting. Apprentices receive intensive training in scene study, voice and movement, and have broad exposure to all aspects of theatre production, gaining valuable knowledge and experience in each. The internship program is designed for more advanced students interested in developing their knowledge and skills in a specific, non-acting area, such as set, lighting, or costume design, directing, stage management, general management, publicity, and box office. Requirements include the keeping of a journal that records the student's day-to-day activities and experiences, a detailed written summary of the entire apprenticeship/internship, and a creative project. All work must be completed before the student finishes the program. Exact completion date and nature of the creative project are determined in consultation with the Shakespeare Theatre and the Drew faculty adviser. Drew students receiving four credits for THEA+191S can apply only four additional credits of internship (INTC 200 - Formerly INTR 50 -) toward the degree.
Additional tuition required when taken during summer. Signature of instructor required for registration.
THEA 201 - Formerly 192 - 9TH AND MADISON SUMMER THEATRE INTENSIVE (6)
No description is available for this course.
THEA 301 - Formerly 195 - Independent Study in Theatre Arts (1-4)
A tutorial course stressing independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. Regular meetings with adviser and written assignments or creative projects.
May be repeated once for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: At least eight credits in theatre arts courses Offered every semester.
THEA 400 - Formerly 196 - Theatre Arts Capstone: Junior Year (2)
The Theatre Arts Major capstone is a two-semester sequence consisting of regular seminar meetings, written assignments, guest speakers, and appropriate involvement in the "Theatre Capstone Festival" at the end of the senior year. The major goal of the capstone is to help students gain perspective on their academic and production work in the department and to contextualize these efforts both within the broader liberal arts and in the theatre world beyond Drew. In the junior year, weekly seminar discussions and written work will focus on self-reflection and assessment, and will develop into an on-line portfolio for each student and include a personal inventory of historical and contemporary sources of inspiration. Also in the junior year capstone course, students will work with the capstone advisor to produce a formal proposal for their participation in the "Theatre Capstone Festival," to be presented in the Spring of the Senior Year.
[CAP] Capstone. Enrollment limited to Senior Theatre Arts Majors and approved Minors only. Signature of department chair or professor required. Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.
THEA 387 - Formerly 197 - Theatre Semester: Internship (9)
A full-time internship with an established professional theatre in New York New Jersey metropolitan area, including the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey on campus or Playwrights Theatre of N.J. Specifics of each assignment are determined by the theatre arts department, the theatre involved, and the individual student. Most internships are entry-level positions with a variety of tasks, allowing the student to gain a working knowledge of and experience in the professional theatre as both a business and an art. Increased responsibilities during the course of the internship depend upon a student's performance and the needs of the theatre. All interns meet regularly with the faculty supervisor to examine various topics relating to the professional theatre. A detailed written summary of the internship is due at the end of the semester. Internships in New York City or at a distance from campus usually require students to live, at their own expense, off campus, suitably convenient to their work.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Open only to qualified Drew theatre arts majors Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
THEA 388 - Formerly 198 - Theatre Semester: Independent Study (3)
Several research papers, the topics of which to be chosen in consultation with faculty adviser, undertaken as part of the Theatre Semester program.
Open only to qualified Drew theatre arts majors Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
THEA 401 - Formerly 199 - Theatre Arts Capstone: Senior Year (2)
The Theatre Arts Major capstone is a two-semester sequence consisting of regular seminar meetings, written assignments, guest speakers, and appropriate involvement in the "Theatre Capstone Festival" at the end of the senior year. The major goal of the capstone is to help students gain perspective on their academic and production work in the department and to contextualize these efforts both within the broader liberal arts and in the theatre world beyond Drew. In the senior year capstone course, students will begin the semester developing of a manifesto of one's motivations and goals in doing theatre. The rest of the semester will be devoted to preparation of performance pieces or other appropriate materials to be presented as part of the capstone festival. Enrollment limited to Senior Theatre Arts Majors and approved Minors only.
[CAP] Capstone. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Enrollment limited to Senior Theatre Arts Majors and approved Minors only. . Signature of department chair or professor required. Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: THEA+196 Permission of instructor.
THEA 120 - Formerly 25 - Theatre Technology (4)
An introduction to the theory, techniques, materials, and equipment of theatre technology. Focuses on the principles and practice of set and costume construction, scenery painting, the nature and use of electricity, lighting, and sound equipment, tools and their safe usage, technical production organization and management. Lecture format with extensive practical laboratory work.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Corequisite: Must register for Thea 25L. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
THEA 220 - Formerly 26 - Theatre Design (4)
An introduction to the theory, process, and techniques of set, lighting, and costume design. Students will learn how to create and express information in 3 dimensions using, established drafting practices, creating scale models, drawings, and light plots. Painting and rendering techniques will be explored in costume and set renderings. The course will also include principles and dynamics of design, the development of a design concept, script analysis from the designer's perspective, and color theory. Lecture/lab format.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+15, 25 or equivalent and permission of instructor Offered each semester.
Fulfills: Q
THEA 135 - Formerly 35 - Acting and Directing (4)
A laboratory course in the basic theories and techniques of acting and directing. Extensive scene work, class exercises, and written analyses. Each student directs two scenes and acts in at least four.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
Fulfills: BA
THEA 232 - Formerly 36 - Actor's Lab: Monologues I (2)
A course geared to the actor's individual skills, to strengthen performance in monologues. Students will work with contemporary plays, developing character, emotional truth, and physical action.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+35
THEA 233 - Formerly 37 - Actors' Lab: Scenes I (2)
A course geared to the actor's individual skills, to strengthen performance in scene study. Students will work with contemporary plays, developing character, emotional truth, and physical action.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+35 Offered spring semester, in the first half of the semester.
THEA 235 - Formerly 38 - Movement for the actor (2)
Acting students will work carefully and in-depth to develop the unique qualities necessary for expert stage performance, beginning with relaxation, balance, alignment and coordination, and extending to sophisticated use of the physical instrument to interpret a variety of characters and styles. Dedicated techniques such as the Feldenkrais and/or Alexander Methods will be studied and applied, offering each participant an individualized approach to body awareness and forming the "mind-body" connection necessary for excellence in dramatic performance. Classes will involve both personalized exercises and the physical interpretation dramatic material.
Enrollment priority: Second-year students. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+35.
THEA 236 - Formerly 39 - The Actor's Voice (2)
Serious students of acting will explore techniques to free and enhance the natural speaking voice for performance in a full range of classical and modern drama. Classes will employ a rigorous technique such as the Linklater system to promote relaxation, breath control, production, articulation and emotional connectedness. Drills, poetry and dramatic monologue work done in this class (offered the first half of each semester) will lead students directly into THEA+36/ Actor's Lab: Monologues (offered in the second half of each semester).
Signature of instructor of program director required. Prerequisite: THEA+35.
THEA 245 - Formerly 45 - Intermediate Directing (4)
A study of the theory and practice of directing, from the selection of a play through casting, rehearsals, and performance. Emphasizes script analysis and how one translates the playwright's vision into theatrical reality. Coursework includes written assignments and scene projects that help students better understand the art and craft of directing while developing and refining skills and techniques in the discipline. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+26 (can be taken at the same time), THEA+35, and permission of instructor.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+35 Offered spring semester.
THEA 105 - Formerly 5 - Introduction to Theatre Arts (4)
An introduction to the theory and practice of the theatre and its arts and crafts: acting, directing, playwriting, design, production/administration. Combines background and theory for each discipline with work on creative projects that demonstrate and implement the theories and principles. Requires no previous theatrical experience.
THEA 255 - Formerly 55 - Playwriting (4)
Writing the one-act play from rough draft through polished revision. Exercises in characterization, plot, setting, dialogue, theme, metaphor and dramatic structure. Course focuses on developing material based on observation, adaptation, and imagination through the use of journals, newspapers and improvisation. Class meetings focus on the reading and discussion of student work and selected published plays.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: THEA+15 and permission of instructor Offered every semester.
Fulfills: WM
THEA 262 - Formerly 62 - African-American Theatre (2-4)
This class will chart African-American theatre from minstrelsy to contemporary performance. Throughout the course we will investigate the relationship between African-American theatre and the American socio-political landscape: How does theatre both reflect and shape its time period? How is African-American theatre influenced by or a reaction against theatre created by White artists? The texts examined will also be used to explore some fundamental questions about the nature and purpose of theatre: How have various African-American artists opened up new terrain both socially and aesthetically? Is theatre a form of entertainment or social protest or ritual? How can these forms be combined? In addition, we will look at the kinds of relationships explored in the plays: What types of racial or ethnic relationships are depicted? What about gender, sexual orientation, and class? Finally, we will examine the role of the African-American artist: How does one define African-American theatre-is
Meets: Once a week for the entire semester.
Fulfills: DUS, WI
THEA 271 - Formerly 64 - Show: Business (2)
A dramatic literature seminar exploring how modern theatre looks at ways of doing business, from Naturalism (Hauptman's The Weavers) through Expressionism (Treadwell's Machinal), Epic theatre (Brecht's Mother Courage) and Realism (Ibsen's An Enemy of the People). The intersection of race, gender and economy will be examined in works ranging from Shaw's Major Barbara to Anna Deveare Smith's Twilight. Videos may include such work as The Cradle Will Rock, Death of a Salesman and Raisin in the Sun. Students will examine readings through written analysis and group discussion.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
THEA 265 - Formerly 65 - Women in the Theatre (4)
A selected study of the contributions of women in the theatre, with special focus on plays by women. Course may be organized by historical period(s) or appropriate theme. Also could include study of other women theatrical artists and practitioners: actors, directors, designers, artistic directors, producers.
May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
THEA 270 - Formerly 70 - Performing Arts Administration (4)
An introduction to the basic cultural role, issues, structures, operations, and personnel of performing arts (music and theatre) organizations, focusing primarily on the non-profit sector. Contextual subjects will include: an arts institution's role in and responsibility to its community; government's role in the arts; issues of control and power within the organization. Specific topics will include: types of organizations and organizational structures; marketing, publicity and public relations; fundraising, donor relations, grant writing; long-range planning.
Prerequisite: At least 8 credits in Theatre Arts or Music. Same as: MUS+70

WGST

WGST 301 - Formerly 111 - History of Feminist Thought (4)
An interdisciplinary course that explores the development of feminist theories principally in the United States and Europe from Mary Wollstonecraft through "the Second Wave. The course examines the work of such theorists as Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Anna Julia Cooper, Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Mary Church Terrell, Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan, as well as feminism's evolving conversations with liberalism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis and its dialogues with the anti-slavery/civil rights movements and the gay/lesbian rights movements.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (WGST+12 or WMST+12) Offered fall semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WI
WGST 310 - Formerly 112 - Contemporary Feminist Theory and Methodology (4)
An interdisciplinary course focused on contemporary feminist theory. The objectives of the course are first, to explore the broad range of theories that make up the body of contemporary scholarship referred to as "feminist theory"; second, to examine feminist critiques and innovations in methodologies in many fields; and third, to consider some of the fundamental questions these theories raise about the origins of gender difference, the nature and origins of patriarchy, the intersections between gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality as categories of analysis and bases of oppression or empowerment.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (WMST+12 or WGST+12) Offered fall semester in alternate years.
Fulfills: WM
WGST 101 - Formerly 12 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (4)
An interdisciplinary course designed to lay the groundwork for the women's and gender studies major and minor. Also appropriate as a first course for any student interested in pursuing the study of gender within their major field. This U.S. focused course considers questions fundamental to the field: What is a woman? What is gender? What is sex? How does culture construct gender and gender difference? How do gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality intersect and interact?; the course, also, lays the groundwork for further work in the field by introducing students to analytical and critical concepts and approaches for understanding the lives of women and the construction of gender within larger social, political, and cultural structures; and it considers how we think about individual lives using these questions.
Required for women's and gender studies majors and minors. Offered spring semester annually.
Fulfills: BI, DUS
WGST 311 - Formerly 122 - Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (2-4)
An interdisciplinary course designed to lay the groundwork for the women's and gender studies major and minor. Also appropriate as a first course for any student interested in pursuing the study of gender within their major field. This U.S. focused course considers questions fundamental to the field: What is a woman? What is gender? What is sex? How does culture construct gender and gender difference? How do gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality intersect and interact?; the course, also, lays the groundwork for further work in the field by introducing students to analytical and critical concepts and approaches for understanding the lives of women and the construction of gender within larger social, political, and cultural structures; and it considers how we think about individual lives using these questions.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: WGST+12 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined.
WGST 331 - Formerly 131 - Gender and Culture (4)
A study of the construction of gender across cultures. The course considers how culture influences and shapes gender roles in varying human domains, such as religion, creative traditions, work, scholarship and research, and popular culture.
Prerequisite: ANTH+4 or permission of instructor Offering to be determined Same as: ANTH+131
WGST 318 - Formerly 138 - Gender and Globalization (4)
In this class we will examine how scholars have understood and made sense of how gender issues intersect with economic globalization. Two ways in which economic globalization is manifest is through changes in trade in goods and services, and migration. We will focus on these two aspects of economic globalization. As we will discover through the readings and our discussions, scholars from a range of disciplines/theoretical frameworks, (eg economics, history, cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, political science, feminist, post-colonial theory), have contributed to our understanding of economic globalization and the way in which gender and globalization intersect.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: ECON+5 or WGST+12. Offering to be determined.
Fulfills: DIT, WI
WGST 300 - Formerly 150 - Independent Study in Women's and Gender Studies (4)
A tutorial course. Independent investigation of a topic, preferably interdisciplinary, chosen in consultation with the instructor and the director of women's studies. Regular meetings by arrangement with the instructor. Oral and written work.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: WGST+12 offered every semester
WGST 390 - Formerly 172 - Advanced Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies (4)
Graduate courses being taken for undergraduate credit will be cross-listed under this course number. Possible courses include CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+444: Ethically Responding to Violence Against Women; BBST - Formerly BIBST+731: Gender and Sexuality in the Bible and the Fathers; ENGL - Formerly ENGLG+826: Feminist Criticism.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: WGST+12 and permission of the instructor Offering to be determined.
WGST 400 - Formerly 199 - Women's Studies and Gender Studies Capstone (4)
Capstone course for the major completed by all students who are not doing an honors thesis. An independent investigation at an advanced level of a topic, preferably interdisciplinary, chosen in consultation with the instructor and the director of women's and gender studies. The student designs the capstone project so that it draws on the work they have completed for the major both in core and cross-listed courses. Regular meetings by arrangement with the instructor. Oral and written work.
[CAP] Capstone Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: WGST+12, WGST+52, and either WGST+111 or WGST+112.
WGST 211 - Formerly 22 - Topics in Women's Studies (4)
Description pending.
Course may be repeated.
Fulfills: BH, BI, DUS
WGST 201 - Formerly 52 - Global Feminisms (4)
This course examines women's movements internationally and globally. It explores the variations in constructions of sex, gender and gender difference as well as the range of feminisms and women's movements that have emerged from these differing cultural, economic and political situations. Such topics as women and development, the sexual division of labor, health, the environment, the international traffic in women and human rights may be among those explored in the course.
Offered fall semester. Same as: PSCI+54
Fulfills: BI, DIT

WLIT

WLIT 101 - Formerly 10 - Introduction to World Literature (4)
This course introduces students to the comparative study of works of literature from various cultures, read in English translation. We consider diversity of place, social context, politics, history, genre, tradition, and literary movements. We look at literature in relation to its original cultural context and also at the way books communicate to other cultures and to us. The works, cultures, and thematic emphasis will vary from year to year. The initial theme for 2008 and 2009 is "The Literary Journey in World Literature." This course will be team-taught with one or two primary instructors from different departments, with visits from instructors in other literary fields. Students may with permission read works in the original language.

Fulfills: WI, BH, DIT
WLIT 260 - Formerly 60 - Literary Translation (4)
This seminar introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to literary translation, as well as experience in translating literary texts. The course will begin with a history of approaches to translation, by reading both theoretical essays and a set of common texts in multiple translations, including works of classical and Biblical literature as well as contemporary prose and poetry. Each student will then undertake a translation of a short work of fiction or poetry with the goal of producing a publishable text in English. Students may work from any language into English or from a dialect or historical variety of English into a contemporary idiom. The seminar will feature guest lectures by Drew faculty from various programs whose work includes literary translation speaking about their own projects and experience as translators.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: WLIT+60 or permission of instructor. Same as: ENGL+43