Mini-Grant

Purpose

The Mellon funded multi-year initiative The Arts and the Common Good seeks to illustrate the various ways in which the arts – in concert and dialogue with other areas of exploration and knowledge – help us understand what the common good is (and what it is not), how we can achieve this good, and what we must do to strengthen, expand, and sustain it. The mini-grants are designed to engage faculty in disciplines outside of the arts with this endeavor and promote interdisciplinary exploration of such themes as: “the arts and invention/generation,” “the arts and public discourse,” “the arts and risk,” “the arts and imagination,” “the arts and difference,” and “the arts and the communication of ideas.” This can be achieved, for example, through conference and workshop attendance, independent research, organizing campus events, forming partnerships with arts organizations, and special projects.

Eligibility

Grants may be awarded to members of the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts teaching in disciplines outside of the arts (except in the case of collaborative grants), including those teaching at least half-time and those on sabbatical or leave without pay. Collaborative grants that include at least two faculty members (one of which may be in an arts discipline) will also be considered. When the Mellon Advisory Committee considers applications, priority will be given to applications from tenured or tenure-track faculty, followed by full-time non-tenure-track faculty, and then part-time faculty.

Deadlines

We are no longer accepting applications for Mellon ACG faculty grants.

 

Funding Amount

A maximum of $1,000 per request or $1,000 per faculty member in the case of collaborative grants.  The Mellon Advisory Committee sets the funding limit and reviews it periodically.  The limit may vary according to the size of the budgetary allocation and the number of applications received in a given year.

Use of Funds

The funds are to be used to cover expenses directly incurred by the faculty member.

Eligible Expenses

Costs for the following have been viewed as eligible: travel and other expenses related to conferences, conventions, and workshops; travel to libraries and research collections; materials for special projects; equipment*; student work stipends; organizing a campus event. The Committee will also consider requests outside of this description if accompanied by a full explanation of the project.

*please note that if equipment is purchased for the project it remains the property of the Mellon Grant until Spring 2017; after that the equipment becomes the property of the faculty member’s department

Financial Gain

Should a faculty member gain financially from the proposed project (advances, royalties, etc.), funds provided by the grant should be returned.

Applications

Submit your application by filling out the form below and sending it to Kimberly Rhodes, Art History Department (krhodes@drew.edu, DOYO 113D, Ext. 3757).  Please provide all of the information requested.  Incomplete applications will not be considered.  An applicant may be requested to provide more details than contained in the initial application if members of the Mellon Advisory Committee deem this necessary.

Payment of Grant Expenses

The faculty member will be reimbursed upon presentation of original receipts.

Submission of Receipts

Receipts for all grant expenses, accompanied by the final grant report, should be submitted to Kimberly Rhodes (krhodes@drew.edu, DOYO 113D, Ext. 3757) upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted.  Grant expenses will not be reimbursed until the report is submitted.  IRS regulations provide that research grant funds are taxable as income to the recipient unless grant recipients submit receipts for all expenditures related to the grant, including copies of personal checks when appropriate. Receipts for travel must be provided in accordance with the University Travel Regulations.

Reports

Upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted grant recipients must submit a brief report along with their receipts,. Grant recipients may also be asked to participate in a public event held on campus at the end of the academic year to reflect on the progress of the initiative.

Report Format

Reports should include:

  • A brief description of the activities completed;
  • An accounting of expenditures
  • A brief description of outcomes in relation to The Arts and the Common Good initiative (will you be integrating new interdisciplinary ideas into your teaching? have you found new avenues for research? will you collaborate with an arts department on campus or an outside arts organization? have you organized a campus event?).

Prospectus and Application

Mellon Arts and the Common Good Faculty Mini Grant

Course Development Mini-Grant

Purpose

The Mellon funded multi-year initiative The Arts and the Common Good seeks to illustrate the various ways in which the arts – in concert and dialogue with other areas of exploration and knowledge – help us understand what the common good is (and what it is not), how we can achieve this good, and what we must do to strengthen, expand, and sustain it. The course development grants are designed to engage faculty in disciplines outside of the arts with this endeavor and promote interdisciplinary exploration of such themes as “the arts and invention/generation,” “the arts and public discourse,” “the arts and risk,” “the arts and imagination,” “the arts and difference,” and “the arts and the communication of ideas” through course development across the curriculum.

Eligibility

Grants may be awarded to members of the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts teaching in disciplines outside of the arts (except in the case of collaborative grants). Collaborative grants that include two faculty members (one of which may be in an arts discipline) who will team teach a course will also be considered. When the Mellon Advisory Committee considers applications, priority will be given to applications from tenured or tenure-track faculty, followed by full-time non-tenure-track faculty, and then part-time faculty.

Deadlines

April 1, 2016 for summer 2016 (after June 30) or fall 2016

November 1, 2016 for spring 2017

Funding Amount

A maximum of $1,800 per request or $1,800 per faculty member in the case of collaborative grants.  The Mellon Advisory Committee sets the funding limit and reviews it periodically.  The limit may vary according to the size of the budgetary allocation and the number of applications received in a given year.

Use of Funds

The funds are to be used to cover expenses directly incurred by the faculty member.

Eligible Expenses

Costs for the following have been viewed as eligible: travel and other expenses related to conferences, conventions, and workshops that will aid in course development; travel to libraries and research collections; other materials for course development (books, media materials, etc.).

Applications

Submit your application by filling out the form below and sending it to Kimberly Rhodes, Art History Department (krhodes@drew.edu, DOYO 113D, Ext. 3757).  Please provide all of the information requested.  Incomplete applications will not be considered.  An applicant may be requested to provide more details than contained in the initial application if members of the Mellon Advisory Committee deem this necessary.

Payment of Grant Expenses

The faculty member will be reimbursed upon presentation of original receipts.

Submission of Receipts

Receipts for all grant expenses, accompanied by the final grant report, should be submitted to Kimberly Rhodes (krhodes@drew.edu, DOYO 113D, Ext. 3757) upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted.  Grant expenses will not be reimbursed until the report is submitted.  IRS regulations provide that research grant funds are taxable as income to the recipient unless grant recipients submit receipts for all expenditures related to the grant, including copies of personal checks when appropriate. Receipts for travel must be provided in accordance with the University Travel Regulations.

Reports

Upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted grant recipients must submit a brief report along with their receipts,. Grant recipients may also be asked to participate in a public event held on campus at the end of the academic year to reflect on the progress of the initiative.

Report Format

Reports should include:

  • A brief description of the activities completed
  • An accounting of expenditures
  • A brief description of outcomes in relation to The Arts and the Common Good initiative, including information about when the new course will be offered to students

Prospectus and Application

Mellon Arts and the Common Good Faculty Course Development Mini Grant

Faculty-Mentored Student Research Grant

Purpose

The Mellon funded multi-year initiative The Arts and the Common Good seeks to illustrate the various ways in which the arts – in concert and dialogue with other areas of exploration and knowledge – help us understand what the common good is (and what it is not), how we can achieve this good, and what we must do to strengthen, expand, and sustain it. The faculty-mentored student research grants are designed to support collaborative projects between students and faculty on environmental, scientific, psychological, political, social justice, and community issues that include/impact the arts in some way. These projects could take the form of traditional research leading towards publication or conference presentation; an exhibition or performance; a symposium or lecture series; a film series; or other public program. Although the research is meant to happen in the summer, the final project could be presented during the academic year.

Eligibility

Grants may be awarded to members of the faculty and students of the College of Liberal Arts. When the Mellon Advisory Committee considers applications, priority will be given to applications from tenured or tenure-track faculty, followed by full-time non-tenure-track faculty, and then part-time faculty.

Deadlines

April 1, 2016 for Summer 2016 and academic year 2016-17

Funding Amount

$2,500 stipend for student; $2,500 for faculty mentor; $2,500 for research/project costs, including travel, materials, conference attendance, etc.

Applications

Submit your application by filling out the form below and sending it to Kimberly Rhodes, Art History Department (krhodes@drew.edu) no later than March 23, 2015.  Please provide all of the information requested.  Incomplete applications will not be considered.  An applicant may be requested to provide more details than contained in the initial application if members of the Mellon Advisory Committee deem this necessary.

Submission of Receipts

Receipts for all grant expenses, accompanied by the final grant report, should be submitted to Kimberly Rhodes (DOYO 113D, Ext. 3757) upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted.  Grant expenses will not be reimbursed until the report is submitted.  IRS regulations provide that research grant funds are taxable as income to the recipient unless grant recipients submit receipts for all expenditures related to the grant, including copies of personal checks when appropriate. Receipts for travel must be provided in accordance with the University Travel Regulations.

Reports

Upon completion of the grant activity and no later than the end of the semester for which the funding was granted grant recipients must submit a brief report along with their receipts. Grant recipients may also be asked to participate in a public event held on campus at the end of the academic year to reflect on the progress of the initiative.

Report format

Reports should include:

  • A brief description of the activities completed;
  • An accounting of expenditures
  • A brief description of outcomes in relation to The Arts and the Common Good initiative (will you be integrating new interdisciplinary ideas into your teaching? have you found new avenues for research? will you collaborate with an arts department on campus or an outside arts organization? have you organized a campus event?).

Prospectus and Application

Mellon Arts and the Common Good Faculty-Mentored Student Research Grant

Recipients

Summer and Fall 2014

  • Lee Arnold (Art) and Minjoon Kouh (Physics): funding to support the development of an interactive video display with art and science students
  • Di Bai (GRCA): funding to support student visit to 798 Arts District in Beijing – presentation about the trip
  • Lisa Brenner (Theatre & Dance) and Susan Rakosi Rosenbloom (Sociology): funding to support programming related to “Too Big” student production
  • Louis Hamilton (Comparative Religion): funding to support research of edicole sacre in Rome
  • Karen Pechilis (Comparative Religion): funding to support a series of co-curricular events with the course, REL 260/Religion and Culture: India, to be taught fall 2014. The title of the project is: “The arts and the public communication of cultural heritage.”

January and Spring 2015

  • Lisa Brenner (Theatre & Dance) with Center for Civic Engagement: commission Evelyn Diaz Cruz to create an original play with and about the Newark Community
  • Edmond Chang (English): support to participate in panels on gender and video games and Brad Pitt at the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association conference
  • Louis Hamilton (Comparative Religion): research in Rome to support the project The End of the Sacred City: Street Devotion in Rome, from Antiquity to the Present
  • Rita Keane (Art History) and Maria Masucci (Anthropology): Museums and Society course programming
  • Elizabeth Kimball (English): Language/Diversity/Creativity Symposium Community Language and Literacy Website
  • Minjoon Kouh (Physics): Korean Drumming Club

Summer and Fall 2015

  • Ebenezer Obiri Addo (Pan African Studies): research in Ghana on  the indigenous religious shrine at Lateh
  • Louis Hamilton (Comparative Religion): faculty-mentored student research grant
  • Summer Harrison (English and Environmental Studies and Sustainability): presentation of research on community-based learning pedagogy in classes that combine environmental knowledge and engagement with art
  • Wendy Kolmar (English): course development grant
  • Minjoon Kouh (Physics): faculty-mentored student research grant Drew Timelapse Compilation Video
  • Patrick Phillips (English): research in Georgia for nonfiction book on history of ethnic cleansing in Forsyth County
  • Giandomenico Sarolli (Economics): faculty-mentored student research grant
  • Leslie Sprout (Music): course development grant

January and Spring 2016

  • Ebenezer Obiri Addo (Pan African Studies): research in Ghana on the religious shrine at Lateh
  • Lisa Brenner (Theatre and Dance): senior capstone project with Chisa Hutchinson and Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey
  • Summer Harrison (English & Environmental Studies and Sustainability): research on Appalachian literature and environmental activism
  • Ahni Kruger (Art): course development grant, The Arts of Peace and Conflict
  • Kesha Moore (Sociology): public program on The Fabric of Complicity exhibition

Summer and Fall 2016

  • Ebenezer Obiri Addo: research on music in shrine culture at the Lateh shrine in Ghana
  • Lee Arnold (Art): course development grant & residency at the Montello Foundation (http://www.montellofoundation.org)
  • Lisa Brenner & Chris Ceraso (Theatre and Dance): faculty-mentored student research project with senior capstone group
  • Jill Cermele (Psychology): exhibition of collages created by students in the course Gender Violence and Women’s Resistance curated by Dr. Martha McCaughey
  • Bai Di (Chinese): course development grant to create art components for two courses, Meeting China’s Millennials- Understanding China’s Youth Culture and China’s Urbanization Progress and Problems
  • Louis Hamilton (Comparative Religion): faculty-mentored student research grant for sacred shrines in Rome
  • Emily Hill (Computer Science): faculty-mentored student research grant for developing software to analyze Shakespeare’s texts
  • Ryan Hinrichs (Chemistry & Environmental Studies and Sustainability): faculty-mentored student research grant on the chemical history of photography
  • Jason Karolak (Art): course development grant
  • Elizabeth Kimball (English): course development grant, Nineteenth-Century Rhetorics from the Margins
  • Jennifer Kohn & GianDomenico Sarolli (Economics and Business): course development grant & faculty-mentored student research grant
  • Minjoon Kouh (Physics): create arts component for “Science and Technology in South Korea” shortTREC
  • Kesha Moore (Sociology): course development grant, public art in Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Kesha Moore & Susan Rosenbloom (Sociology): faculty-mentored student research grant for asset mapping in Orange, NJ
  • Elizabeth Myers (English): public lecture by Dr. Edmond Chang on feminist Young Adult dystopias
  • Karen Pechilis & Louis Hamilton (Comparative Religion): course development grant, Sacred New York: Buildings, Communities, Pluralism
  • Rebecca Soderholm (Art): research for DSEM Exposure Values: Questions in Contemporary Photography & faculty-mentored student research grant for photography book
  • Carol Ueland (Russian): course development grant to create a component on the arts of the Ukraine for Russian, East European and Eurasian Culture
  • Sara Webb (Biology & Environmental Studies and Sustainability): environmental art initiative for the Drew University Forest Preserve