BBST - Formerly BIBST

BBST 501 - Formerly BIBST 101 - Biblical Literature I: Torah, Prophets, Writings (3)
An introduction to the first testament as a source for understanding and appropriating the religious experiences, insights, commitments, and expectations of the various communities of ancient Israel. The focus is on learning to interpret biblical texts with theological and ethical sensitivity, using the tools and skills of historical-critical, social-scientific, and literary-critical research.
Offered fall semester annually.
BBST 603 - Formerly BIBST 103 - Hebrew Biblical Exegesis (3)
An introduction to exegesis and interpretation of related texts: focus varies.
Course may be repeated. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+742
BBST 606 - Formerly BIBST 106 - Biblical Models for Ministry: Priest, Prophet, and Sage (3)
Survey of the distinctive roles within ancient Israel of the priests, the prophets, and wise persons, with reference to their types of authority, their functions, and their ideologies, with continual reference to these roles as they relate to leadership within the church community.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 507 - Formerly BIBST 107 - Biblical Foundations of Camp/Retreat Ministry (3)
See CERT+310 for course description
Same as: CERT+310
BBST 608 - Formerly BIBST 108 - Preaching with the Hebrew Bible (3)
A study of the various genres of texts (e.g., Prophecy, Psalms, Narratives, and Wisdom texts) in the Old Testament and the appropriate ways to utilize these texts in Christian preaching. Enrollment priority given to D.Min. students. Open to M.Div. and M.T.S. students.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 511 - Formerly BIBST 111 - Biblical Literature 2: Gospels, Epistles, Apocalypse (3)
An introduction to the history, literature, and religion of earliest Christianity; study of selected passages illustrating historical and theological interpretation; collateral readings in scholarly literature. Required of students in the M.Div. program during the first year of study.
Offered spring semester annually.
BBST 613 - Formerly BIBST 113 - New Testament Exegesis (3)
An introduction to exegesis and interpretation of related texts: focus varies.
Course may be repeated. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+743
BBST 515 - Formerly BIBST 115 - Exegetical Skills I (1)
This course is designed as a companion course to Bibst 101 Biblical Literature I. Course content will include 1) an introduction of the rudimentary features of Hebrew 2) training sessions in the use of biblical studies research tool such as Bible Works 3) guidance in the practices of exegetical analysis. (e.g. comparing and contrasting various translations, exploring the semantic ranges of words and grammatical constructions, formulating critical questions, exploring literary and socio-historical context, learning how to do basic research in the field of biblical studies.
Offered Pass/Fail only. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Corequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101.
BBST 516 - Formerly BIBST 116 - Exegetical Skills II (1)
This course is designed as a companion course to Bibst 111 Biblical Literature 2. Course content will include 1) an introduction of the rudimentary features of Greek 2) training sessions in the use of biblical studies research tool such as Bible Works 3) guidance in the practices of exegetical analysis. (e.g. comparing and contrasting various translations, exploring the semantic ranges of words and grammatical constructions, formulating critical questions, exploring literary and socio-historical context, learning how to do basic research in the field of biblical studies.
Offered Pass/Fail only. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Corequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 520 - Formerly BIBST 120 - Sacred Conversations: Teaching the Bible (3)
What does one need to know/to do to better study the sacred text so that the mind is engaged and the soul is freed? What does it mean to teach bible study in a way that both the exterior and the interior life might be nurtured and fed? What are the ways of study that cultivate mature faith and generate communal insight and transformation? Through discussion and hands-on skill development, we will explore approaches and practices for teaching the bible as a spiritual practice.
BBST 540 - Formerly BIBST 140 - Coptic: (3)
An intensive study of the basic elements of Coptic grammar, followed by reading the full Coptic text of the Gospel of Thomas.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of Koine Greek.
BBST 541 - Formerly BIBST 141 - Beginning Hebrew (3)
Basic elements of biblical Hebrew.
BBST 542 - Formerly BIBST 142 - Hebrew Exegesis (3)
Exegesis of selected passages from the Hebrew Bible.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+141 or the equivalent.
BBST 544 - Formerly BIBST 144 - Basic Elements of Egyptian Hie roglyphics (3)
Offerings dependent upon student interest.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+141 or 142 or the equivalent.
BBST 545 - Formerly BIBST 145 - Beginning Greek (3)
Basic elements of biblical Greek.
BBST 546 - Formerly BIBST 146 - Greek Exegesis (3)
Exegesis of selected passages from the Greek New Testament.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+145 or the equivalent.
BBST 547 - Formerly BIBST 147 - Readings in the Hebrew Bible (1-3)
Readings of selected passages in the Hebrew Bible with emphasis on facility in the language.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+141 or 142 or the equivalent. Offerings dependent upon student interest. This course is normally offered as a tutorial.
BBST 548 - Formerly BIBST 148 - Readings in the Greek New Testament (1-3)
Readings of selected passages in the Greek New Testament with emphasis on facility in the language.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+145 or 146 or the equivalent. Offerings dependent upon student interest. This course is normally offered as a tutorial.
BBST 649 - Formerly BIBST 149 - Contemporary Hermeneutics for Preaching the New Testament (3)
An overview of the main critical paradigms in New Testament hermeneutics: historical, literary, social-scientific, and ideological criticisms and their application for preaching the New Testament to a postmodern world. Particular emphasis will be given to contextual perspectives.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 650 - Formerly BIBST 150 - Women in the New Testament (3)
A socio-historical study of the role of women in the world of early Christianity through the writings of the New Testament. Feminist methods of interpretation will be studied to help in the analysis and appropriation of selected women's stories from the Gospels and texts dealing with women in the Pauline letters.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 651 - Formerly BIBST 151 - Texts and Topics in the Pentateuch (3)
Literary and historical problems in the interpretation of the Pentateuch; subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 652 - Formerly BIBST 152 - Texts and Topics in the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible (3)
Studies of historical and literary issues in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+152
BBST 653 - Formerly BIBST 153 - Texts and Topics in the Poetic Literature of the Hebrew Bible (3)
Studies in Hebrew poetic style, wisdom, literature, Psalms, Lamentations, and Song of Songs. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+741
BBST 654 - Formerly BIBST 154 - Texts and Topics: Jeremiah (3)
Studies in social roles, the theological messages, the political concerns, the literary artistry, and the historical contexts of the writing prophets. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+48 BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+748
BBST 655 - Formerly BIBST 155 - Children, Trauma, and the Bible (3)
Statisticians tell us that millions of children around the globe are suffering physical and psychological traumas. Psychologists tell us that what constitutes "healing" for a child who has undergone trauma is still a mystery. How are religious communities to respond to these children in crisis? How do we create awareness? How do we minister to children and their families? For the church, the Bible has been the book most often turned to for guidance in times of trouble. But does the Bible really address the needs of children? In this course we attempt to explore various dimensions of childhood trauma and how the Bible can be both a weapon and a tool when it comes to the care of children.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 and BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 and PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+504 Same as: PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+613
BBST 658 - Formerly BIBST 158 - Proverbs in the Bible and African Literature (3)
Proverbial wisdom as a part of the larger corpus of wisdom Literature, with its concern with issues of ethical and savoire-faire, practical know-how, plays an important role in the creation, critique, and maintenance of social, religious, and political structures in Africa and in the Bible. The course will explore how theoretical issues about the nature, content, and function of proverbial wisdom in African literature can impact and contribute to the interpretation of biblical proverbs. Accordingly, the course will combine rhetorical criticism and reader-response analyses in exploring these issues. A central focus will be on Proverb Performance: the purposeful transmission of a proverbial saying in a particular context in order to provoke and evaluate responses in both oral and literary contexts.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101. Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+750
BBST 659 - Formerly BIBST 159 - Women, Wives, and Wenches in the Bible (3)
Reading women's stories, demographics, and activities as portrayed in ancient sacred, historical, classics, and novels. We will compare these with classical and contemporary discourses that contained the ideological framework by which classical womanhood is constructed.
BBST 665 - Formerly BIBST 165 - Topics in Hebrew Bible (3)
Studies in the theological themes and paradigms of the Old Testament and in issues involved in theological interpretation. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 669 - Formerly BIBST 169 - Religions of the Ancient Near East (3)
Study of the religions of Mesopotamia (Sumeria, Babylonia, Assyria), Egypt, Anatolia, and Syria-Palestine (Canaan, Aram) through analysis of literature and archaeological remains. Special attention is given to general religious questions and to the interrelationship of Israel and other ancient Near Eastern cultures.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 Same as: REL+169 BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+739
BBST 670 - Formerly BIBST 170 - Biblical Conceptions of Afterlife (3)
Study of such topics as Sheol, heaven, Gehenna, and Hades, together with other related topics, such as divine reward and punishment, resurrection, and Satan. Emphasis on isolating the origins of each of these concepts and tracing their development through both the Old and New Testaments and other relevant ancient literature.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 and BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 675 - Formerly BIBST 175 - The Synoptic Gospels (3)
Historical, literary, and theological analysis of one or more of the synoptic gospels.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+715
BBST 676 - Formerly BIBST 176 - The Johannine Literature (3)
Historical, literary, and theological problems in the interpretation of the fourth Gospel and the Johannine epistles; particular attention is given to the religious-historical background of Johannine theology.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 677 - Formerly BIBST 177 - Studies in Pauline Literature (3)
Historical problems in the interpretation of the letters of Paul. Special attention is given to the theology of Paul and the meaning of Paul's theology for the church today.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 678 - Formerly BIBST 178 - The Literature of the Emerging Church (3)
Historical and theological study of the writings of the emerging church: deutero-Pauline Epistles, Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, Revelation, Apostolic Fathers.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 681 - Formerly BIBST 181 - The Bible and Homosexuality (3)
This course will center on an in-depth exegesis of all the verses in the Bible that deal with or relate to homosexuality, both in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the New Testament. The goal throughout will be to situate this material in relation both to the ancient cultural contexts in which it was produced and the present ecclesiastical contexts in which it is interpreted, and to bring these two sets of contexts into creative and productive dialogue.
Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 682 - Formerly BIBST 182 - The Book of Genesis: Interpretation, Proclamation, and Moral Reflection (3)
Exegetical study of Genesis, with emphasis on how this ancient text might be considered a resource for theological and ethical reflection in contemporary society, and how exegetical work might be used to enhance ministry in church and community.
BBST 684 - Formerly BIBST 184 - Judging Judges (3)
Study of what has been a troubling book for many Christians, primarily on account of its violence and God's seeming sanction of, even participation in, that violence. Special attention is given to the book's narrative complexity and moral ambiguity; the ways in which its images continue to permeate contemporary society; and the problem posed by its existence in the biblical canon.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite BBST - Formerly BIBST+101.
BBST 679 - Formerly BIBST 187 - Topics in Biblical Studies (3)
The topic for this course changes and will be announced at the time of registration. This course may be repeated for credit.
May be repeated for credit.
BBST 688 - Formerly BIBST 188 - Cross-Cultural Representations of Jesus (3)
Christianity around the world has produced a myriad of Jesus images. This course explores some of the theological, ideological, pictorial and mass media representations of Jesus that have emerged from the cultural appropriations of the gospels. Special attention will be given to the hermeneutics behind the images as well as their ethical ramifications.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 759 - Formerly BIBST 189 - The Historical Jesus Quest(ion) (3)
A study of the problems of the historical Jesus;, representative lives of Jesus, and the evaluation of synoptic material as a source for historical knowledge of Jesus, as well as the methods, theoretical underpinnings, and ethical-theological interests of the modern quest for Jesus.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 690 - Formerly BIBST 190 - Dream Interpretation & Healing Dreams in the Biblical World (3)
Dreams play an important role in divine communication and involve also the divine gift of dream interpretation. One class of dreams of particular interest is Healing Dreams, rare in the Bible but prominent in the ancient world and the early Christian world. The course will survey the dreams and their interpretation in the ancient world, with special attention to healing dreams, as featured in the tradition of Aesculapius and parallel healing in the early Christian world.
BBST 691 - Formerly BIBST 191 - Struggling with Justice Alongside the Bible (3)
This course will examine texts throughout the Bible that provide systems for procedural and distributive justice, retributive responses to lack of justice, and hoped for restoration of the community through acts of reconciliation in response to violence. Beyond the Biblical text the course will examine the contemporary works of restorative justice, truth and reconciliation commissions, Jubilee and debt reduction and other forms of attempts to use the Bible in relationship to contemporary justice issues.
Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+747
BBST 703 - Formerly BIBST 703 - Readings in Hellenistic Texts: Ancient Novels--Jewish, Christian, Pagan (3)
A study of the historical emergence of the novel in the pluralistic cultural context of ancient Mediterranean peoples, double colonized by the culture of hellenism and the empire of Rome. Considering the effects of linguistic stylization and hybridization, irony and appropriation, the course tracks the novel's tendency to disrupt stable boundaries between places, times, and literary genres and explores how perceptions of difference--measured across ethnicity, class, gender, cultic affiliation--are sharpened even as identity is made more complex, malleable, and permeable.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 710 - Formerly BIBST 710 - Law and Ethics in and Beyond the Biblical Traditions (3)
A study of the legal materials of the Hebrew Bible and the ethical issues that emerge in the narratives and discourses of both testaments. The course includes attention to the ethics of biblical interpretation and the issues surrounding the use of the Bible as a resource for reflection on contemporary ethical issues.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 718 - Formerly BIBST 718 - The Bible After Postmodernism (3)
Explores the outer limits of contemporary biblical scholarship through immersion in some of the more innovative and challenging developments in the neighboring field of literacy studies, a field that, more than any other, has shown what postmodernism might mean in academic terms and through attempting, creatively and imaginatively, to bring these developments into dialogue with biblical studies.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 725 - Formerly BIBST 725 - Late Ancient Judaism (3)
This course will cover the history of Judaism from the Maccabean revolt through Late Antiquity, with emphasis on historiographic issues, e.g., strategies of periodizations, the usefulness of concepts such as "sectarianism" or "hellenization," the emergence of Rabbinism, and the "parting of the ways" between Christianity and Judaism.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111) Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+790
BBST 726 - Formerly BIBST 726 - Gender, Difference, and Election in Israel's Primary Story (3)
Re-examination of the primary story of Israel with attention to the concerns of "others" (women, children, aliens, slaves, the physically challenged, et al.), and exploration of how such a shift in emphasis might invite revisions of commonly held notions of covenant, salvation history, and election.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 727 - Formerly BIBST 727 - The Bible and the Body (3)
Examines biblical understandings and depictions of bodies, both human and divine, and explores how these representations have shaped, and might shape differently, theological and ethical responses to embodied existence. Special attention is given to such topics as gender, sexuality, violence, disease, infertility, physical challenge, and the problems involved in representing the body of God.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 728 - Formerly BIBST 728 - The Books of Samuel and the Politics of Representation (3)
A study of how the stories of Samuel, Saul, and David are told in the books of Samuel, with attention to the possible political and theological drives that may have shaped their narration in the Bible, and their subsequent representations in Western literature and art.
BBST 731 - Formerly BIBST 731 - Unveiling Revelation (3)
Brings the book of Revelation into dialogue with a variety of critical discourses, notably historical criticism, gender studies, postcolonial studies, and ecocriticism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 736 - Formerly BIBST 736 - Feminist Interpretations of the Gospels (3)
Surveys critical readings of the biblical texts proposed by feminist biblical scholars from around the world, paying special attention to the methodology they use, the role of their social location and ideological agendas, and the challenge they post to traditional readings of the Bible.
BBST 737 - Formerly BIBST 737 - The Bible, Colonialism, and Postcolonialism (3)
Using the resources of postcolonial studies, this course will examine selected texts from the Hebrew Bible and New Testament in relation to the perennial theme of empire, and the complex patterns of resistance and collusion that empire invariably elicits.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST 501 - Formerly BIBST 101 - or BIBST+111)
BBST 738 - Formerly BIBST 738 - Earliest Christianities (3)
This course explores the diversity of early Christian beginnings primarily through the writings of early Christians beyond the New Testament canon. Attention is given to diverse interpretations of Jesus and Judaism, the emergence of church structures and rituals, and the construction of the categories "orthodoxy" and "heresy" in the context of the struggle for authority and identity in the Roman Empire as well as at the intersections between historiography and contemporary religious and political debates.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 740 - Formerly BIBST 740 - Studies in Gnosticism (3)
An exploration of an elusive and eclectic ancient religious phenomenon through a reading of the heresiological sources and the Nag Hammadi corpus, in conjunction with recent scholarly literature.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202
BBST 741 - Formerly BIBST 741 - Texts an Topics in the Poetic Lit. of the Old Testament (3)
Studies in hebrew poetic style, wisdom, literature, Psalms, Lamentations, and Song of Songs. Subjects vary.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+153
BBST 744 - Formerly BIBST 744 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Christianity (3)
A seminar engaging both women's history and the history of cultural constructions of gender and sexuality through the readings of the New Testament and other Christian texts of Mediterranean antiquity, in combination with recent works of critical scholarship.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 751 - Formerly BIBST 751 - Wisdom in the Biblical World (3)
This course shall examine questions of the origin, development, and use of wisdom (as a theme and as personified) in the ancient world. The course shall briefly survey the history of scholarship on the wisdom tradition in three major periods (ancient Israelite, the Second Temple period, and the NT period, with focus on the Gospels). Greater attention will be given to the forms of wisdom (proverbial wisdom and parabolic narratives), and their relevance and contribution to the social, religious and political institutions (Family, Temple, Palace, Court, Prophecy) of the ancient world.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 752 - Formerly BIBST 752 - Myth and Society in the Acts of the Apostles (3)
If Acts is empirical historiography does creating a sub-category of religious history bring the reader any closer to understanding the identity formation and socio-political issues attendant on the role of angels, auditions, and visions. Angels, auditions, and visions are non-empirical events. This class explores the engagement of a mythic worldview with those characters and events in the Acts of the Apostles. Can a mythic worldview shed further light on non-empirical and empirical passages in Acts and on the relationship between communities of story teller in an ancient empire? In this class we will read selected passages in the Acts of the Apostles in order to begin answering these questions."
BBST 753 - Formerly BIBST 753 - Topics in Hebrew Bible (3)
Studies in the theological themes and paradigms of the Old Testament and in issues involved in theological interpretation. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated.
BBST 758 - Formerly BIBST 758 - Cultural Identity and the Book of Ruth (3)
The course will examine how theories on cultural identity (including discussions on literature, history, and ethnicity) are assumed, constructed, challenged, and re-imagined in the book of Ruth. With particular emphasis on ethnogenesis in ancient Israel, the course will interpret the book of Ruth as a product of the Persian period, but also expand the discussion to include contemporary interpretations of Ruth. Knowledge of Hebrew is encouraged but not required.
Signature of instructor required for registration.

CERT

CERT 301 - Formerly 301 - Faith Formation and Christian Living (3)
This course explores the biblical foundations of camp/retreat ministry and faith formation. It includes creative strategies for reaching out and welcoming persons of the twenty-first century into faith formation experiences; preparing intentional pathways for people to connect and deepen their relationship with God; effective methods for teaching core elements of Christian faith and discipleship; and providing participants and guests with opportunities to actively practice Christian discipleship with one another and all of God's creation. Strengthening the partnership between camp/retreat ministry, local congregations and conference ministries for long-term faith formation and developing spiritual leaders are important aspects of this course. The course will also cover the unique dynamics of Christian hospitality and faith formation when hosting culturally-diverse guests and groups and those that are not church-related.
Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+610
CERT 302 - Formerly 302 - The Theology and Ecology of Common Ground (3)
This course focuses on the role of camp/retreat ministry in inspiring and training spiritual leaders who shape society by engaging communities and congregations in ministries of earth care and social justice as an expression of holy common ground. Students will study biblical and theological perspectives on the link between faith in God and loving interdependence among people and of all creation. The course further gives a basic overview of key ecological principles and environmental concerns facing contemporary societies; studies the global social justice aspects of the ecological crisis; explores site operational practices that establish camp/retreat/conference centers and communities as Common Ground Centers where people practice Christian stewardship of creation, justice and mercy; and discusses strategies for training and involving both urban and rural leaders for Common Ground Ministries that reach out beyond the camp/retreat site or local congregation.
Same as: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+329
CERT 303 - Formerly 303 - The Ministry of Camp/Retreat Center Management (3)
This course provides an overview of Christian camp/retreat/conference center administration that includes: leading a mission-driven ministry; discerning shared visions and implementation; offering Christian hospitality and hosting guest groups; selecting and developing volunteer and paid staff; partnering with local churches, judicatory entities and other organizations; managing food service; maintaining grounds and facilities; providing risk management and health care; assuring the safety of children, youth, and vulnerable adults; creating and managing budgets; marketing and public relations; office management; establishing operational standards, procedures, and guidelines; strengthening boards and committees; spiritual nurture and renewal of resident staff; continuing education opportunities and more.
CERT 310 - Formerly 310 - Biblical Foundations of Camp/Retreat Ministry (2)
A survey course of the Bible with emphasis on its use as the foundation for ministry through camps and retreats. Concepts of Christians as caretakers, the stewardship of resources and global sustainability will inform the exploration of texts on creation, justice, covenant, and community.
Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+107
CERT 311 - Formerly 311 - Developing Christian Camp/Re treat Curriculum and Events (2)
This course will include hands-on experiences in creating and using activities, programs and curriculum for weekend retreats and overnight and day summer camping experiences. Participants will spend the first weekend in an adult retreat setting, focusing on retreat leadership and then spend three days in a summer camp/retreat setting focusing on children, youth and multi-age programs. It will also include educational theory for faith formation for all ages.
Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+635
CERT 313 - Formerly 313 - Developing Environmental Education and Resources (2)
No description is available for this course. Same as: CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+479
CERT 314 - Formerly 314 - Choosing Future Partnering w/ Eth. Leaders, Chur. & Comm. (2)
No description is available for this course. Same as: CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+480
CERT 315 - Formerly 315 - Fundraising and Financing of Camp/Retreat Ministries (2)
Charitable fundraising in support of the outdoor ministry programs of the various denominations is facing increasing challenges to the previous "routine" processes by which the extra-congregational services are funded and maintained. As congregational/parish allotments are reduced to provide funding for more and more local interests/needs, the amounts left to support broader service ministries are diminished. These ministries, then, are forced to develop their own support bases and "asking techniques" in order to provide both basic services and new initiatives. This course will offer a presentation of the basic tenets and concepts for charitable fundraising, an investigation of the requisite elements for a successful program and the specific techniques used in the design of a fundraising program for specific initiatives, the "asking" process, and the specific "ask." Since the course will provide several opportunities for the application of concepts to a specific case situation, students should come prepared with the descriptive details (financial, population, and program descriptions) of an independent ministry program to be used in these exercises.
Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+551
CERT 316 - Formerly 316 - Volunteer and Staff Hiring, Training and Supervision for Non-Profit Organizations (2-3)
This course will focus on the recruitment, interviewing, hiring, supervision, disciplining, evaluating and dismissal of paid and volunteer staff. In this interactive course, students will use their past experiences and present policies to develop new skills for their ministry of personnel management. The theological underpinnings of Christian leadership and role modeling will be woven into the course curriculum and classroom discussion.
Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+554

CHST - Formerly CHIST

CHST 502 - Formerly CHIST 202 - Church History 1 (3)
The history of Christianity, emphasizing its social and theological development, from the first century to the end of the 15th century.
Offered fall semester annually.
CHST 503 - Formerly CHIST 203 - Church History 2 (3)
A continuation of CHST - Formerly CHIST+202, beginning with the backgrounds to the Protestant Reformation and continuing to the 21st century, emphasizing social and institutional developments and theological traditions.
Offered spring semester annually.
CHST 614 - Formerly CHIST 214 - Poverty and Sanctity in Medieval Society (3)
High Medieval Europe witnessed two simultaneous revolutions: the birth of a commercial, proto-capitalist economy, and a popular religious awakening that drew on Biblical texts to mount a wide-ranging social critique of the emerging profit economy as well as established religious institutions. In this course students will read both modern historical accounts and also medieval documents about heretics, saints, lepers, and moneylenders in order to trace the origins of an urban commercial culture and to examine its critical observers, the voices of both the "orthodox" and "heretical" evangelical poverty movements of the eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. In considering both heretical and orthodox figures and beliefs as well as the changing conditions of profit-making and poverty, we shall explore medieval Europeans' notions of a rightly ordered society and the legacy left to us by their ideas about wealth and charity.Texts include biographies of such figures as Saints Francis,
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent.
CHST 615 - Formerly CHIST 215 - Studies in Gnosticism (3)
An exploration of an elusive and eclectic ancient religious phenomenon through a reading of the heresiological sources and the Nag Hammadi corpus, in conjunction with recent scholarly literature.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent
CHST 618 - Formerly CHIST 218 - The Thought of Augustine (3)
The thought of Augustine of Hippo based upon extensive readings in his major works.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 619 - Formerly CHIST 219 - Seminar in Medieval Studies (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 625 - Formerly CHIST 225 - Approaching the Celtic Christian Tradition (3)
This course offers students an introduction to the scholarly debates framing a Celtic past, and then studies the lived historical context of the early medieval period, the sacred literature (both prose and poetry), and the distinctive spiritual themes and the modern interpretation of the lived practice of Christianity among the Celtic-speaking peoples of medieval Europe (located in South-West Britain, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and Breton France). We shall consider the identifying category of the term Celtic, and we shall examine medieval texts, images, and the archaeology of the religious culture that emerged from the region, as well as modern scholarship and contemporary spiritual commentary on Celtic Christianity, in order to explore the origins and the relevance of this tradition for modern religious life.
CHST 626 - Formerly CHIST 226 - Poverty,Charity,& Communities in pre-modern Europe (3)
This course examines the history of poverty from Antiquity through the Middle Ages. We will consider the complex legacy of biblical notions of poverty for medieval people, as well as changing economic circumstances that resulted in changing notions of the identity of the poor; of the meaning and value of voluntary poverty and of almsgiving in pre-modern Europe; of community obligations to the most vulnerable members of society and community boundaries drawn by those obligations; and also notions of the role and function of radical indigence within the economy of salvation.
CHST 631 - Formerly CHIST 231 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Christianity (3)
A seminar engaging both women's history and the history of cultural constructions of gender and sexuality through the readings of the New Testament and other Christian texts of Mediterranean antiquity, in combination with recent works of critical scholarship.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 and CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or their equivalents.
CHST 634 - Formerly CHIST 234 - Readings in John Wesley (3)
An intensive study of Wesley's theology based on readings of his major works.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 635 - Formerly CHIST 235 - Women and Gender in the Middle Ages (3)
This course will concentrate on reading and writing the history of women and gender in the medieval European church. We will explore medieval texts and modern debates concerning the relationship between women and men, women and the church, and women and God within the medieval Christian tradition and also the larger social context within which this tradition evolved. One aim of this course is to consider and problematize the rubrics that modern historical studies typically bring to the study of women in the pre-modern past, including such notions as womens independence, power, agency, individuality, and subjectivity.
CHST 639 - Formerly CHIST 239 - Topics in Church History (3)
Topics vary and are announced at registration.
May be repeated for credit.
CHST 540 - Formerly CHIST 240 - A Short Course in United Methodist History, Doctrine and Polity (3)
A one-semester course that provides an understanding of the origins, history, and key issues and figures in the development of United Methodism in addition to enabling the student to understand the current polity of the course. This course is intended to fill the denominational requirements for deaconesses, deacons, and certification candidates. It does not fulfill the requirements for the M.Div. degree. Students in that track should take the two-semester CHST 560 - Formerly CHIST 260 ---261 sequence.
CHST 544 - Formerly CHIST 244 - Evangelism in the United Methodist Tradition (3)
This course will focus on an articulation of a definition of evangelism, a biblical basis for evangelism and a theology of evangelism. It will provide students with a familiarity and practical tools for helping both individuals and congregations engage in evangelism. This course fulfills the Division of Ordained Ministry requirement in evangelism for United Methodist students.
CHST 749 - Formerly CHIST 250 - America: One Nation, One God? (3)
Weaving historical insights and perspectives into current concerns about religion and national identity, this class focuses on major religious movements, personalities, and topics in the United States. It foregrounds the study of American Christian traditions, due to their historical influence, yet also gives some attention to non-Christian religions as well.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or its equivalent
CHST 653 - Formerly CHIST 253 - American Mystics (3)
This course examines the mystical writings of Americans from a time span of over two centuries, including Thomas Merton, John Muir, Rachel Carson, William James, Mother Ann Lee, Jemima Wilkinson, Rufus Jones, Howard Thurman, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Some of the questions that motivate our inquiry are: Who counts as a mystic, and why? And who gets to decide? What is the relationship between mystical contemplation and social action? Between mysticism and religious orthodoxies? How do we understand mystics in relation to their particular contexts? What spiritual and intellectual insights for our own time can we glean from reading mystics from another moment in time?
CHST 655 - Formerly CHIST 255 - God, Sex, and the Making of American Families (3)
This course examines how religious ideas and practices - particularly forms of Christianity - have influenced both private and public understandings of sex and family in the United States. Themes include the regulation of sex practices within and outside of marriage; the conflation of monogamous marriage with virtue and republican ideology; the meanings of domesticity; domesticity's shadows, including slavery and polygamy; and same-sex love and the emergence of modern sexual identities and practices.
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or equivalent.
CHST 656 - Formerly CHIST 256 - Jesus as Mother: The Medieval Spirituality of Maternality (3)
How is Christian religious life affected by perceiving Jesus as the mother of the faithful, and how did this portrayal of Jesus come into being? Medieval writers, both male and female, conceived of the maternality of Jesus as embodying feminine nurture in his spiritual and sacramental relationship with humankind. As historian Carolyn Bynum observes, "What writers in the high middle ages wished to say about Christ the savior who feeds the individual soul with his own blood was precisely and concisely said in the image of the nursing mother whose milk is her blood, offered to the child." This course will examine spiritual, theological, and devotional texts and images from the high and later middle ages that cast Jesus as a divine mother in order to explore the sources, the logic and the power of this understanding of God. Students may choose to write either a formal historical research paper or to develop tools based in medieval sources to support contemporary worship in order to
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202
CHST 560 - Formerly CHIST 260 - United Methodist History, Doctrine, and Polity I (3)
A study of origins, organization, outreach, religious life and key ideas, issues, events, and figures in the development of United Methodism. Aims at enabling the student 1) to understand and evaluate United Methodism in the light of its antecedent organizations and the broader context of those traditions historically related to the Methodist movement; and 2) to engage in responsible participation in the life and leadership of the United Methodist Church, to communicate effectively the tradition, and to participate perceptively in the ecumenical dialogue.
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 Fall semester annually.
CHST 561 - Formerly CHIST 261 - United Methodist History, Doctrine, and Polity II (3)
A continuation of CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+260 focusing on two concerns: 1) enabling the student to understand the nature and functioning of the United Methodist Church as the institutional expression of its historical development and theological assumptions, to affirm and explore the institutional structures as viable instruments for ministry, to understand the nature of authority and power as they relate to the United Methodist structure, and to contribute to the process of change in the church structure; 2) a study of the origins of the United Methodist doctrinal heritage in the theology of John Wesley, Philip Otterbein, and Jacob Albright; the development of that heritage in the Methodist, Evangelical, and United Brethren families of churches; and the distinctive marks of that heritage. (For United Methodist students, CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+260 and CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+261 together meet in full the United Methodist studies requirement for ordination.)
Offered spring semester annually.
CHST 762 - Formerly CHIST 262 - Topics in American Methodism (3)
An intensive study, based on original sources, of selected topics in the rise and development of American Methodism with a view toward defining the nature of the Methodist tradition.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 765 - Formerly CHIST 265 - Orthodoxy and Heresy in Late Antiquity (3)
Title: Orthodoxy and Heresy in Late Antiquity This doctoral seminar has three broad goals: to examine the development of discourses of orthodoxy and heresy and genres of heresiology as a means of negotiating unity and difference among ancient Christians; to explore diversities of belief and practice within ancient Christianity; and to analyze trends in contemporary historiography with regard to issues of orthodoxy and heresy, unity and difference. We will give particular attention to (constructions of) Gnosticism and Arianism and their orthodox counterparts, while also attending to other controversies such as the Origenist, Priscillianist, Pelagian, and Nestorian.
CHST 766 - Formerly CHIST 266 - The Minister in the MIrror (3)
Description pending.
CHST 768 - Formerly CHIST 268 - Race and American Christianity (3)
An intensive consideration of the power of race in American Christian cultures, with an emphasis on recent critical theories of race.
Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+268
CHST 769 - Formerly CHIST 269 - History of Missions from the Reform Era to the Twentieth Century (3)
Beginning with the emergence of mission energy within Roman Catholic religious societies in the sixteenth century, this course will follow the spread of Christianity from Europe and then England and North America, finishing with the twentieth-century mission impulse from the "missionized" Christian world.
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or its equivalent.
CHST 670 - Formerly CHIST 270 - Prayer,God,& the Body:Hist.& Cross Cultural Perspectives (3)
What are the historical origins of Christian practices and theories of prayer? How are these origins entwined with the histories of prayer in other ancient Mediterranean religious traditions? In our own time, how do Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists (among others) pray, and how do they understand their practices? What are the implications of particular kinds of prayer for theology, or of particular kinds of theology for prayer? To what extent and in what ways is prayer an embodied practice? How does prayer draw on material objects, and what is the role of sensory perception in prayer? Such questions will be considered in an exploratory seminar designed primarily for MDiv and MTS students, but open to others. Practice as well as theory will be incorporated into the class sessions: students may be asked not only to observe but also to try new things.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 OR EQUIVALENT
CHST 671 - Formerly CHIST 271 - Evangelism and Social Justice: The Social Gospel Movement in Global Perspective: 1880-2000. (3)
This course explores the various modalities of the Social Gospel movement (Romantic, Scientific Modernist, Evangelical, Socialist, etc.) and its ramifying influence in contemporary theology and church life. Of particular focus is the continuing global outreach and manifestation of the "social gospel" approach to evangelism vis a vis "personal gospel" strategies.
CHST 676 - Formerly CHIST 276 - History of Evangelism in US America (3)
This seminar explores the historical patterns of "great awakenings" in North America and their cultural and social impact on USAmerican Christianity. Particular attention will be given to the fluctuating relationship between religion and reform. Various contemporary "movements of the Spirit" will be examined and explored (e.g. charismatic and "third wave" evangelism, media religion and cyberchurch, seeker-sensitive churches, alternative worship, "The New Reformation/Reformission"), and contemporary practices of evangelism will be investigated in terms of their impact on postmodern cultures and emerging churches.
CHST 578 - Formerly CHIST 278 - Santa Christ: Ministry of Mission and Evangelism in Advent and Christmastide (3)
Over 10 percent of a pastor's time is spent in liturgical preparations and celebrations relating to Christmas. This course explores Christmas as a festival of memory, a festival of birth, an exchange ritual and a civil religious ritual. Particular emphasis given to the diverse expressions of Christmas in global Christianity, and the creative possibilities of missions and evangelism that can be generated from Advent to Christmastide.
CHST 779 - Formerly CHIST 279 - Revivalism and American Christianity (3)
This course will explore the ways in which scholars have understood the religious phenomenon known as "revival." Using both primary and secondary sources and moving from the early 18th century to the 20th, we will investigate this topic as a historiographical problem and look for new ways to talk about the elements of religious experience that have conventionally been marked as the framework for revivals.
CHST 682 - Formerly CHIST 282 - Is God On Our Side? Religion and U.S. Politics (3)
A study of the influences of religion, particularly Christian traditions, on political developments in the U.S from the early national period up to the present. Themes include the First Amendment and its litigation, Protestant projections of American manifest destiny, religious interventions in contested matters such as family life, the twentieth-century invention of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and the continuing quest to create a Christian America.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or its equivalent
CHST 787 - Formerly CHIST 287 - Readings in Late Antiquity: Creation,Creativity,and Beauty (3)
This doctoral seminar will explore late ancient Jewish, Christian, Gnostic, and Platonic texts that interpret creation in the wake of Genesis 1-3 and Plato's "Timaeus." Of particular interest will be the status of materiality and embodiment; gender and the erotic; beauty, art, and divine/human creativity. Where possible, we will work directly with the ancient languages.
Enrollment limit: 10
CHST 788 - Formerly CHIST 288 - Histories of Christianization in the Ancient and Med.World (3)
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent.
CHST 792 - Formerly CHIST 292 - Ancient Christologies (3)
A contextual exploration of varied ideas about Christ in the critical formative period from the first through the fifth centuries, ending with the "definitive" Christological formulations of the Council of Chalcedon (451). For students with particular interest in ancient Christianity and/or historical theology.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent.
CHST 798 - Formerly CHIST 298 - Late Ancient Judaism (3)
A seminar exploring the history of Judaism from the hellenistic to the early rabbinic periods, with particular attention to the place of Christianity in that history. Attention is given to selected historiographic issues as encountered in the reading of recent scholarly literature, complemented by readings of ancient texts.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 and CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or their equivalents. Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+725. Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+725.
CHST 734 - Formerly CHIST 734 - American Religion through Literature (3)
This seminar, intended for doctoral students, is a study of literary and popular works that illumine American religious life in various historical periods. Novels and short stories that criticize and/or satirize the role of clergy and the church will be a particular focus, but we will also take a look at literature that seeks to present new or alternative visions of spirituality. In addition to works of high literary value, such as Nathaniel Hawthornes A Scarlet Letter, we also study 19th century popular novels such as like Elizabeth Phelps The Gates Ajar and the recent bestseller Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins.
CHST 739 - Formerly CHIST 739 - Martyrdom and Asceticism in the Early Church (3)
An examination of martyrdom and asceticism, particularly at their points of intersection and overlap, that focuses on the production of the self as sufferer in ancient Christian martyrology and hagiography, with reference also to Jewish and pagan literatures.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 Same as: CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+294
CHST 750 - Formerly CHIST 750 - Confessions and Confession (3)
This seminar centers on Augustine's Confessions while also using the text to explore more broadly the character of confessional language, literature, ritual. The approach is interdisciplinary and readings potentially include not only Augustine's but also Rousseau's Confessions, as well as selections from the works of such theorists as Peter Brooks, Paul DeMan, Jacques Derrida.
Enrollment priority: Open to doctoral and advanced masters students. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 751 - Formerly CHIST 751 - Empire, Race, and Place: Theorizing Religious Identity in Context (3)
A cross-disciplinary doctoral seminar examining the formation and contestation of religious and ethnic identities in the context of empire. The questions pursued are broadly theoretical and the readings are interdisciplinary, including postcolonial theory, materialist analysis, critical race theory, and critical geography.
Signature of the Instructor required for registration.

CSOC - Formerly CHSOC

CSOC 501 - Formerly CHSOC 400 - Christian Ethics (3)
A systematic treatment of the central themes and issues of Christian ethics, with particular attention to the life of the Christian community and its place in the social order. Preferably to be taken by M.Div. students in the second year of study, and after CSOC - Formerly CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+401 and TPHL - Formerly TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301.
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301 and CSOC - Formerly CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+401. Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+400
CSOC 500 - Formerly CHSOC 401 - Religion and the Social Process (3)
An introduction to sociological thinking that combines conceptual and experiential content. Students become more sensitive to and informed about current social problems. Focuses on situations of oppression and uses "the view from below" as a key to the entire social process and, specifically, the role of the church in that process. To be taken by students in the M.Div. program in the first year of study. Offered second semester annually.
CHSOC 402 - Church and Community (3)
An exploration of the relationship between the congregation and the social environment through off-campus site visits and other direct experiential learning projects. Explores the nature of community in its multicultural variations through discussions of the mission and ministry of the congregation. The work of the pastor and empowered laity is at the center of the discussion. Recommended for M.Div. students in the second or third year of study.
CSOC 603 - Formerly CHSOC 403 - Sociology of Religion (3)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the sociological approach and methodology used in the study of religion and to give students a general sense of the immense variety of religious practice both locally and globally. The ultimate goal of the course is to encourage students to recognize and respect the diversity of ways in which people make religious sense of their worlds.
CSOC 604 - Formerly CHSOC 404 - Religion and Social Conflicts (3)
Assuming that the major social tensions and conflicts marking our lives deeply shape our religious choices, interpretations and behavior--and vice-versa: our religious heritage is a key resource in our dealing with the tensions and conflicts of our social environment--this course seeks to enhance our capacity for grasping, analyzing, and dealing with the interplay of religion and social conflicts in today's society from the perspective of the social sciences of religion, while bearing in mind key theological and pastoral concerns involved therein.
CSOC 616 - Formerly CHSOC 416 - Ministries in Non-Parish Settings (3)
An investigation of the possibilities and constraints of ministries in specialized settings (chaplaincies in the armed services, in hospitals, and nursing homes, in prisons, and on campuses; ministries in church boards and agencies, in overseas missions, and in administration of church-related institutions) and the role of the ordained person in "secular" settings, such as poverty programs, community agencies, journalism, and teaching.
CSOC 617 - Formerly CHSOC 417 - Women and Religion (3)
A review of anthropological, sociological, and psychological theory relating to women and, specifically, to women and religion. Combines theoretical readings with cross-cultural case studies designed to put social-scientific theory in conversation with the concrete life situations of specific women. Topics include women's spirituality and religious leadership; the social, political, and economic forces that shape their lives; as well as the relationship between religious imagery about women and the positions they, in fact, occupy in their larger societies.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CSOC 619 - Formerly CHSOC 419 - The Search for the Good Community (3)
The vision of the good community in England and America in the 19th and 20th centuries as that vision has emerged in utopias, cooperative movements, theocracies, and intentional communities. A review of various perspectives that bear upon the establishment of goals for human communities today.
CSOC 528 - Formerly CHSOC 428 - Topics in Church and Society (3)
An intensive study of selected problems and themes in contemporary sociology of religion having special significance for the church and its ministry.
Course may be repeated. Same as: GRC+101
CSOC 537 - Formerly CHSOC 437 - Ethics for Religious Professionals (3)
Emphasizes ethical dilemmas that arise for religious professionals. Explores issues related to confidentiality, sexual misconduct, personal boundaries, and accountability by religious professionals.
CSOC 542 - Formerly CHSOC 442 - Race,Ethics,and Women's Lives (3)
This course will explore women's ideas and strategies for addressing racism, health care, poverty, and other social problems. We will read short essays, including excerpts from biographies about Christian historical figures (U.S.), short stories with female protagonists, as well as articles by feminist and womanist Christian ethics scholars. In class discussions, we will compare the authors' varied discussions of the ethical visions, competing community loyalties, and complex moral choices of women with African American, Latina, Asian American, and Native American cultural backgrounds.
CSOC 543 - Formerly CHSOC 443 - The Religious Landscape of the United States (3)
This course is designed to acquaint the theological student with the general and particular landscape of contemporary American religion. Students read in-depth sociological portraits and broad overviews. Liberal and conservative Christianity is covered. In addition, students look at "sects and cults" in new religious movements and old religious movements such as Mormonism and Johovah's Witnesses. Primarily for theological students. Offering to be determined.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CSOC 644 - Formerly CHSOC 444 - Ethically Responding to Violence Against Women (3)
This course investigates the social and moral dimensions of intimate violence against women in the United States. The sources include biblical and theological literature, narrative accounts, and feminist social science analysis. This course examines the interwoven personal and political dimensions of intimate violence against women, and identifies practical, constructive responses for church leaders who work in local contexts.
Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+783
CSOC 645 - Formerly CHSOC 445 - Community Economic Realities and Ministry (3)
An examination of a range of economic crises that ministers often face in local communities and an exploration of useful church responses to those problems. This course examines the ethical role of the minister in interpreting economic realities to congregations, advocating specific policy solutions, and addressing some of the survival needs of members of the church and community.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CSOC 646 - Formerly CHSOC 446 - Ethics and Agency of Children and Youth (3)
Ethical questions relating to moral agency, theological anthropology, andcommunity obligation will be re-evaluated from the perspective of children and youth. Christian ethics has most often focused on adult subjects, thus missing critical insights about moral character and action. Similar to adults, children and youth engage current moral issues including the use of technology, , poverty, consumerism, sexuality, racism, and so on. This course asks how children exercise moral agency and grow in their moral capacity, as well as, how adults help or hinder child/youth development as they become capable, well-informed, and confident moral agents. While the course resources are multidisciplinary, the core methodologies and questions are situated in Christian social ethics.
CSOC 648 - Formerly CHSOC 448 - Medical and Healthcare Ethics (3)
This course explores methods and principles of medical ethics along with a series of pressing topics in the realms of medicine, healthcare, and bioethics. Major topics covered include health disparities, beginning and end of life decision-making, genetic and reproductive technologies, and caregiver-patient relationships. The theoretical frameworks employed include philosophical ethics and theological-ethical perspectives in Catholic and Protestant Christianity. This course should prove valuable for students pursuing careers in chaplaincy, healthcare fields, and ministry settings with significant health-related pastoral care needs.
CSOC 550 - Formerly CHSOC 450 - Religion and the Earth: (3)
Readings in spiritual, philosophical, feminist, scientific, and sociopolitical responses around the globe to the ecological crisis.
CSOC 551 - Formerly CHSOC 451 - Christianity and Ecology (3)
Examines what sociological and theological factors shape various Christian responses to ecological concerns. Surveys some of the historical, philosophical, socio-political and theological influences that have shaped the current planetary context and looks at an array of contemporary global religious ecological voices and emerging eco-theologies.
CSOC 561 - Formerly CHSOC 461 - Mass Incarceration, Economic J ustice, and Religious Activism (3)
This course aims at a critical analysis of mass incarceration principally in, but not limited to, the United States. Topics include: criminalization of urban youth, parenting from prison, immigration and incarceration, prison health care, community re-entry, privatization of prisons, and capital punishment. It will also examine the role of religious activism and ministry in support for inmates and their families and as resistance to the prison-industrial complex.
Repeatable. Prerequisite: . Offered every other Spring.
CSOC 576 - Formerly CHSOC 476 - Hispanic Religion and Culture: Church, State, and Immigration (3)
Introduction to history, culture, economics, and politics of the Hispanic presence in the United States. In addition to lectures, this course uses feature films, novels, and short stories by and about U.S. Hispanics and Latinas/os to stimulate reflection, discussion, and research on its subject matter. The religious dimension of the U.S. Latina/o experience is highlighted.
Course may be repeated. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+722
CSOC 579 - Formerly CHSOC 479 - Developing Environmental Education and Resources (3)
See CERT+313 for course description.
Same as: CERT+313
CSOC 580 - Formerly CHSOC 480 - Choosing Future Partnering w/ Eth. Leaders, Chur. & Comm. (3)
See CERT+314 for course description.
Same as: CERT+314
CSOC 681 - Formerly CHSOC 481 - Political Elections and Church Ministry (3)
This course will examine the role of Christian churches and faith in electoral politics. What role do they play? What role should they play? Resources for our discussion will range from ideas about church-state relations in western Christian ethics to the 2004 U.S. presidential election process. Topics include: values expressed in the media, preaching about politics, Christian politicians.
CSOC 582 - Formerly CHSOC 482 - Leadership Skills For Community Organization (3)
This course will assist participants to develop their power and leadership skills. Students will learn how to develop any congregation or voluntary organization through engaging in the fundamentals of community organizing.

CMFE - Formerly COMFE

COMFE 153 - JOB AND THE THEOLOGY OF SUFFERING
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 255 - GOD,SEX, AND THE MAKING OF AMERICAN FAMILIES
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 394 - INTERFAITH DIALOGUE
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 428 - TOPICS IN CHURCH AND SOCIETY
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 446 - ETHICS AND AGENCY OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 482 - LEADERSHIP SKILLS FOR COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 506 - THE CHURCH AT WORSHIP: PREACHING
No description is available for this course. This course is for Community Fellows Students only.
COMFE 550 - TOPICS IN PERFORMANCE AND PREACHING
No description is available for this course. This course is for Community Fellows Students only.
COMFE 587 - THE LANDSCAPE OF LOSS:
No description is available for this course. This course is for Community Fellows Students only.
COMFE 590 - SUFFERING,HOPE,AND THE BOOK OF JOB
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 620 - UNITED METHODIST WORSHIP: FORM AND FREEDOM
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 673 - SABBATH AS A SPIRITUAL PRACTICE
No description is available for this course.
COMFE 731 - MUSIC OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE
No description is available for this course.

CNCD - Formerly CONCD

CNCD 901 - Formerly CONCD 901 - A Systems Approach to Leading Congregations: Understanding the Congregation (3)
Promotes an articulation of the Biblical and theological rationale for congregational growth in the contemporary post-modern context. It uses family systems theory as a means to understand congregational dynamics as well as a systems approach to change. In addition to examining several change strategies, the participants will develop an audit of their congregation using the resources of Bill Easum's congregational audit. This audit will then be used by the participant to chart out a set of priorities based on the strengths, needs, and readiness of the congregation for change. Participants reflect critically on pastoral leadership and congregational context, offer professional feedback to one another, and give attention to a systems approach as a basis for planning and implementing parish ministry
CNCD 902 - Formerly CONCD 902 - Spiritual Formation For Congregational Vitality (3)
Leading congregations is demanding especially in the third millennium. As a result, congregational leaders need firm grounding in spirituality and leadership skills and the opportunity to network with others. This course will offer strategies to enhance pastoral directions, skills, and ways to engage the church community as "life-long learning" disciples. Bring your experience and ideas!
CNCD 903 - Formerly CONCD 903 - Church Growth Shaped By Community Outreach and Mission (3)
This course will explore the role of community and mission in church growth while taking the premise that we must first build community before we can build congregations. In what ways must the church build community and perform necessary outreach? What must the church do to sustain outreach into sustained church growth? Approaches for developing community and implementing mission outreach will be theologically and critically analyzed.
CNCD 910 - Formerly CONCD 910 - Ministerial Leadership and Congregational Dynamics (3)
Explores the challenge to leadership by unhealthy triangles found in pastoral relationships and congregational conflicts. In two three-day retreat sessions, students are exposed to Bowen Family Systems Theory as interpreted by Edwin Friedman and others. The course is taught by a qualified family therapy practitioner and/or pastoral psychotherapist. Students reflect on their personal dynamics of pastoral leadership through recollections from their "family of origin emotional process" and ways of relating in their current families and congregations. Case studies, brought to class by students, are discussed and interpreted.
CNCD 911 - Formerly CONCD 911 - Contextual Models of Church and Paradigms of Ministry (3)
Examines insights from secular and church sources in order to scrutinize the dynamics and leadership requirements to accomplish change. The course will involve two field trips to an urban and suburban church site, require an in-depth examination of a healthy effective church in the candidate's ministry area, and review the results of a congregational survey taken in each candidates setting of ministry. The focus for this session will be to assist the participant in beginning to formulate a strategy and approach to leading a congregation through change.
Offered as a week long intensive.
CNCD 913 - Formerly CONCD 913 - Change Leadership and Congregational Growth (3)
This course examines the pertinent organizational factors that require change in order for the congregation to realize growth across many spectrums including size, emotional health, and spiritual development. Principles from secular and church sources will be explored in order to glean best practices on how pastoral leaders can recognize the need for change, introduce change and assess the impact MORE........
CNCD 914 - Formerly CONCD 914 - PREACHING IN THE POSTMODERN AGE (3)
In this course we recognize that there has been a profound change in humankinds view and understanding of life and the world. As a result we have transitioned from a Modern World View to a Post Modern understanding of life and God. The challenge of preaching today is to communicate the truth of the historic faith as found in the Old and New Testaments in terms that are meaningful to todays Post Modern hearers.
CNCD 921 - Formerly CONCD 921 - A Systems Approach to Leading Congregations: Understanding the Context (3)
Explores the ministry context of the participant by a critical analysis of the demographics of the ministry area based on a Ministry Area Profile created by Percept. It will integrate the information from the congregational survey and congregation ministry audit together with the area demographics in order to begin the development of a strategy and plan for leading the congregation into the future. Each participant will carry out a Future Search Conference in his or her ministry context in order to develop five major goals for the future. The student will then begin to work through how, who, when, and what will be needed to accomplish these goals. Building on previous work in CNCD - Formerly CNCD - Formerly CONCD+901 and CNCD - Formerly CNCD - Formerly CONCD+911, each candidate will develop an 18 month timeline for their ministry that sets the focus for their project-thesis phase of their DMIN program.
CNCD 923 - Formerly CONCD 923 - Practical Theory in Context (3)
This course will examine the contexts, methods and purposes of practical theology which can be defined as theology "of the People, by the People, and for the People" of God. Through an examination of the recent cultural history of theology in America, an interpretation and criticism of Don Browning's classic Fundamental Practical Theology, and an exploration of other recent models of practical theology (including the student's own), participants will gain an understanding of the methodology. In class application of this methodology will help students shape and form projects that build-up "the people of God". The students will employ theological and ministerial skills to identify a problem, analyze it, and, in conjunction with an increased awareness of his/her context, use these skills to imagine possible and justifiable solutions to problems of how to be the people of God in an increasingly problematic world.
CNCD 971 - Formerly CONCD 971 - Theology and the Practice of Shalom (3)
This Doctor of Ministry intensive course focuses on the many nuances and facets of the inspiring Judeo-Christian-Muslim concept of Shalom/Salaam/Peace which can mean community well-being, health, harmony, wholeness, welfare, prosperity and peace as used by interpreters of Jeremiah 29: 7 in the Bible: Seek the shalom of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its shalom you will find your shalom. Together, we will develop a practical theology of asset-base community development through 1) an overview of the prophetic tradition in scripture; 2) reflecting on our own experience in community ministry, and 3) deep reading, discussion and applied learning of the topic.
CNCD 980 - Formerly CONCD 980 - Theological Methods for Minist ry (3)
Prepares students for the Professional Project and Thesis. Introduces research tools and methodologies appropriate for D.Min. projects. Assist sstudents in developing an initial Topic Outline for the professional project.

CRCL - Formerly CRCUL

CRCL 724 - Formerly CRCUL 724 - Cross-Cultural Pre-Departure Course (1)
This course, together with CRCL - Formerly CRCUL+725, fulfills the Master of Divinity requirement of a cross-cultural immersion experience. This ten-hour course introduces students to the religious, political, historical, economic, and social life of the culture chosen.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CRCL 725 - Formerly CRCUL 725 - Cross-Cultural Immersion Trip (2)
This two-credit course involves a two or three week trip abroad or to an appropriate domestic site for an immersion experience.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: CRCL - Formerly CRCUL+724

DMIN

DMIN 930 - Formerly 930 - Topics in Biblical Studies (3)
A study of issues in biblical studies and ministry. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 931 - Formerly 931 - Preaching with the Old Testament (3)
A study of the various genres of texts (e.g., Prophecy, Psalms, Narratives, and Wisdom texts) in the Old Testament and the appropriate way to utilize these texts in Christian preaching. Limited to 15 students.
DMIN 932 - Formerly 932 - Priest, Prophet, Sage (3)
A survey of the distinctive roles within ancient Israel of the priests, the prophets, and wise persons, with reference to their types of authority, their functions, and their ideologies; with continual reference to these roles as they relate to leadership within the church community.
DMIN 940 - Formerly 940 - Topics in Theological Studies (3)
A study of contemporary issues in theology and ministry. Topics vary; description to be determined by the D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 950 - Formerly 950 - Topics in Pastoral Theology (3)
A study of contemporary issues in pastoral theology and ministry. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 951 - Topics in Preaching (3)
Deals with the diversity in patterns of preaching.
DMIN 960 - Formerly 960 - Topics on Spirituality (3)
A study of contemporary issues in spirituality and ministry. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 961 - Formerly 961 - The Varieties of Spiritual Experience (3)
See Worship and Spirituality Concentration for course description
Same as: WSP+961
DMIN 962 - Figures in Spirituality (3)
See Worship and Spirituality Concentration for course description
Same as: WSP+962
DMIN 963 - Formerly 963 - Topics on Worship and the Arts (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
DMIN 970 - Formerly 970 - Themes in Ministry Intensive Options (3)
A study of contemporary issues in ministry in an intensive week-long seminar setting. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 971 - Formerly 971 - Drew@Ocean Grove (3)
A theological theme will be selected annually. Offered during Summer term.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 972 - Formerly 972 - Drew@St. Deiniol's (Wales) Pilgrimage (3)
See Worship and Spirituality Concentration for course description.
Same as: WSP+972
DMIN 973 - Formerly 973 - Drew@Lake Junaluska Seminar (3)
This course explores the understanding of the church as being on a mission where evangelism is the lifeblood of the church. Offered during JanTerm.
DMIN 980 - Formerly 980 - Theological Methods for Ministry (3)
Prepares the student for the Professional Project and Thesis. Introduces research tools and methodologies appropriate for D.Min. projects. Assists students in developing an initial Topic Outline for the professional project.
DMIN 981 - Formerly 981 - Topics in the Mission of the Church in the World (3)
A study of contemporary issues in ministry and the larger social context. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
DMIN 990 - Formerly 990 - Project Colloquium (3)
Fall colloquium for processing project proposals with the goal of getting the prospectus approved before the end of the semester. It usually occurs in two 3-days sessions in mid-September and mid-October, and usually requires revisions in November/December
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
DMIN 991 - Formerly 991 - DMin Professional Project (3)
Provides academic credit for project execution and requires a one-day "report back" session in the spring semester
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
DMIN 992 - Formerly 992 - Project and Thesis Research and Writing (3)
Continuation of work on project and thesis research and writing. "Report back" sessions are scheduled leading to approval of the first draft of the thesis.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
DMIN 993 - Formerly 993 - Project Thesis Completion and Exit Interview (3)
Work on writing the final draft of the paper and exit interview. "Report back" sessions are scheduled leading to approval of the thesis. Exit interviews are required for all students.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
DMIN 999 - Formerly 999 - DMIN TUTORIAL (3)
Available only with special permission. Permission includes agreement of a faculty instructor to supervise the tutorial project and approval of the arrangement by the Committee on Academic Standing. Tutorials are normally not available as a regular option.
Signature of Instructor or Chair of DMIN Area.

GRC

GRC 900 - The Theology and Ecology of Common Ground (3)
Focuses on the role of camp/retreat ministry in inspiring leaders who shape society by engaging communities and congregations in ministries of earth care and social justice as expressions of holy common ground. Students will study biblical and theological perspectives on the link between faith in God and loving interdependence among people and all of creation.
GRC 901 - Topics in Church and Society: (3)
An intensive study of selected problems and themes in contemporary sociology of religion having special significance for the church and its ministry. Course may be repeated. Sustainability / the ethics of sustainability have been selected for this term.
GRC 910 - Ministerial Leadership and Faith Formation (3)
Focuses on the role of the minister in inspiring and enabling faith formation. Students will study biblical and theological perspectives on the role of the clergy as model, guide and director of faith formation.
GRC 912 - Formerly 912 - Spiritual Found.For Sustainab and Ecological Initiatives (2)
This course focuses on spirituality as well as ecotheology. Students will engage in a process-oriented approach to spirituality and will explore Christianitys and other world religions treatments of ecological issues. Particular attention will be paid to Asian traditions and Buddhism.
GRC 914 - Themes in Ministry: Pilgrimage (3)
In 2004, the ecological pilgrimage was to Guatemala Theme and location for 2007: TBA
GRC 920 - Greening the Church: Christianity and Ecology (3)
An overview of the earth crisis and a critique of Christianity's historical relationship to the earth. Surveys biblical and theological resources for constructive responses to this crisis.
GRC 921 - Formerly 921 - ECOLOGY AND THEOLOGY OF COMMON GROUND (3)
This course focuses on the role of camp/retreat ministry in inspiring and training spiritual leaders who shape society by engaging communities and congregations in ministries of earth care and social justice as an expression of holy common ground. Students will study biblical and theological perspectives on the link between faith in God and loving interdependence among people and of all creation. The course further gives a basic overview of key ecological principles and environmental concerns facing contemporary societies; studies the global social justice aspects of the ecological crisis; explores site operational practices that establish camp/retreat/conference centers and communities as Common Ground Centers where people practice Christian stewardship of creation, justice and mercy; and discusses strategies for training and involving both urban and rural leaders for Common Ground Ministries that reach out beyond the camp/retreat site or local congregation.
GRC 930 - Biblical Foundations of Camp/Retreat Ministry (2)
An overview of the historical development and contemporary theological foundations of camp/retreat ministry. Surveys the historical, biblical and theological development of camp/retreat ministry.
GRC 950 - Practical Theology: Ministry of Camp/Retreat Center Management (2)
Focuses on the role of the camp/retreat leader as manager of camp program and resources in engaging communities and congregations in ministries at camp/retreat centers. Students will study biblical and theological perspectives on the link between faith in God, camp/retreat ministry and administration.
GRC 980 - Theological Methods for Ministry (2)
Prepares students for the Professional Project and Thesis. Introduces research tools and methodologies appropriate for D.Min. projects. Assists students in developing an initial topic outline for the professional project.

DMIN - Formerly HISP

HISP 900 - Hispanic Theology, Ethics, and Ministry in the U.S.A. (3)
Explores resources for ministry in the Hispanic North American context.
HISP 901 - Ministerial Leadership and Congregational Dynamics (3)
Explores the use of family systems theory in the analysis of the inner dynamics of the congregation and the pastor's leadership style.
HISP 902 - The Church in Social Context (3)
The Hispanic congregation as a social system in relation to the larger community and global context is explored.
DMIN 981 - Formerly HISP 981 - Topics in the Mission of the Hispanic Church (1)
A study of contemporary issues in ministry and the larger social context that effect the Hispanic congregation. Topics vary; description to be determined by the D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.

INTD - Formerly INTEC

INTEC 700 - Poststructural Theory and the Study of Religion (3)
This course will focus on the work of Jacques Derrida, best known as the "founder" of deconstruction, although the significance of his work extends far beyond that. We will range broadly in Derrida's writings and ponder their implications for religion, theology, biblical studies, ethics, and psychology. Additionally, students will have opportunity to dialogue with scholars in their own disciplines who are engaging Derridean theory, or related postmodern or postcolonial theory, from and for the specificity of those disciplines.
INTEC 900 - Interdisciplinary Colloquium
This interdisciplinary colloquium will offer views of significant issues in the scholarly study of religion. Faculty members will present materials and faculty and students will join in discussion. The course meets monthly and is required of all entering PhD students in the Graduate Division of Religion.
Course may be repeated.
INTEC 901 - TEACHING AND LEARNING COLLOQUY
This Colloquy will gather doctoral students beyond course work for 5 sessions on issues of teaching and learning. While this colloquy will appear on your transcript, no credits will be given. We will explore such topics as: philosophy of teaching, vocation/career and being a healthy teacher, alternative careers to higher education. The project of the colloquy will be to create a teaching portfolio which will include: sample syllabi, CV, letters of recommendation, statements of experience and practice, etc.. The aims of the colloquy are to practice reflecting on teaching and learning in ways that are sustainable for future work; to create habits and practices for student centered learning; to prepare for job search in and beyond higher education.
INTEC 902 - Augustine Across the Disciplines (3)
Centering on his Confessions, this doctoral seminar will approach Augustine's work from a variety of disciplinary perspectives--e.g., history, hermeneutics, literary criticism, philosophy, theology, liturgical studies, ethics. Students will be encouraged both to acquaint themselves with how Augustine has been engaged within their own discipline and to let themselves be challenged by other disciplinary voices.
Knowledge of Latin useful but not necessary. Signature of instructor required for registration.

INTR - Formerly INTER

INTER 690 - Research Skills I (1)
This course introduces MA students to advanced research skills in the areas of theology and religion. Students learn to identify appropriate on-line and printed resources for their research. They work on formulating scholarly questions appropriate for advanced work.
Required of MA students in the first year of course work. Offered fall semester annually.
INTER 691 - Research Skills II (1)
This course helps students further hone their ability to formulate productive scholarly questions, leading to the design of a topic for their MA thesis. Having identified a question, students then work to construct an appropriate bibliography for their thesis work.

INTT - Formerly INTRT

INTT 680 - Formerly INTRT 680 - Summer Internship (3-6)
Summer Internship. This course allows students to participate in either a 4-week (3 credits) or 8-week (6 credits) internship experience during the summer. Initial class meetings will be held in the late spring. During the summer there will be preparatory reading, site supervision, weekly blogging, online discussion, case study, and a ministry project. There will be a final class meeting in the fall. Interns will be expected to work 35 hours per week, including discussion time with site supervisor/mentor and in online class sessions with instructor who will do a site visit during the placement. Signature of instructor required.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
INTT 690 - Formerly INTRT 690 - Internship (1)
This course allows students to supplement their academic knowledge with hands-on experience through work in their field of study. Students will put theory into practice to gauge it effectiveness in real life settings. Students will be monitored by an adviser and complete a project relating to their internship. Given the intense nature of the Theological School programs, it is advised that students begin internships soon after arriving at Drew to obtain the maximum benefit. This course can be repeated with a new project. Successful completion of 3 credits of internship allows the student to receive Internship Certification, which is placed on the student's official transcript.
Signature of the Associate Dean of Contextual Learning Required for Registration. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.

LITS - Formerly LITST

LITST 712 - Christian Initiation (3)
A study of the rites of Christian initiation in their origins and historical development in both East and West, with theological reflection and discussion of pastoral practice in ecumenical perspective.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505
LITST 716 - Sacred Meals in the Household of Christ (3)
A study of the origins of Christianity's sacred meals, and the historical development, doctrinal perspectives, relationship of word and table, and contemporary rites and pastoral practice.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505
LITST 735 - Hymnology (3)
A study of the hymn in Christian worship, with emphasis on great hymn writers of the past, contemporary writers, and the composers of hymn tunes. Emphasizes the hymn traditions of America and Europe, but gives attention to the congregational music of African and Asian Christianity. Designed for graduate students and advanced theological students.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 751 - Sacramental Preaching (3)
This seminar will address two major aspects of preaching: 1) the theology of preaching as sacramental and 2) preaching on the sacraments. Ancient through post-modern preaching texts will be used to develop a genre of preaching understood as mystagogy, preaching that communicates the mysteries of Christian faith, and the means of grace through which believers encounter the real presence of Christ. Just as a pulpit/ambo is located between the font and the table, this course will focus on preaching as the intersection where "commonplace things are lifted up for holy use". Sermon preparation and evaluation is required as part of the course assignment.

LGON - Formerly LOGON

LGON 501 - Formerly LOGON 101 - TECHNOLOGY,ESCHATOLOGY,AND MINISTRY (3)
No description is available for this course.Internet Course
LGON 540 - Formerly LOGON 240 - A Short Course in United Meth. History, Doctrine & Polity (3)
A one semester course that provides an understanding of the origins, history, and key issues and figures in the development of United Methodism in addition to enabling the student to understand the current polity of the course. This course is intended to fill the denominational requirements for deaconesses, and certification candidates. It does not fulfill the requirement for the M Div degree. Students in that track should take the two semester CHST 560 - Formerly CHIST 260 --261 sequence.
LGON 544 - Formerly LOGON 244 - Evangelism in the Methodist Tradition (3)
See the description for CHST - Formerly CHIST+244.
LGON 560 - Formerly LOGON 260 - United Methodist History, Doctrine, and Polity I (3)
This is a year long online course that meets in full the United Methodist studies requirements for ordination.
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 OR EQUIVALENT.
LGON 561 - Formerly LOGON 261 - United Methodist History, Doctrine, and Polity II (3)
This is a year long online course that meets in full the United Methodist studies requirements for ordination.
LGON 597 - Formerly LOGON 297 - Church History: Ancient, Medieval, and Modern (3)
This Internet-based course surveys the history of Christianity from its ancient origins to the present. Emphasizing the traditions of Western Christianity, we attend to questions of Christian identity in the ancient Mediterranean, in medieval and early modern Europe, and, from the sixteenth century, in North America. Students develop skills of critical historical interpretation through engagement with a variety of primary texts: literary, visual, and aural. In twelve weekly modules, students encounter key themes and concepts in the history of Christianity, as they interact with online media and with the instructor and other students in web-based activities and discussions. Thematically, the course focuses on social and cultural backgrounds of Christian traditions, including; challenges presented by religious diversity; shifting practices of worship and scriptural interpretation; the spread of Christianity across diverse geographical and cultural terrains; womens roles in shaping Christianity; relations between churches and state institutions; the emergence of Protestant traditions; and Christian variety in U.S. American contexts.
The course is designed to meet the Church History requirement for Basic Graduate Theological Studies in the United Methodist Church.It does NOT meet the M. Div. church history requirement.
LGON 601 - Formerly LOGON 301 - Systematic Theology (3)
Systematic and constructive interpretations of central themes of Christian faith: God, Creation, Providence, Jesus Christ, humanity, evil, discipleship, Holy Spirit, church, eschatology. To be taken by M.Div. students in the first year of study.
Same as: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
LGON 527 - Formerly LOGON 527 - Family Stories and Ministry (3)
This course explores family loss and major tragedies (accidental death, suicide, alcoholism, mental health, homicide, adoption, sexual identity disclosure, and physical disability) as interpreted by a family member through personal (autobiographical) account. This course will engage in issues related to the experiences of the suffering endured by the author and other family members, their efforts in alleviating such suffering, the role of religious convictions in their coping with the suffering, and implications for pastoral care of families in pain.
LGON 735 - Formerly LOGON 735 - Hymnology (3)
A study of the hymn in Christian worship with emphasis on great hymn writers of the past, contemporary writers, and the composers of hymn tunes. Although the course emphasizes the hymn traditions of America and Europe, attention is given to the congregational music of African and Asian Christianity as well. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced theological students.
LGON 900 - Formerly LOGON 900 - Topics in Re-imagining Faith and Ministry (3)
A study of historical and theological foundations of ministry by means of particular interpretative frameworks. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. faculty.
Course may be repeated.
LGON 901 - Formerly LOGON 901 - Apocalyptic Theology and New Millennialism (3)
A survey of historic paradigm shifts, cultural turning points and major theological transitions in religion and society that can be interpreted eschatologically and epoch-alyptically as the end and/or beginning of an era (e.g., the shift from scroll to codex, from codex to printed page, and from word to sound/image). Requires critical and creative weekly online reflections on the theological implications of the present paradigm shift (technological revolution) for ministry in the Third Millennium. Promotes critical reflection on the ways in which technology and ministry intersect using historical and theological methods related to eschatology.
LGON 902 - Formerly LOGON 902 - American Jesus: Representing C hrist in U.S. Cultures (3)
This course is a study of how Jesus appears in literature, art, and film, and other popular media in America, examining how those representations have shifted and changed over the course of time. The course will give students an understanding of how books, film, and other media convey representations of the sacred. D.Min. students are expected to use insights from the course to produce a social-theological study of how people in their own congregations understand and imagine the figure of Jesus.
Course may be repeated.
LGON 903 - Formerly LOGON 903 - Sound Theology: Music as a Mar ker of Congregational Identity (3)
The course will give students an understanding of how music conveys representations of the sacred and communicates theological understanding. DMIN students are expected to use insights from the course to produce a social-theological study of how people in their own congregations and contexts understand and imagine the sacred through music.
LGON 910 - Formerly LOGON 910 - Ministerial Leadership in Postmodern Culture (3)
Exploration of new means of envisioning, planning and carrying out ministry in the contemporary setting. Topics vary, description to be determined by DMIN faculty.
LGON 911 - Formerly LOGON 911 - Christian Futuring: An Operator's Manual for the Future (3)
Provides a theological basis for pointing churches toward the future and provides an alternative model to church planning as strategic planning. Explores common stumbling blocks ministers and churches face as they move into the future. Provides an optimistic, postmodern "birthing" theology that requires church transformation rather than mere stylistic tinkering, and a practical "operator's" manual to the future.
LGON 912 - Formerly LOGON 912 - Preaching in a Postmodern Culture: Communicating with Contemporary Audiences (3)
Postmoderns do not "know" life like moderns "knew" the world. In postmodern culture, knowing proceeds through imaginative leaps, loops, and lurches that come to life almost holographically around performative metaphors. This course explores the abductive hermeneutic that all communicators to contemporary audiences need to claim and clarify. This abductive epistemology moves worship beyond the discussion over induction or deduction, over theory-based or data-oriented. Knowing is not linear movement either from (deduction) or towards (induction) propositions. We will review the multiple modes of cognition, and propose an EPIC methodology that moves preaching into more experiential, participatory, image-rich, and connective directions and dimensions.
LGON 920 - Formerly LOGON 920 - Models of a Future Church (3)
A study of contemporary issues in theology, ecclesiology and ministry. Topics vary; descriptions to be determined by D.Min. faculty.
Course may be repeated.
LGON 921 - Formerly LOGON 921 - Readings in Postmodern Ecclesiology (3)
A theological and sociological exploration of church leadership in the face of ambiguity and adversity. Confronts the challenge of "getting engaged" in high and low context societies, as well as the economies of design in modern vs. postmodern cultures. Includes an advance at a selected "new paradigm" teaching church with national profile that provides on-site learning in postmodern ecclesiology.
LGON 922 - Formerly LOGON 922 - The Next Church: Ministry in the New World (3)
A theological and sociological exploration of new models for ministry in the contemporary context. Students will explore how one meets the challenge of envisioning ministry in a contemporary mix of modern and postmodern cultures without succumbing to co-optation by those cultures. Includes an advance at a selected "new paradigm" teaching church with national profile that provides on-site learning in postmodern ecclesiology.
LGON 930 - Formerly LOGON 930 - Topics in Practical Theology and Postmodern Ministry (3)
A study of contemporary issues in theology and ministry. Topics vary; description to be determined by D.Min. office.
Course may be repeated.
LGON 931 - Formerly LOGON 931 - Practical Theology: Virtual Faith and Postmodern Ministry (3)
This course aims to explore the nature of virtualization as a feature of postmodern culture with regard to its implications on faith formation and Christian ministry in the new millennium. Students will be introduced to the recent discussions on virtualization, including a theory that the virtual is not the opposite of the real but a fecund and powerful mode of being that expands the process of creation and opens up the future. Understanding the virtual as a legitimate mode of being (along with the possible, the real, the actual), and virtualization as a change of identity displacing the center of ontological gravity of the object, this course seeks to develop ways of expressing and nurturing Christian formation in postmodern ministry.
LGON 932 - Formerly LOGON 932 - Thriving in the Digital Age through Collaborative Leader (3)
Recent cultural transitions are affecting not only how we work, learn, and socialize; they are affecting how we do ministry and nurture congregational community. Many congregations today consist not only of five generations, but three worldviews that reflect the influence of three major communication eras. This course addresses what is happening in today's congregations and why as we explore what it means when we have three worldviews, three sets of expectations, and three perspectives on what it means to belong and to participate. As we look at the collaborative approaches being introduced by the digital age, we will explore opportunities for congregational leaders to take advantage of these opportunities for leading their congregations in ministry. This course will give students the opportunity to develop: a) an understanding of the affects of the three communication eras on congregational life, and b) a leadership approach that will facilitate a shared vision among congregational sense of hope, purpose, and mission in the lives of congregational members.
LGON 980 - Formerly LOGON 980 - Theological Methods and Practice (3)
Building on the understanding of ministry in the postmodern context, the course will introduce students to relevant research methodologies and tools that may be employed in the Doctor of Ministry project. Students will engage in formulating their D.Min. project using their ministerial context. Framing the project theologically, students will begin to conceptualize the components of the project that will enable them to address the project focus.
LGON 990 - Formerly LOGON 990 - Project Colloquium (3)
Colloquium work on approval for the topic outline, then prospectus (which includes plans for the project and thesis). Development of topic outline for doctoral proposal online (September) followed by a two-day workshop on proposal development with faculty advisers (October), leading to a professional project and doctoral thesis. Online "report back" sessions and "cyber-chats" are scheduled each semester until graduation in May of third year.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
LGON 991 - Formerly LOGON 991 - DMin Professional Project (3)
Online Colloquium to aid in implementing and evaluating the project. Online "report back" sessions and "cyber-chats" are scheduled during the semester.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
LGON 992 - Formerly LOGON 992 - Project Thesis Research and Writing (3)
Continuation of work on project and thesis research and writing. Online "report back" sessions and "cyber-chats" are scheduled leading to approval of the first draft of the thesis.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
LGON 993 - Formerly LOGON 993 - Project Thesis Completion and Exit Interview (3)
Work on writing the final draft of the paper and exit interview Online "report back" sessions and "cyber-chats" are scheduled leading to approval of the thesis. Exit interviews are required for Online students. Students may meet with faculty via ISDN videoconferencing compatible with TANDBERG equipment or have the exit interview on campus.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.

MBS

MBS 901 - Formerly 901 - Psych.and Biblical Metaphors of Personal & Congregational.. (3)
This course will introduce, and explore theories that engender healthy self-care practices in both clergy and congregation. Biblical interpretation is a concomitant to that effort; we will explore dialogical methods of interpretation that are commensurate with the development of wholesome community mores.
MBS 910 - Formerly 910 - Clergy Health and Its Relationship with Congreg.Life (3)
The course will introduce students to methods of spiritual, and psychological self-care; and offer information and opportunity to discuss and apply the ramifications of clergy wellness to congregational life. The goals of the course are: To provide a summary introduction to the important issues involved in a consideration of "clergy self-care". To explore the relationship between our spiritual health and our mental and physical health. To discover and discuss the implications that the personal (i.e., psychological, physical, spiritual) functioning of the clergy has for her or his parish To introduce, explore and practice methods of spiritual formation practiced within traditions outside of Protestantism.
MBS 920 - Formerly 920 - Conflict,Anger,& Forgiveness: Working Through Loss & Diff. (3)
Christian community can be a powerful source of healing and wholeness or a destructive experience of brokenness. This course will explore the communal dynamics of conflict, anger and forgiveness as integral to Christian faith and spiritual growth. How does the pastor help the community of faith to transform experiences of loss and difference into occasions of redemption? Using insights from biblical and theological readings on community, readings from family systems theory and psychoanalysis, and group experiences in class, this course seeks to create a theology of conflict and forgiveness as well as to understand pastoral skills for the creation of healing community.
MBS 951 - Formerly 951 - Biblical Faith and Family Systems Theory (3)
Builds on the potential of the counseling relationship to bring together real life human stories with the redemptive stories of biblical faith. Engages students to develop skills in recognizing the repetitive, "stuck" intergenerational ingredients in family systems dynamics and congruencies with biblical concepts of sin and evil, obligation and legacy, captivity, and injustice. Encourages students to theologize as they build models for counseling practice. Challenges students to focus on strengths and resources of families and individuals and the facilitation of growth in mind-body-spirit wholeness. Stresses the sacramental nature of relationships and how counselors can facilitate empowerment in counselees through growth in self-understanding and liberation from oppressive social projections.
MBS 952 - Formerly 952 - Theories of Psychology (3)
Psychological theory is introduced through an in-depth presentation of Object Relations Theory. The origin and development of Object Relations Theory and its clinical applications to individual, couple, and family counseling will be covered. Other useful theories of counseling psychology, such as Erikson Ego-Psychology, Narrative, and Internal Family Systems psychologies, will be introduced and contrasted in an effort to better understand the relationship of the self to self, others, and the created world. Course addresses the emerging critique of psychology as "mere science" and the need to recognize and validate other sources of truth and explores the ways in which gender, race, socio-economic, and other features of the social context impact pastoral care and counseling.
MBS 953 - Formerly 953 - Theories of Family Therapy (3)
Details in depth Bowen Family Systems Theory and its applications to individual, couple, family counseling and institutional consultation as an introduction to theories of family therapy. Covers other family systems theories such as Structural (Minuchin), Strategic (Madanes), Symbolic-Experiential (Whitaker), Contextual (Bosormenyi-Nagy), and Narrative (Freedman and Combs). Notes common origins and suggested clinical applications and integrations of the theories. Encourages theological critique and integrative thinking.
MBS 954 - Formerly 954 - Ethnicity in Family Therapy Assessment (3)
Details in depth Bowen Family Systems Theory and its applications to individual, couple, family counseling and institutional consultation as an introduction to theories of family therapy. Covers other family systems theories such as Structural (Minuchin), Strategic (Madanes), Symbolic-Experiential (Whitaker), Contextual (Bosormenyi-Nagy), and Narrative (Freedman and Combs). Notes common origins and suggested clinical applications and integrations of the theories. Encourages theological critique and integrative thinking.
MBS 955 - Formerly 955 - Counseling Skills in Clinical Practice (3)
Engages students in learning and application of counseling skills to actual counseling cases from their work settings and experiencing team case consultation under professional supervision aimed at sharpening skills in establishing rapport, listening, interviewing, handling transference and countertransference, assessment, diagnosis, clinical reasoning, intervention, and case management within a well-defined theological and theoretical framework. Explores how to recognize severe mental illness, use protocols for referral and evaluation, and collaborate with physicians and clinical consultants for a multidisciplinary approach.
MBS 956 - Formerly 956 - Family Systems Interventions with Couples, Families, Groups, and Social Institutions (3)
Develops skills in systems assessment of the relationship functioning of families, groups, and social institutions. Introduces methods for data-gathering through charting, genograms, and interviewing. Presents tools for assessing relationship functioning, tracking issues, recognizing triangles, cutoffs, power imbalances and injustices, etc., and planning appropriate interventions. Identifies intergenerational transmission, myths and legacies, recursive patterns, script construction, and rituals and rites of passage. Structures counseling and consultation skill practices through training films, role play, and case development.
MBS 957 - Formerly 957 - Family Crisis (3)
Presents a spectrum of literature on personal, couple, and family crisis and models for crisis intervention. Investigates the utility of personal life crises as a vehicle for understanding the emotional dynamics of crisis and enhancing crisis intervention skills. Employs casework on crisis counseling.
MBS 958 - Formerly 958 - Gender, Sexuality and Wholeness (3)
Explores sexuality as a metaphor that unites physical, psychological, social, religious and political aspects of human life in contrast to the traditional perspective that understood the five aspects of sexuality as separate and distinct modes of analysis. Examines sexuality as a fluid layering of interaction between those elements for each individual within their social context. Course explores gender, sexuality, and wholeness from the perspective of object relations theory, cultural psychoanalysis, and process theology.
MBS 959 - Formerly 959 - Use of Self and Countertransference (3)
Illustrates that counseling depends not only on knowledge of theory but also the counselor's ability to use her or his own psyche and spirit to understand the psychological, spiritual, and systemic dynamics involving another person or group. Explores different perspectives on using the couselor's reactions to the dynamics in a given situation as a tool for effective interventions.
MBS 960 - Formerly 960 - Addiction and Recovery Counseling (3)
Using substance abuse as the primary clinical example of addiction, examines the nature of addiction as a disease and how recovery from the disease is and must be a spiritual, as well as a psychological process. Studies in-depth the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous as a spiritual growth process and how these steps are compatible with traditional Christian spirituality. Employs didactic presentations, group discussions, and clinical presentations, group discussions, and clinical experiences with recovering persons who share the spirituality of their experience, strength, and hope. Explores family/systemic dimensions of addiction.
MBS 980 - Formerly 980 - Theories and Methods for Evaluating Change in Pastoral Care and Counseling (3)
This course on social science research methodologies is designed to help students plan for their final projects. It introduces theories and methods for evaluating change that occurs as a result of pastoral care and counseling interventions. Quasi-experimental design and unobtrusive methods are utilized to measure this change. Students learn to enable people in their ministry setting to become more reflective of psychosocial and spiritual dynamics, understanding how values and history shape immediate decisions.

MTS

MTS 675 - Formerly 675 - M.T.S. Capstone Project (3)
All M.T.S. students are required to complete a Capstone Project in their last (or next to last) semester of residence. Each M.T.S. student will consult with his/her advisor during the fall semester to choose a topic/project that would be summative in nature. Guidelines for the project are available from the student's adviser.
Signature of the Associate Dean of Contextual Learning is required for registration.

PSTH - Formerly PASTH

PSTH 501 - Formerly PASTH 501A - Pastoral Formation (1)
Description pending.
PSTH 503 - Formerly PASTH 503 - Introduction to Educational Ministry (3)
This first-level course is intended to provide the learner with an introduction to theory and methodology of Christian Education from a liberation perspective. Christian education, for the purposes of this course, is the theory and practice (praxis or art) of nurturing faith. This course leans heavily upon the development of critical thinking skills. With the permission of the professor, one elective course may be taken before the Introduction to Educational Ministry. The elective course cannot be substituted for the introductory course.
Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
PSTH 504 - Formerly PASTH 504 - Introduction to Pastoral Care (3)
This course is an introduction to the ministry of pastoral care and counseling, with an emphasis on the helping relationship, theological understandings of pastoral care, pastoral uses of psychotherapeutic theories and strategies for change, various forms of pastoral care and counseling, and various cultural contexts.
PSTH 505 - Formerly PASTH 505 - The Church at Worship: Worship (3)
This course is a required, semester-long course for M.Div. and an elective for MA in Min candidates normally offered during the second year of study at Drew. This course is part of an interdisciplinary approach to worship, ritual, prayer, and music. Its primary goal is to provide historical, theological, and practical resources for leading public worship. It will include a brief history of hymnody as well as the role of music in emerging forms of worship. Students will gain new perspectives on their own worship tradition by gaining a broader understanding of historical traditions and contemporary expressions of Christian worship in an ecumenical context.
Enrollment priority: Course is limited to students who are presently enrolled in or have completed Supervised Ministry.
PSTH 506 - Formerly PASTH 506 - The Church at Worship: Preaching (3)
This course is a required course for M. Div. students and an elective for MTS. The course is designed to be an introductory examination of the place of preaching in the liturgical life of the church and a prerequisite for other Homiletics offerings. Students will explore both the person and the practice of preaching. Students will learn, listen, and practice the task of preaching in peer groups for engagement and feedback. Sermons will be presented in required preaching precept groups. Students will explore the relationship of preaching to both liturgy and music.
This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: The prerequisites are BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 and BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111. It is strongly recommended that students take PSTH - Formerly PASTH+548 prior to taking this course. Offered every semester.
PSTH 521 - Formerly PASTH 521 - Supervised Ministry Practice (3)
Normally taken by full time M.Div. candidates in the second year. Related to a setting of ministry throughout the year. Weekly seminars on campus focusing on issues and problems of ministry, particularly the relationship between one's own theological understanding and style of ministry. An evaluation session in the ministry setting at the end of each semester provides students with feedback and general evaluation of their work in ministry.
Students are expected to have completed 24 credits before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+521
PSTH 655 - Formerly PASTH 527 - Family Stories and History (3)
This course explores family loss and major tragedies (accidental death, suicide, alcoholism, mental illness, homicide, adoption, sexual identity disclosure, and physical disability) as interpreted by a family member through personal (autobiographical) account. The course will engage in issues related to the experiences of the suffering endured by the author and other family members, their efforts in alleviating such suffering, the role of religious convictions in their coping with the suffering, and implications for pastoral care of families in pain.
PSTH 606 - Formerly PASTH 528 - Festivals of Preaching (2)
These intensive off-site courses are primarily designed for STM, and MAM students interested in preaching as their concentration. Each course will be designed around the key conferences in preaching, with the readings of the keynote preachers/speakers forming the core of the curriculum. Drew faculty will be the faculty of record in these courses.
PSTH 672 - Formerly PASTH 533 - Ritual of Our Lives:Learning for Everyday Struggles of Fait (3)
We learn faith by doing. Participation in the rituals of faith mark and give meaning to the transitions and passages of our life cycle, e.g., baptisms, weddings, funerals, birthday parties, bachelor parties, family reunions, etc. This course aims to provide theological and religious education resources for deeper understanding of the ways rituals, rites of passage, ritualized behaviors, and religious experience shape, form, inform and transform who we are. This interdisciplinary course gives attention to the conversations of ritual theory and practice in religious education and liturgical studies.
PSTH 607 - Formerly PASTH 534 - Advanced Preaching: A Matter of Life and Death (3)
This course will be a preaching intensive course designed for students who will have regular preaching responsibilities. . Students will be expected to preach and present sermons weekly. Students planning to preach a Senior Sermon are especially encouraged to enroll.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+506
PSTH 609 - Formerly PASTH 536 - Imaginative Biblical Preaching (3)
A seminar-practicum on the role of the imagination in the exegesis of Scripture and the proclamation of the Gospel. Attention to the parables of Jesus and to the place in preaching of image and narrative.
PSTH 610 - Formerly PASTH 537 - Proclamation: The Word in Liturgy (3)
The origin and aim of preaching are found in the assembled community, especially in its sacramental life in the context of liturgical time. This course will reflect theologically on the liturgical situation of preaching and exegete texts for preaching in Lent, Holy Week, and Eastertide. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505. Offered in spring of odd-numbered years.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505. A graduate course open to seminarians. Same as: LITS - Formerly LITST+720
PSTH 611 - Formerly PASTH 538 - Preaching the Synoptic Gospels (3)
A seminar-practicum on preaching the synoptic gospels. This course will focus especially on exegetical approaches to the gospels and the relationships of exegesis to preaching.
Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 or PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505 or PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+506)
PSTH 539 - Formerly PASTH 539 - Topics in Institutional Chaplaincy (3)
This series will explore the nature of ministry in specialized settings with a particular focus on issues of authority, identity, and pluralism in institutional chaplaincy.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 612 - Formerly PASTH 540 - Contemporary Preaching (3)
New directions, leading issues, and viable models in today's pulpit. Readings in the most recent literature and listening session on outstanding preachers.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505 and PSTH - Formerly PSTH - Formerly PASTH+506
PSTH 613 - Formerly PASTH 542 - Topics in Preaching and Worship (3)
This course will examine various topics in the field of preaching/homiletics. Specific topics will be described as they are offered.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 614 - Formerly PASTH 544 - Narrative Preaching (3)
This seminar will engage in the study of the stories and structures of narrative preaching. The major emphases of narrative theology (life story, canonical stories, and community story) will be explored through the work of key scholars/preachers in the field. The course will also include consideration of the role of testimony in forming individual and communal identify in faith communities strongly shaped by oral tradition. Biblical narrative, story telling, and sermon construction will be part of the course assignments.
PSTH 548 - Formerly PASTH 548 - Body and Voice for Preaching (1)
This practical course concentrates on building communication skills including individual help to improve and take care of your vocal instrument and build stamina as a speaker. Much class time is devoted to preparation for and practice of extemporaneous speaking. Methods explored will also improve scripted and impromptu speeches and include story-telling techniques and use of humor. In addition, each student works on reading more effectively by re-animating the Biblical text to express the message with clarity, power and effectiveness.
PSTH 549A - Formerly PASTH 549A - Communication Skills for Liturgical Settings: Reading of the Word (1)
Focus of instruction is on clarity of expression and effective delivery of the Scriptural text. Emphasis placed on the mastery of English pronunciation, intonation, and rhythm. Students meet with instructor, individually, for a 50-minute class period, once per week. Student readings are videotaped for purposes of analysis and assessment.
Note: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+549 A, B, C, D, are offered every semester for non-native speakers of English only. Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 549B - Formerly PASTH 549B - Communication Skills for Liturgical Settings: Presentation of the Liturgical Text (1)
Through the creation of their own liturgical text in the form of homilies, meditations, or sermons, students develop skills and strategies for effective oral presentation. Student presentations are videotaped for purposes of analysis and assessment. Students meet with instructor, individually, for a 50-minute class period, once per week.
Note: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+549 A, B, C are offered every semester for non-native speakers of English only. Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 549C - Formerly PASTH 549C - Communication Skills for Liturgical Settings: Advanced Presentation of the Liturgical Text (1)
Through the creation of various forms of liturgical texts to be used for a variety of liturgical tasks, students develop skills and strategies for effective oral presentation with minimal reliance on the written text. Student presentations are videotaped for purposes of analysis and assessment. Students meet with instructor, individually, for a 60-minute class period, once per week.
Note: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+549 A, B, C are offered every semester for non-native speakers of English only. Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 549D - Formerly PASTH 549D - Communication Skills for Liturgical Settings: Leadership Dynamics (1)
The focus of this class is the development of skills and strategies that enable students to effectively deliver power point presentations as well as facilitate panel presentations, group meetings, and question and answer sessions that demand discussion and debate. Students will be expected to lead simulated group sessions as well as participate in the sessions.
Meets: Once per week for a 75 minute period.
PSTH 615 - Formerly PASTH 550 - Topics in Performance and Preaching (3)
This seminar seeks an understanding of the nature and power of performance art and preaching as an illumination of sacred texts, human bodies, and cultural identities.
Enrollment limit: 12 students. Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 551 - Formerly PASTH 551 - Fundraising and Financing of Camp/Retreat Ministries (3)
See CERT+315 for course description.
Same as: CERT+315
PSTH 620 - Formerly PASTH 553 - Spirituality and Preaching (3)
This class is designed to assist students in learning, cultivating, enriching, and integrating the essentials for Christian spirituality with their preaching vocations. The history and theology of the connection between spirituality and preaching; how biblical exegesis for preaching impacts and is impacted by spirituality; and ways in which spirituality shapes and is shaped by homiletical style, design, form and diversity are components that will be introduced. The course seeks to increase the student's learning through multiple methods: class discussion of readings and lectures, the student's preparation and delivery of several sermons, instructor and peer evaluations of the student's sermons, extemporaneous exercises, written assignments, activities centered around particular Christian spiritual disciplines and analysis of published and videotaped sermons of well known professional clergy.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+506.
PSTH 554 - Formerly PASTH 554 - Volunteer and Staff Hiring, Training and Supervision for Nonprofit Organizations (3)
See CERT+316 for course description.
Same as: CERT+316
PSTH 616 - Formerly PASTH 555 - Black Preaching (3)
This course will examine the rich tradition of Black Preaching in America, tracing its history and development from the invisible church of antebellum south, through the berthing of historically Black Denominations to the present. Special attention will be given to how Black preaching and preachers have made significant contributions to the shaping of both the American religious identity and socio-political life.
PSTH 556 - Formerly PASTH 556 - Church Music of the USA (3)
This course will examine both historical and current practices in church music in the United States. The course will place a special emphasis on the contrasting musical cultures of rural and urban churches, European and indigenous styles, and African American blends of African and Euro-American musical styles. Each student will create a profile of the music ministry of one particular church, examining church records and bulletins to establish a history of music ministers and organists, hymnals, choirs, and other aspects of church music programs.
PSTH 558 - Formerly PASTH 558 - The History of African American Church Music (3)
The History of African American Church Music is an elective, three credit course designed to understand the historical and socio-political context of the African American Church, learn and appreciate the music of the Black Church experience, and gain insight in came into how this music has been used to resist oppression and empower African Americans.
PSTH 559 - Formerly PASTH 559 - Worship and Music in the Emerging Church (3)
Worship & Music in the Emerging Church is an elective, three credit-one semester course which provides an historical and theological framework for understanding the emerging church phenomenon and offers practical resources for the leading of emerging worship experiences.
PSTH 561 - Formerly PASTH 561 - General Conference of the United Methodist Church (3)
This course is held every four years in conjunction with the General Conference of the United Methodist Church. Students meet a few times at Drew to prepare for the conference and then attend the full two-week conference, meeting with students from other United Methodist seminaries for class each day.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 617 - Formerly PASTH 566 - The Arts and Liturgy (1-3)
A seminar-practicum aimed at incorporating the arts into the worship life of congregations, Topics include the liturgical arts such as dance, the visual arts, architecture, music in relationship to liturgical theology, and practice of liturgy.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: LITS - Formerly LITST+736
PSTH 559 - Formerly PASTH 569 - Worship & Music in the Emerging Church (3)
Worship & Music in the Emerging Church is an elective, three credit-one semester course which provides an historical and theological framework for understanding the emerging church phenomenon and offers practical resources for the leading of emerging worship experiences.
PSTH 618 - Formerly PASTH 570 - Practicum on the Pastoral Offices (3)
Hands-on instruction for officiating at baptism, Holy Communion, marriage, and burial.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505
PSTH 574 - Formerly PASTH 574 - Topics in Evangelism (3)
Topics will be varied and will be determined before registration.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 575 - Formerly PASTH 575 - Seminary Choir (1)
The study and performance of a wide variety of music from the Baroque, Renaissance, and classical periods to avant-garde works, including jazz and contemporary folk-rock. An opportunity for voice training and the development of musical abilities.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. May be repeated for credit up to four credits. Offered every fall and spring semester.
PSTH 581 - Formerly PASTH 581 - Topics in Spirituality (3)
An introduction to Christian spirituality and its biblical/historical roots. Students seek to develop a critical assessment of spiritual formation in different Christian traditions. Encourages students to integrate their intellectual analysis of spiritual traditions with a personal involvement in the spiritual practices and disciplines appropriate to their needs and vocations.
Course topics in the area of spirituality will be announced at registration. May be repeated.
PSTH 642 - Formerly PASTH 583 - Counseling with Black Families (3)
Discusses contemporary theories of black families and identifies the major parameters affecting the quality of interpersonal relationships. Application of this viewpoint is made to understand the implications for counceling relationships with black families.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 643 - Formerly PASTH 584 - Pastoral Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)
Clinical case studies in pastoral counseling are presented and examined within a psychotherapeutic framework with particular attention to clinical evaluation, the therapeutic relationship and process, religious issues, and the resources of religion in the practice of pastoral counseling.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 644 - Formerly PASTH 585 - Marriage and Family Counseling (3)
An emphasis on family life, as conceptualized by the various schools of family therapy that have come into existence in the past two decades. In addition to reviewing the field, the course will rely largely on clinical material to illustrate pastoral and therapeutic intervention. This experience may increase the pastor's understanding and involvement in his or her own family.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 645 - Formerly PASTH 586 - Trauma and Crisis Intervention (3)
Crisis ministry is compassionate Christian response to individuals and communities in critical situations (stress, trauma, abuse, addiction, homelessness, AIDS, sickness, and death). Appropriate pastoral care includes crisis intervention and recovery and empowerment strategies. This course seeks to apply biblical values and psychological principles to at least three critical situations: responding to 1) inner city/urban problems, 2) people with AIDS and the terminally ill, 3) survivors of trauma and abuse.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 646 - Formerly PASTH 587 - The Landscape of Loss: Pastoral Care in Situations of Death, Dying, and Grief (3)
Through readings, lectures, films, interviews, and discussion, students study psychological, cultural, and religious dimensions of the experiences of death, dying, and grief. The focus is on understanding these dimensions in order to minister effectively to persons in need. Emphasis is on group discussions, since effective ministry requires that the minister be open to different ways of experiencing these realities.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+504 or successful completion of Clinical Pastoral Education Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+587
PSTH 647 - Formerly PASTH 588 - Erikson, Human Development, and Religion (3)
This course explores Erik H. Erikson's work and the implications of his life cycle theory for religion. It further engages in the dialogue with the work of James Fowler exploring a developmental approach to religion. Additional thinkers included are Robert C. Fuller, Donald Capps, Daniel J. Levinson, and Mary Belenky.
Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+768
PSTH 648 - Formerly PASTH 589 - Topics in Pastoral Care (3)
This course will focus on a specific approach or aspect of pastoral care. Topics vary with each offering.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 649 - Formerly PASTH 590 - Suffering,Hope,and the Book of Job (3)
This course examines the Book of Job and its implications for pastoral care and such issues as shame, depression, grief, and hope. The course will involve pastoral counseling method based on Heinz Kohut's psychology of the self and ethical understanding of Diana Fritz Cates.
PSTH 650 - Formerly PASTH 591 - Ministry in the Black Church (3)
An examination of the major issues in providing pastoral care and ministerial service to black congregations. The first part of the course is devoted to discussing the major social/psychological issues confronting African-Americans and the ways that ministers can facilitate personal growth. The second part of the course focuses on how congregations function as a group and on styles of leadership that contribute to congregational development.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 594 - Formerly PASTH 595A - Clinical Pastoral Education (6)
The accredited training of the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education can be taken at a general hospital, mental hospital, or correctional institution. Requires 12 weeks of residence. The student undertakes directed interviewing and counseling under supervision of the chaplain of the institution where the training takes place. By arrangement. Normally taken during the summer session. With approval of the director of supervised ministry, up to three credits are applicable toward the requirement in Supervised Ministry (PSTH 521 - Formerly PASTH 521 -, 522).
PSTH 595 - Formerly PASTH 595B - Clinical Pastoral Education (6)
Normally offered on a full-time basis, although special arrangements allow offering this course on a part-time basis over the academic year. Students are expected to spend two full days per week throughout the academic year at the training center. One of the two days involves group meetings for all student participants; the other day is arranged on an individual basis with each student. Credit is given for the course only after completion of the full academic year; no credit is given on a single semester basis. With approval of the director of supervised ministry, up to three credits are applicable toward the requirement in Supervised Ministry (PSTH 521 - Formerly PASTH 521 -, 522).
PSTH 596 - Formerly PASTH 596 - Reel to Real: Race, Sex, and Class at the Movies (3)
Movies, though designed for entertainment, are vehicles for learning. Movies make us think, feel, and at times, they have the power to transform our thinking. Film is a superb cultural text for talking about the convergence of race, sex, and class. This course will examine ways in which film teaches its audience. As cultural critics, (not film critics), we will look at the way movies depict issues of race, sex, and class.
Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+767
PSTH 651 - Formerly PASTH 597 - Ministry, Sexuality and Professional Ethics (3)
A study of the theological and psychological foundations of healthy sexuality and ministry. The course will address the following issues: How does the minister engage in nurturing and healing? What are the dynamics of sexual brokenness and destructiveness? How do these dynamics erode ethical sensitivity and professional boundaries in the practice of ministry?
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 652 - Formerly PASTH 598 - Narcissism&Comp:Ind.&Societal Health&Heinz Kohut's Self Psyc (3)
The course examines the psychological understanding of narcissism by surveying the progress of the theory of the psychology of the self developed by Heinz Kohut in conjunction with other theories such as Freudian and Object Relations theories. It engages in a psychological understanding of narcissistic phenomena in a developmental, rather than pathological, perspective. It thus proposes that individual and societal health is achieved by the transformation, and not elimination, of narcissistic behaviors, i.e., the transformation of an immature into a more mature narcissism characterized by creativity, sense of humor, sense of finitude, empathy, and wisdom. It also explores its theoretical implications on the lives of historical figures as well as ethical, pastoral, and theological issues. It works toward developing an ethic/theology of compassion that can address pastoral issues.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+731
PSTH 670 - Formerly PASTH 608 - Ministry to/for/with Youth (3)
This course addresses the basic theories and concepts to develop or improve youth ministry with a sound pedagogical framework and from a liberative, theological perspective. While primary focus will be on the church's ministry with, to, and for youth, some consideration will be given to youth social agencies. Attention will be given to resourcing ministries for adolescents of culturally diverse backgrounds and the relevance of these cultural worlds for the building of the realm of God.
PSTH 552 - Formerly PASTH 610 - Faith Formation and Christian Living (3)
See CERT+301 for course description.
Same as: CERT+301
PSTH 653 - Formerly PASTH 611 - Ministry Among the Disabled Community (3)
This course will examine ministry among the disabled and will include site visits to communities of the disabled and a practical component.
PSTH 676 - Formerly PASTH 612 - Equipping Disciples for Leadership (3)
This intensive course, designed for laity and clergy, will address the following questions: What is leadership? What is discipleship? For times like these, what does it mean to be a leader in the church (clergy or lay) who follows, and a disciple (clergy or lay) who leads? The course is 10% lecture, 60% discussion, 30% experiential learning.
PSTH 654 - Formerly PASTH 613 - Children, Trauma, and the Bible (3)
Statisticians tell us that millions of children around the globe are suffering physical and psychological traumas. Psychologists tell us that what constitutes "healing" for a child who has undergone trauma is still a mystery. How are religious communities to respond to these children in crisis? How do we create awareness? How do we minister to children and their families? For the church, the Bible has been the book most often turned to for guidance in times of trouble. But does the Bible really address the needs of children? In this course we attempt to explore various dimensions of childhood trauma and how the Bible can be both a weapon and a tool when it comes to the care of children.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 and BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 and PSTH - Formerly PASTH+504 Same as: BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+155
PASTH 614 - Pastoral Care In Korean Contex t (3)
This course is an introduction to the ministry of pastoral care and counseling, with an emphasis on the Korean American context. The course explores various significant issues for the Korean American community such as its immigrant experience and history, racial/ethnic identity and racism, education and economics, intergenerational and gender relationships, etc. It delves into various aspects of church ministries such as worship, Christian education, church administration, social justice ministry, pastoral care, spiritual discipline, etc. by visiting five Korean American churches. It engages in theological discourses pertaining to Korean American and Asian American experiences. The classes meet for five Fridays and are held at the five Korean American churches.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Repeatable Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Offered every other Spring.
PSTH 677 - Formerly PASTH 616 - Topics in Teaching Ministries (3)
This variable topics course will consider aspects of teaching ministries in churches.
PSTH 564 - Formerly PASTH 620 - United Methodist Worship: Form and Freedom (3)
This course is designed to enable those in the Methodist tradition to evaluate, plan, and lead worship with theological integrity and creativity. The tradition of Methodist worship is one of form and freedom, involving texts and free prayer, ordained elders and lay preaching, liturgical arts. The goal is to prepare worship leaders of congregations to do their work with theological insight, ecumenical imagination, and an evangelist's "warm heart." This course meets the requirement for UMC Basic Graduate Theological Studies.
PSTH 673 - Formerly PASTH 621 - Exploring Theological Imagination: A Spirituality of Education (3)
This course is built on the notion that God is in everyone, every act, every element of creation. Consequently, the activity of God can be known, witnessed, obeyed. This course will develop the skill of theological reflection with emphasis on intuition and wonderment. The class will, by reading literature of the mystics, doing personal reflection, and critical analysis, explore ways of doing theological reflection.
PSTH 674 - Formerly PASTH 623 - Theology, Education, and Media (3)
This course explores the culture of media in ministry and Christian education. Today, together with the traditional media such as radio, television, and video, the new media, which include the Internet and multimedia, are rapidly advancing through the development of computer technology and creating a new culture of communication. Students examine those forms of media that include representative state-of-the-art forms, focusing on their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their possibilities and limitations for ministry and Christian education.
PSTH 675 - Formerly PASTH 624 - Soul Pedagogy: Teaching For Spiritual Experience (3)
We are spirits that matter. (source unknown) Classrooms are a primary context for teaching Christian faith in theological education and the local church. As such, many schools and churches struggle with the predominance of theory over practice even for those aware of the necessity for germane experiences of spirituality in preparation for effective ministry. In this course, we will explore what it means to bring the experience of spirituality into classrooms for the enabling of liberative learning. The aim of the course is to assist teachers and church leaders to become a community of interpretation to expand our collective literacy concerning issues of Christian spirituality and teaching. A primary resource for this course will be spiritual experience. Our primary questions are: How do we nurture teachers who are smart at their own discipline as well as skilled in discernment, intuition, and wisdom? What does it mean to create classrooms that honor the necessity of both interior and exterior life?
PSTH 600 - Formerly PASTH 628 - Writing for WOR(d)SHIP (3)
The word "worship" is from Old English and means, "to honor or esteem the being of another." Through the holy, human art of language, communities can be created and individual lives enriched. The discipline of writing builds confidence, clarity and creativity in speech as well as the written word. This course will concentrate on writing for public worship, and focus on creating, revising, and leading original prayers, liturgies, hymns, and meditations.
PSTH 590 - Formerly PASTH 632 - Polity, Doctrine, and History (2-3)
A study of the polity and history of the various denominations: Presbyterian, Episcopal, United Church of Christ, Baptist, and others. (For United Methodist polity see CHST - Formerly CHIST+260, 261.) Offered by special arrangement.
PSTH 640 - Formerly PASTH 633 - Spirituality of Joy (3)
This course explores the theological and psychological analysis of joy and develops a spirituality of joy. It surveys biblical understandings of joy, examines the theological insights on joy of John Wesley, Karl Barth, and Jurgen Moltmann, and investigates the psychological conception of joy by Heinz Kohut. In addition, the course engages in self-reflections demonstrating a practice of a spirituality of joy.
PSTH 634 - Formerly PASTH 634 - Topics in Pastoral Theology (3)
A study of theological reflection on the culture and practices of Christian communities. Explores theology as a practical discipline.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 635 - Formerly PASTH 635 - Developing Christian Camp/Re treat Curriculum and Events (3)
See CERT+311 for course description.
Same as: CERT+311
PSTH 580 - Formerly PASTH 637 - Spiritual Disc.For Personal, Parish, & Ecological Renewal (3)
An orientation to the history and practice of Christian prayer forms and spiritual disciplines as they may be applied for personal, parish and ecological renewal. Exploration of the relationship of prayer to other spiritual disciplines, such as corporate worship, prophetic witness, hospitable social service, processes of discernment, spiritual healing and care of creation.
PSTH 641 - Formerly PASTH 638 - Shame&Grace:A Landscape of Healing&Reconcil.in the 21Cent (3)
This course explores biblical experiences of shame, examines various psychological theories on shame, and works toward constructing a shame-based theology of reconciliation to address the ineffectiveness of the current theology of atonement that are predominantly guilt-oriented. The examination of psychological theories on shame informs the need for a more holistic approach to theology of grace that can complement the weakness of the guilt-based theology of atonement to attend to pervasively shame-based culture in the 21st Century.
Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+738
PSTH 630 - Formerly PASTH 642 - God-Talk with Black Thinkers (3)
This interdisciplinary series highlights Black scholars from across the United States and from around the world. Visiting Black scholars, from a variety of theological disciplines, will offer courses based upon their own theological discipline and religious expertise. An unique aspect of the series will be courses co-taught by spouses who are in the same or complementary theological disciplines.
Course may be repeated.
PASTH 647 - Intern Year (6)
M.Div. students engaged in an approved Intern Year Program register for this course. (Consult Office of Supervised Ministry for further details.) Students engaged in such a program participate in preparatory and post-intern year conferences and maintain a journal that includes reflection upon issues of ministry arising in the intern-year setting that are the basis for supervisory conferences with Theological School personnel. In addition, the student writes a paper involving theological reflection upon the field situation under the supervision of a member of the Theological School faculty. Six academic credits are given for satisfactory completion of an approved intern year; a fee is charged for enrollment in the intern-year program. Approval and signature of the director of supervised ministry required for registration. Satisfies requirement in Supervised Ministerial Practice (PSTH 521 - Formerly PASTH 521 -, 522).
PSTH 619 - Formerly PASTH 649 - THEOLGIES OF STORY AND SACRAMENT (3)
Draws on historical and theological foundations for worship and spirituality through critical reflection on narrative theology in worship, preaching, autobiography, story-telling and Scripture. Ministerial leaders live and breathe at the intersection of stories that are secular and sacred, human and holy. Communities of faith construct narratives that signify the traditions that shape their ministries. This course will explore the use of narrative in personal identity and congregational development. Term project includes a written spiritual-theological portrait of one's congregational or ministry context).
PSTH 560 - Formerly PASTH 650 - Ministry and the Imagination (3)
This variable topic course focuses on some aspect of creative expression in ministry and worship.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated.
PSTH 631 - Formerly PASTH 653 - Topics in Postmodern Theology (3)
A cutting edge seminar series on telling the Story in the foreign land of postmodern culture, the course features recent materials from Leonard Sweet's writings and insights as he engages postmodern culture.
PSTH 562 - Formerly PASTH 663 - A Musical Study (1)
A practicum/performance of original sacred music/text designed for intergenerational participation and multicultural settings. In addition to preparing the piece for public performance, students will discuss issues surrounding the theological aspects of the experience.
PSTH 557 - Formerly PASTH 668 - Topics in Church Music (3)
A course that will examine various topics in church music.
May be repeated for credit.
PSTH 563 - Formerly PASTH 669 - Music of the World's Religions (3)
This course looks at several world religions and examines the interrelationship between ritual and music with a particular emphasis on the musical repertoires. Religious traditions studied include Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and and Native American..
This course fulfills the M.Div. requirement for a course on world religions. Same as: MUS+35
PSTH 671 - Formerly PASTH 671 - Urban Ministry: Critical Pedagogical Issues (3)
The city is a place of great cultural expression as well as a place of devastating poverty. What does it mean to "do" ministry with race and culture in mind? What does it mean to create a teaching church in the rich cultural context of urban settings? What does it mean to nurture faith in the face of pluralism and particularity? How can a church leader be an effective pastor in the city? Issues of race (specifically, white, black, Korean, and Hispanic), class and sexual orientation will be emphasized.
PSTH 585 - Formerly PASTH 673 - Sabbath as a Spiritual Practice (3)
The notion of "Sabbath" is an ancient one that centers on the necessity of rest for wholeness and healing. Church leaders who are intentional and conscientious about the spiritual journey must include care for body, mind, and spirit. At times, this care is "Sabbath rest." This course, which may be repeated for credit, will have make use of an experiential pedagogy and will focus on assisting leaders and scholars in incorporating practices of Sabbath into their wellness regimen.
Course may be repeated.
PSTH 591 - Formerly PASTH 675 - Topics in Ministry of Administration (3)
Covers the wide range of issues confronting leaders of centers: time management and setting priorities, taking charge and facilitating staff and volunteers, fiscal responsibility and understanding budgets, keeping records, ethical concerns. Emphasis is on helping each participant develop his/her own style of leadership, on developing a sense of team ministry, on dealing productively with conflict, and on developing the discipline necessary for successful self-direction.
PSTH 592 - Formerly PASTH 676 - American Academy of Religion: travel seminar (1)
The American Academy of Religion (AAR) is the professional organization for scholars and researchers in religion. This course is to encourage seminary and graduate students to attend this annual gathering.
PSTH 637 - Formerly PASTH 677 - The Art of Theological Reflection (3)
There is a vital connection between faith and daily living. The ability to make this connection can be taught as a skill and nurtured as an art. This course will assist students in developing the artful discipline of putting their experience into conversation with the heritage of the Christian tradition. Through practical experience and reflection we will learn to experience greater meaning in life and a more tangible sense of God's creative presence.
PSTH 638 - Formerly PASTH 678 - Dean's Seminar in Ministerial Formation (1)
This seminar for M.Div. students in their last year, will examine the impact of our curriculum on our ministerial formation, discuss the students' intentions for post-graduation ministry, and create a five-year plan for continuing education. The seminar will be led by the Dean of the Theological School and will include guest presentations by faculty from the various divisions and practitioners.
Prerequisite: 50 credits toward the M.Div.
PSTH 679 - Formerly PASTH 679 - Christian Education Practices in the Local Church (3)
This course is designed to prepare seminarians as well as persons with the responsibility for the Christian Education Ministries in the Local Church to: administer (plan, implement resources, and evaluate) the multifaceted educational ministries from nursery school to senior centers. We will explore strategies to nurture disciples via the Sunday School, Bible studies, koinonia groups, special interest groups, etc. The "Role of the Pastor" in a teaching church will also be emphasized.
PSTH 681 - Formerly PASTH 681 - Language and Learning in Theological Education (3)
This course is an intensive English language course designed to develop advanced English language skills for successful academic achievement in theological education, familiarity with American academic culture, the diversity of worship experiences in American Christianity, and select cultural opportunities in the metro New York Area. Intended specifically for students whose primary language is not English or for those students who have not had previous post-secondary instruction in English, the course focuses on the development of critical thinking in all aspects of language expression and interactive learning opportunities for the advanced development of listening, speaking, writing, and pronunciation skills.
Offered annually comprises two parts: daily instruction (M-F) during the month of August and one class meeting weekly during the fall semester.
PSTH 566 - Formerly PASTH 682 - United Methodist Women's Studies: Assembly (2)
This course is offered every four years in conjunction with the United Methodist Womens Assembly of the United Methodist Church. Students participate in a pre-departure seminar at Drew to prepare for the three day conference. Course materials will include UMW mission studies as well as texts on women and Methodism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
PSTH 684 - Formerly PASTH 684 - Spiritual Direction/Companionship (3)
This course is an introduction to the discipline and art of spiritual direction/companionship as a significant ministry of the Christian church. Class participants will be exposed to the purposes and historical roots of direction; its various theological foundations, and essential practices, including the role and limits of the spiritual director. This course is designed for students seeking an introductory understanding of spiritual direction/companionship and those testing or affirming a vocational call to spiritual formation ministries.
PSTH 685 - Formerly PASTH 685 - Practicum in Spiritual Direction/Companionship I (1)
This supervised field education experience will allow students to put into practice what they learned in Pasth 684 Spiritual Direction/Companionship II in local churches and community settings while receiving regular supervision.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+684.
PSTH 584 - Formerly PASTH 686 - Practicum in Spiritual Direction/Companionship II (1)
This supervised field education experience is a continuation of the first semester of the practicum.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+684.
PSTH 601 - Formerly PASTH 687 - Homiletical Resources (3)
This course will survey the various devices preachers utilize in the preaching moment: voice, literature, culture, music, video, power point, internet, drama, imagination, and much more. Additionally, this class will guide students how to employ these tools responsibly. The itinerary will be designed to give students ample opportunities to practice preaching with different homiletical resources. The course seeks to increase the student's learning through multiple methods: class discussion of readings and lectures, the student's preparation and delivery of several sermons, instructor and peer evaluations of the student's sermons, extemporaneous exercises, written assignments, and analysis of published and videotaped sermons of well known professional clergy.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+506.
PSTH 602 - Formerly PASTH 688 - The Spirituality of Howard Thurman (3)
This course will survey the life and ministry of Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman. Within the framework of spirituality, the class will critically inspect his theological foundations, his theological formation, his particular theology (with particular emphasis on his views of God, Jesus, mysticism, homiletical theology, and liturgical theology), the practice of that theology, the pivotal points of his ministry, and his positive contributions to race relations, religious studies, ecumenism, and interfaith dialogue. Also, this course will investigate the historical significance of Rev. Thurman's ministry with particular attention given to the periods of the Social Gospel and the Civil Rights Movement. The course seeks to increase the student's learning through multiple methods: class discussion of readings and lectures, exploration of spiritual disciplines, extemporaneous exercises, written assignments, and experiencing and analyzing Thurman via video and audio mediums.
PSTH 691 - Formerly PASTH 691 - Chapel Practicum (1)
The Chapel Practicum offers second and third year students the opportunity to engage their interest in a particular aspect of the development and performance of worship: writing liturgy, music leadership, liturgical dance, liturgical art, etc. The primary requirement is a biweekly meeting with the chapel director to determine the ways in which the student will contribute to worship development during the chapel season. The student must also attend chapel at least two times a week and support the presentation of worship those two times.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Course may be repeated.
PSTH 680 - Formerly PASTH 695 - Emancipatory Teaching (3)
This advanced course will consider teaching as a tool for dismantling oppression. It will address theoretical and practical issues that confront pastors/educators engaged in the challenge of social justice ministry. The class will seek to understand and critically analyze theories and practices of teaching/learning which have liberation at their core. The role of spirituality in emancipatory teaching will be emphasized.
PSTH 696 - Formerly PASTH 696 - What's Love Got to Do With It?: Womanist Teaching for the Beloved Community (3)
Teaching at its most powerful liberates. This course is an examination of theories and methods of creating and sustaining a sense of community for teaching and learning that resists oppression and fosters justice. This course will examine the role oppression plays in maintaining structures of alienation and fragmentation.
PSTH 573 - Formerly PASTH 773 - Introduction to Acting and Public Performance (3)
A study of the fundamentals of acting and how performance skills can be applied to other forms of public expression, such as giving speeches or impromptu talks, doing church readings or other oral interpretations. Includes various techniques in preparing a role and developing such skills as relaxation, concentration, rehearsal, and performance practices, building a character, and working with a director. Practical application of these skills may include readings, storytelling, scenes and monologues. Open to those with no theatrical experience, as well as those who have acted before.

PCC

PCC 957 - Family Crisis (3)
Presents a spectrum of literature on personal, couple, and family crisis and models for crisis intervention. Investigates the utility of personal life crises as a vehicle for understanding the emotional dynamics of crisis and enhancing crisis intervention skills. Employs casework on crisis counseling.

RLSC - Formerly RLSOC

RLSC 704 - Formerly RLSOC 704 - Autobiography and the Religious Life (3)
A consideration of autobiographical writings, including journals, diaries, essays, and autobiographical novels, with particular attention to stories, accounts, depictions of religious life as pilgrimage, chosen path, visitation, ordeal, and ordinary life. Sources include a wide range of readings, including a consideration of figures of interest to students.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
RLSC 721 - Formerly RLSOC 721 - Contemporary Ethical Issues (3)
An exploration of contemporary issues, such as sexuality, economics, and globalization; their importance; and the contributions of Christian ethics to understanding and dealing with them.
RLSC 725 - Formerly RLSOC 725 - History of Western Christian Ethics (3)
A study of selected themes and formative figures in Christian ethics, with attention to their contributions to contemporary reflection.
RLSC 728 - Formerly RLSOC 728 - Gay and Lesbian Liberation Theologies in World Religions (3)
This doctoral seminar strives to collectively explore through research, presentations, discussions, films, etc., some of the ways in which emerging lesbian and gay struggles for liberation intersect with the diverse religious traditions present in world Christianity.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 729 - Formerly RLSOC 729 - Feminist Sociology of Religion (3)
An exploration of ways in which a feminist perspective is emerging today in the social-scientific study of religions and the ways in which it might challenge and enrich assumptions about religion. Examines theoretical essays and field-research materials expressing that standpoint within the socio-biology of religions, as well as contibutions emerging from such areas as feminist theologies. The seminar's approach and method attempt to embody traits central to the feminist perspective itself.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 730 - Formerly RLSOC 730 - Religion and Social Change (3)
Selected problems and themes in the sociology of religion regarding issues of religion and social change. For example: religious involvement in social movements, disruptive religion, global Pentecostalism and social change, gender issues, colonialism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 740 - Formerly RLSOC 740 - Geopolitics of Race: Colonial Expansion to Post-Racial Era (3)
Through the lenses of geopolitics and postcolonial/decolonial studies, this course provides an examination of how the disciplinary measure of "racializing bodies" has been integral to social domination and stratification from the colonial imperial expansions to the Americas and sheds light on how marginalization through racialization continues to operate in an era labeled "post-racial." This course will also look at how race has been mobilized from the margins as a resource for resistance.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every other spring.
RLSC 743 - Formerly RLSOC 743 - Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory (3)
A consideration of the basic papers of British psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott to gain an initial literacy in object relations theory; to understand and gain a facility for the metaphorical language of psychoanalytic thought and the metaphorical nature of symbolization theory and the language of the self: the dual and subtle constructions of "self," "other," "God," and "world." Additional papers using object relations theory as a basis for interpretive work are considered from the disciplines of religious studies, literary criticism, feminist thought, anthropology, and music.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 745 - Formerly RLSOC 745 - Selected Thinkers and Themes in Psychology and Religion (3)
An introduction to thinkers and themes in the modern West in psychology and religion, including Freud, Jung, Eliade, James, Tillich, Rubenstein, Gilligan, Lifton, and Daly. Themes include anxiety and courage, faith and identity, symbolic immorality; the psychology of the survivor; feminist consciousness and cultural mourning; theology after the Holocaust.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 757 - Formerly RLSOC 757 - Illness of Body, Mind, and Spirit (3)
An examination of basic concepts of psychiatry. Describes their philosophical underpinnings. More concretely, addresses such issues as health and illness in body, mind, and spirit.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 771 - Formerly RLSOC 771 - Major Thinkers & Major Themes in the Soc. & Anth. of Rel. (3)
A seminar focusing on one particular thinker or one important theme in the history of the social scientific study of religion. Required for sociology of religion concentration.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 779 - Formerly RLSOC 779 - Classical Theories in the Sociology of Religion (3)
An introduction to some of the main theories and theorists in the sociological study of religion, developed in the North Atlantic urban centers from the last half of the 19th century to the first decades of the 20th century. Karl Marx's (and his colleague and often co-author, Friedrich Engels'), Max Weber's, and Emile Durkheim's contributions to the sociology of religion are often the focus of this course.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester in alternate years
RLSC 780 - Formerly RLSOC 780 - Deconstructing Racism (3)
An examination of interdisciplinary approaches that describe how racial superiority and inferiority are socially constructed in the U.S. culture. Investigates some of the ways that social norms about race are translated into moral norms and upheld by institutional and individual behavior.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 785 - Formerly RLSOC 785 - Critical Approaches in Epistemology (3)
This is a course on the subject of human knowledge as a problematic issue, examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Thus, this course will concentrate on some crucial issues interrelating, on the one hand, the sociology, psychology, and biology of knowledge, the history of science and philosophical theories of knowledge, with, on the other hand, human action and religious thought. In particular, we will privilege analytical and critical perspectives on gender, race, culture, and class as cognitive contexts including for theology, ethics, and ministry.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 795 - Formerly RLSOC 795 - Topics in Religion and Society (3)
An intensive study of selected problems and themes in religion and society.
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Offered every other Spring.

STM

STM 675 - Formerly 675 - S.T.M. Thesis Tutorial (3-6)
Open to students engaged in the writing of a thesis for the Master of Sacred Theology program.
Signature of instructor required for registration.

TPHL - Formerly THEPH

TPHL 500 - Formerly THEPH 300 - Philosophical Resources for Theology (3)
An examination of philosophy as a distinctive way of thinking and as an influence on and resource for theology. Students read primary texts of such figures as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, and Kant, as well as current thinkers. (Required only for those students in the M.Div. program with no previous work in philosophy.)
Fall semester annually.
TPHL 501 - Formerly THEPH 301 - Systematic Theology (3)
Systematic and constructive interpretations of central themes of Christian faith: God, Creation, Providence, Jesus Christ, humanity, evil, discipleship, Holy Spirit, church, eschatology.
To be taken by M.Div. students in the first year of study. Same as: LGON - Formerly LOGON+301
TPHL 508 - Formerly THEPH 308 - Challenge of World Religions to Christian Practice (3)
An examination of the ways in which the reality of other religions and their teachings poses questions for the church's self-understanding, faith, and mission. The focus of the study is on enabling Christian congregations to deal creatively with religious plurality,
Same as: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+371
TPHL 610 - Formerly THEPH 310 - Topics in Theology (3)
An intermediate-level course for Theological School students.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 611 - Formerly THEPH 311 - Reformed Theology (3)
Reformed theology is a conversation carried on by a global family of churches who claim to some degree today the inheritance of the 16th- century Reformation in Switzerland. Important to Reformed faith and practice are a body of historical confessions that have helped give shape to the tradition. What makes it Reformed, however, is a commitment to a way of doing things theologically in the church and in life. Ecclesia reformata semper reformanda--the church reformed and always reforming--is the motto of the movement. This course will provide an opportunity to explore the contours of Reformed theology, paying attention to its historical formations, contemporary expressions, and pastoral implications for church and community. The course is designed to be particularly relevant to those in Presbyterian, Reformed, and United Church of Christ communions who are seeking ordination. Everyone, however, is invited. After all, who doesn't believe the church ought to be always reforming?
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 622 - Formerly THEPH 322 - Topics in Comparative Theology (3)
This series of seminars explores comparative theology as a new way of doing Christian theology interreligiously and cross-traditionally, with a view to constructing Christian doctrines with the help of the insights gained from a dialogical and comparative engagement with another religious tradition. The comparison will focus on figures (e.g., Whitehead and Zhu Xi), concepts/themes (e.g., Logos and Tao), or texts (e.g., The Soul's Journey into God and The Bodhicaryavatara). A particular attention will be given to engaging the North East Asian traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Mahayana Buddhism."
Course may be repeated.
TPHL 624 - Formerly THEPH 324 - Theology of Mission (3)
A historical overview of the theology of mission that has undergirded the missionary task of the church with special emphasis on the challenges facing mission theology in our day.
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 626 - Formerly THEPH 326 - Authority of Scripture and Tradition: Ecumenical Advances (3)
Understanding of the "teaching authority of the church" has been one of the most divisive issues in the life of the church. The seminar seeks to study the advances made within the ecumenical movement on the question of the authority of scripture and tradition.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 529 - Formerly THEPH 329 - The Theology and Ecology of Common Ground (3)
See CERT+302 for course description.
Same as: CERT+302
TPHL 634 - Formerly THEPH 334 - Process Theology (3)
An in-depth study of the sources and development of process theology, moving from Whitehead's Process and Reality to representative works by recent thinkers, such as Hartshome, Cobb, Griffin, Brock, and Suchocki.
TPHL 635 - Formerly THEPH 335 - Schleiermacher and Tillich (3)
An examination of writings of two theologians of the liberal tradition. Schleiermacher (1768--1834) inaugurated the liberal strain in Protestantism with his revolutionary 1799 Speeches in which he shaped the emergent contours of a universal religion. In his 1822 Christian Faith he unfolded a phenomenology of consciousness that fulfilled the Kantian project for religion. Tillich (1886--1965), referring to Schleiermacher as his spiritual grandfather, developed an existential theology in dialogue with contemporary culture and in some respects brought the grand liberal tradition to a high water mark. His major work of 1951-1963, Sytematic Theology Vols. I, II, III, will be the focus of the course's reflections.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 636 - Formerly THEPH 336 - The Theology of Karl Barth (3)
Consists of two units: 1) Barth's break with liberal theology, and 2) structure and development in the Church Dogmatics. Readings are concentrated in the commentary on Romans and Church Dogmatics I & II. Throughout, historical context and later criticisms and appropriations are considered.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 639 - Formerly THEPH 339 - Seminar in Contemporary Theology (3)
Key current themes and texts in Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish theology.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 641 - Formerly THEPH 341 - Interpretation of Christ in Traditions and Cultures (3)
Who is he, and what do his life, death, and resurrection mean to us? This Christological question is answered in many ways within the New Testament and in the early church, leading to the development of many Christological interpretations in the Church. Other contextual and cultural interpretations of Christ emerged when Christianity moved into Asia, Africa and Latin America . This course attempts to map and critically evaluate these developments.
TPHL 647 - Formerly THEPH 347 - Theo.of Spirit:A Panentheistic Exploration of the World (3)
This course attempts to rethink the idea of the Spirit by questioning the asymmetrically binary constructions of classical Western thought, i.e., of transcendence and immanence, spirit and nature, mind and body, ideal and material, eternity and time, permanence and change, etc., and by seeking more immanent, earthly, dynamic, processional, relational, and pluralistic ways of construing God. The course examines some modern and contemporary theologians and philosophers such as Hegel, Tillich, Whitehead, Deleuze, Hodgson, Clayton, Keller, Schneider, etc. This course is a seminar designed for intermediate to advanced students. The students are assumed to have taken Systematic Theology or its equivalent.
TPHL 648 - Formerly THEPH 348 - Topics in Spirituality (3)
This course covers variable topics in the field of spirituality.
Course may be repeated.
TPHL 650 - Formerly THEPH 350 - Doctrines of Revelation:How do We Know What We Know About God (3)
A study of different formulations of the doctrine of revelation by modern and contemporary theologians, formulations that are a part of a larger systematics as well as free-standing contextual, constructive formulations. What are the different ways theologians - modern and postmodern, neo-orthodox to feminist - have interpreted this traditional doctrine of God's self-disclosure as the source of our knowledge of and language for God? And what are the reasons for, and consequences of, those differences, both theologically and ethically?
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 651 - Formerly THEPH 351 - Asian Theologies (3)
A seminar dealing with major themes and figures in Asian theology.
TPHL 653 - Formerly THEPH 353 - Hindu Theologies and Philosophies (3)
A study of the basic theological and philosophical schools of Hinduism with primary emphasis on Hindu Scriptures.
THEPH 354 - Asian Theologies of Liberation and Indigenization (3)
This course is an introduction to the major themes and figures of Asian Christian theologies, particularly focusing on the two predominant themes of liberation and indigenization. During the last several decades, as the younger churches in the Asian continent came into their own, theologies have emerged there responding to the task of socio-political liberation from both the internal and the external colonial domination on the one hand and cultural liberation (indigenization) from the Western cultural hegemony on the other. This course examines some of the most renowned examples of Asian liberation theologies, such as Minjung theology and Dalit theology, and the various intercultural and interreligious attempts at theologies of indigenization represented by figures such as Aloysius Pieris, Heup Young Kim, and M. Thomas Thangaraj
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301 Systematic Theology.
TPHL 655 - Formerly THEPH 355 - Tao and Logos: A Confucian/ Taoist-Christian Dialogue (3)
This course consists of an introduction to the basic texts and motifs of the major North East Asian traditions of Confucianism and Daoism, followed by an attempt to bring specific texts, themes, and thinkers into dialogue with Christian theology in order to answer the question: What can Christian theologians learn from Confucianism/Daoism? Students will first read selected primary sources, focusing on the classical figures of Confucius, Mencius, Xunzi, Laozi, and Zhuangzi, and the central themes of Tao, Heaven, ren, ritual, self-cultivation, ziran, and wuwei, and then proceed to examine some examples of Confucian-Christian and/or Daoist-Christian dialogue. Students will also be introduced to methods for the emerging field of comparative theology, notably Robert. C. Neville, Francis X. Clooney, and James Fredericks.
Same as: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+762
TPHL 657 - Formerly THEPH 357 - Hegel: Reason, Revolution, and the Beginning of Liberation T heology (3)
This course is an advanced seminar on Hegel's religious thought and its legacy in Marx and Liberation Theology, with a particular focus on his pioneering panentheistic approach to Christian theology and its emancipatory potentials in a world of increasing dehumanization and alienation at the crossroads of the globally dominant North Atlantic capitalist late-modernity. We will closely examine selections from his Phenomenology of Spirit, Philosophy of Right, Lectures on the Philosophy of World History, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, and other relevant texts, with a view to assessing critically the theological contribution of his dialectical approach to the modern and late-modern split between subject and object, ideal and material, spirit and nature, reason and history, master and slave, and divine and creaturely. We will also examine Hegel's tremendous influence on Marx's humanism as evinced in his early works, especially The Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, an
Repeatable. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Pre-Requisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH*301. Offered every other spring.
TPHL 661 - Formerly THEPH 361 - Kant and Hegel (3)
A concentrated study of selected texts, with special, but not exclusive, emphasis on philosophy of religion.
TPHL 662 - Formerly THEPH 362 - American Philosophy (3)
Details the rise of a distinctive American philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries. Figures covered include Emerson, Peirce, James, Royce, Dewey, Santayana, and Buchler. The focus is on the development of pragmatism, idealism, semiotics, naturalism, and systematic metaphysics. Conceptual analyses are correlated with contextual and social studies of the place of Euro-American thought in the larger culture of North America.
Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+362
TPHL 664 - Formerly THEPH 364 - The Spiritual Quest (3)
This course considers visions of the Divine/Ultimate/Absolute as they are lived out in different traditions and various contexts. Turning to the past as well as the present, we will explore experiences relating to higher consciousness, personal transcendence, and social transformation. We approach these experiences by examining a number of historical and contemporary spiritual writers, ways of being "spiritual," and particular faith communities in their social and religious contexts.
TPHL 668 - Formerly THEPH 368 - Theology of Gi: An East Asian Perspective on God (3)
This advanced seminar attempts to explore an alternative philosophical framework in which to articulate the Christian doctrine of God. To this end, the course will examine the East Asian philosophical concept of Gi (Qi), translated "material force" or "vital energy." The focus will be on whether the concept of Gi can point beyond the metacosmic/cosmic distinction -- that is, the ontological/cosmological distinction -- that has characterized the classical theism of Christian doctrine of God. The work undertaken in this course will be complementary to the contemporary movements within Christian theology which question the asymmetrically binary constructions of classical Western thought, i.e., of transcendence and immanence, spirit and nature, mind and body, ideal and material, eternity and time, permanence and change etc., with the accompanying political and ecological ramifications. The nature of this course will be comparative theology and comparative philosophy of religion, with
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 570 - Formerly THEPH 370 - Topics in World Religions: (3)
This course offers changing topics related to the study of world religions.
May be repeated.
TPHL 674 - Formerly THEPH 374 - Ecstatic Naturalism (3)
This class will involve an in-depth study of the various ways nature has been presented in world thinking with particular focus on South Asian and Euro-American traditions. Specific topics: the sacred, the spirit, naturalism (especially in its ecstatic form), grace, art via-a-vis religion, and a new theory of nature's self.
TPHL 679 - Formerly THEPH 379 - Ecumenical Theology/Modern Liturgies (3)
A cycle of seminars, each examining vital ecumenical concerns. The seminars include Theology of Religions in the Ecumenical Movement; Ecclesiology and Ethics; Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation; Dialogue and Mission; The "Ecumenical" and the "Evangelical"; and History, Development, and Prospects of the Ecumenical Movement.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 680 - Formerly THEPH 380 - Studies in the Philosophy of Religion (3)
Descriptions for each offering are available at the time of registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 584 - Formerly THEPH 384 - Theological Research and Writing Skills (2)
This course intends to teach the research and writing skills needed for academic and professional progress in ministry. Students will develop proficiency in the planning of research and in finding and using information sources in theological and related areas; they will also develop written communication skills. Weekly assignments will be hands-on exercises involving the use of these skills. The course is team-taught by a theological librarian and a professional writing instructor.
TPHL 691 - Formerly THEPH 391 - Major Figures in Philosophical Theology (3)
A seminar focusing on one major figure from the Western or Eastern traditions. Examples include, but are not limited to, Martin Heidegger, Charles Sanders Peirce, Helena Blavatsky, Sri Aurobindo, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and William James.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 692 - Formerly THEPH 392 - Nature, God, and the New Cosmology (3)
An examination of some of the implications of the new cosmology for traditional ideas. The first part of this course looks at several conceptions of nature as they illuminate science and theology. The second part of the course probes into the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory insofar as they, too, illuminate the relationship between God and nature. The final part of the course examines current cosmological theories, with particular attention to those of Hawking. Topics include creation and the Big Bang, the origin of time, the no-boundary proposal, the Anthropic principle, the status of eschatology, and the problem of teleology.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 694 - Formerly THEPH 394 - Interfaith Dialogue (3)
A study of the emergence and development of Interfaith Dialogue, its principles, methods, and theological assumptions as a response to religious plurality within the Ecumenical Movement. The course involves the study of the documents of Vatican II, Word Council of Churches, and Ecumenical Considerations in Christian-Muslim, Christian-Jewish and other relationships.
Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301

THES - Formerly THESIS

THES 690 - Formerly THESIS 690 - M.A.THESIS TUTORIAL (6)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: INTR - Formerly INTER+691 must be completed in the previous semester.

TUTT - Formerly TUT

TUT 690 - Tutorial (1-3)
Available only with special permission. Permission includes agreement of a faculty instructor to supervise the tutorial project and approval of the arrangement by the Committee on Academic Standing. Tutorials are normally not available as a regular option.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.

WSP

WSP 900 - Formerly 900 - Foundations in Worship and Spirituality (3)
Promotes critical reflection on ministerial leadership in the congregation through preaching, teaching, and theological reflection. Includes a 3-day retreat/advance at teaching church or extension site, and a follow-up session on historical and theological foundations for ministry. Course objective: to understand the role of worship and spiritual formation in one's particular denominational tradition and congregational history. Term project includes a written theological portrait of one's congregational ethos.
WSP 901 - Formerly 901 - Theology of Sacrament & Story (3)
Draws on historical and theological foundations for worship and spirituality through critical reflection on the acts of preaching, teaching, story-telling and imaginative interpretation of Scripture. Ministerial leaders live and breathe at the intersection of stories that are secular and sacred, human and holy. Communities of faith construct narratives that signify the traditions that shape their ministries in healing or wounding ways. This course will explore the use of narrative in personal identity and congregational development. Course objective: to understand the role of worship and spiritual formation in one's particular denominational tradition and congregational history. Term project includes a written spiritual-theological portrait of one's "parish" (congregational or ministry context).
Offered at Drew during fall term 2004.
WSP 902 - Formerly 902 - The Preaching Life (3)
This foundational course will examine the life of the sermon and preaching with specific attention given to centering the sermon in the church's liturgy and centering the preacher in a life of spiritual discipline. This course will be taught in New York City with particular attention given to the history of preaching in this urban context.
WSP 910 - Formerly 910 - Leading in Worship and Spiritual Formation (3)
An active learning event and planning retreat for contemporary worship and ritual, focused on practical skills and ministerial leadership development. Offered at Drew Extension Sites.
WSP 911 - Formerly 911 - Ministerial Leadership and Congregational Dynamics (3)
Explores the use of family systems theory in the analysis of the inner dynamics of the congregation and the pastor's leadership style.
WSP 912 - Formerly 912 - Writing for Worship (3)
Focused on practical skills used in writing for contemporary worship and ritual.
WSP 920 - Formerly 920 - Spirituality and Community (3)
Explores the classical Christian contemplative tradition in light of spiritual experience and trends in the modern and postmodern eras, and considers new ways to appropriate ancient wisdom for the contemporary church and community.
WSP 921 - Formerly 921 - The Contemplative Tradition an d Contemporary Preaching (3)
This three-credit seminar is a journey through the history of Christian spirituality especially the contemplative tradition. We will explore the spiritual disciplines that focus on reading the Scriptures. The study is designed to examine the enduring and variable dimensions of sermons from era to era, with a focus on the contemporary preaching experience.
WSP 961 - Formerly 961 - The Varieties of Spiritual Experience (3)
In contemporary American culture, the term "spirituality" can be applied to anything and everything: addiction recovery therapies, alternative medicine regimens, diet plans, and financial investment strategies are labeled and marketed as spirituality options. The cultural ethos that sustains the spirituality movement and is reflected in the phenomenon offers opportunities and hazards for the church. This course examines the development, spread and varieties of spirtuality in the context of postmodernity, and its import for constructive theology.
Same as: DMIN+961
WSP 962 - Formerly 962 - Figures in Contemporary Spirituality: The Life and Work of Henri J. M. Nouwen (3)
As a Dutch psychologist, contemplative theologian and Roman Catholic priest, Henri Nouwen's shaping influence on contemporary Christian spirituality is unsurpassed. This introductory course traces his extraordinary life---from his birth and childhood in the Netherlands, through his academic career at Notre Dame, Yale and Harvard, to his final days at L'Arche Daybreak Community near Toronto---and reviews many of his 40 books on spiritual life.
Same as: DMIN+962
WSP 972 - Formerly 972 - Pilgrimage: Exploring Celtic Sites with Christian Faith (3)
Celtic Christianity flourished from the fifth to the twelfth centuries in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany and northern France. Emerging from the mists of time, Celtic spirituality continues to resonate with many interests and concerns of contemporary Christians and seekers of faith. This travel-study seminar will explore the rich Celtic traditions by visiting historic sites in Wales and hearing presentations from a variety of international scholars at St. Deiniol's Library, Wales. Celtic themes include: divine immanence, intimacy with God, soul friendship, solitude and community, communion of the saints, and "thin places in the universe." Preparatory reading and integrative term paper required.
Same as: DMIN+972
WSP 980 - Formerly 980 - Theological Methods and Practice (2)
Building on the understanding of ministry in the postmodern context, the course will introduce students to relevant research methodologies and tools that may be employed in the Doctor of Ministry project. Framing the project theologically and contextually, students begin to conceptualize the components of the project that will enable them to address the project focus.