Drew’s comprehensive Campus Crime Statistics Report is filed with the U.S. Department of Education and is available online via the Campus Safety Report Web page. The report is required by all colleges and universities under provisions of the Clery Act.

The majority of the cases handled by this department are non-criminal matters, such as, medical emergencies, motor vehicle accidents, fire alarms, reports of theft and property loss and other public service calls.

Most lost or stolen property cases on campus can best be described as “thefts of opportunity;” for example, money left out in the open, bicycles left unlocked, and computers left unattended.

Information on public safety matters, including any crimes, is reported on our department website and the department maintains information to be in compliance with the Clery Act. Monthly statistics on Public Safety calls are provided to the student newspaper, the Acorn. Additionally, Chief Lucid provides information by voice or e-mail to members of the Drew community when necessary or appropriate.

Students are encouraged to ask questions. If The Department of Public Safety has the information you are seeking, it is our policy is to make sure the information is provided to you quickly and accurately.

Annual Campus Security Report
Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security and Campus Crime Statistics

Your Safety Is Our Priority

Drew University is concerned about the safety and welfare of its students, faculty and staff, and visitors, and is committed to providing a safe and secure campus. Drew University has very little serious crime, but the potential exists. Therefore, with the help of the Department of Public Safety, students, staff and faculty can adopt measures aimed at protecting both themselves and their property. Because no campus is isolated from crime, Drew University has implemented policies and procedures designed to protect all persons on the campus. In addition, the Department of Public Safety has developed projects and programs focused at maintaining safety and security.

Located in suburban Madison, NJ, Drew University strives to have one of the safest campuses in the nation. Its 186 acres are wooded, private, and peaceful and surrounded on three sides by local neighborhoods consisting primarily of single-family homes and condominiums built for Drew faculty and families.

Bordering the campus is the town of Madison, a community of 16,000 persons with a vital downtown, an excellent police force, and a low crime rate.

Drew takes public safety seriously. In fact, a major reason the campus is so safe for our 2,000 students, and 450 faculty and staff, is that our efforts to maintain campus safety have been long-standing and ongoing. Long before campus crime became an issue, we began implementing programs to make Drew a safe place to live and learn.

We have taken a number of steps to insure that our campus remains safe. Most recently, we completed installation of a new electronic entry system in all undergraduate residence halls. The new proximity system increases the safety of students and makes it difficult for anyone other than a Drew student to enter a residence hall.

Instead of a key, each student has an ID Card with a unique code that activates a “reader” that opens the door and allows the student to enter the building. If someone props a door open, an alarm sounds until the door is closed.

Drew is diligent in maintaining the university’s buildings and grounds, with special concern for safety and security. Repairs of a safety and security nature are made promptly. For example, outdoor lights are checked on a regular basis to insure that burned out or damaged bulbs are replaced quickly.

In addition, each year classroom buildings and residence halls are inspected by an outside expert to insure that the buildings meet state and federal fire code. Defects are given priority and repaired promptly.

The Drew community is tied together by a state-of-the-art communications network that links everyone on campus. At Drew, everyone has a telephone and personal computer. As a consequence, should it be necessary to provide students with emergency alert information, that information may be sent to them in seconds via e-mail and voice mail. Anyone may report an emergency or request help instantly by dialing 911 or Extension 4444 from any campus phone or 973-408-4444 from any mobile phone.

To keep the university community informed, the Department of Public Safety maintains a weekly report of incidents on campus on its intranet web site that is available to students and other members of the Drew community only. The Department of Public Safety also posts on its general access web site a report of annual crime statistics and immediate crime alert bulletins.

This report highlights the initiatives of the Department of Public Safety and provides crime statistics for the years 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. These statistics represent certain reported crimes that occurred on campus during these times. A crime and fire log is maintained for view at the dispatch desk.


A. Our Department of Public Safety

Message from the Chief

Dear Students and Parents:

Drew University, the “University in the Forest”, is dedicated to providing its students with a safe and secure environment in which to pursue their educational goals. One of the major reasons for Drew’s excellent record is the fact that it is located in Madison, a community that enjoys one of the lowest crime rates in New Jersey. But the primary reason is the on-going cooperation of the University community with the Department of Public Safety.

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for providing an environment that is safe for all members of the Drew community. This responsibility includes crime prevention, fire safety, and educating students as to how they can contribute to a safe campus. Every member of the Drew community must share the responsibility for maintaining a safe and secure campus.

This website provides basic information on subjects that are of primary concern to students and to the Department of Public Safety. It also includes public safety statistics for Drew in fulfillment of the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.

Sincerely,

Robert C. Lucid
Director of Public Safety
Phone: (973) 408-3379

About the Department

The Department of Public Safety consists of a Director, 12 Patrol  Officers, 4 Dispatchers, and 1 Administrative Assistant  providing 24-hours-a-day service to the Drew community.  Our responsibilities include crime prevention and investigation, fire safety, traffic regulation, enforcement of university regulations and state and local laws. Professionally trained men and women patrol the campus in marked patrol cars, on foot and on bicycles. Officers are certified in:

  • CPR
  • Emergency Response
  • Emergency Medical Technician
  • Defibrillation

Patrol Officers within the department are required to complete a basic training course provided by New Jersey police academies. In addition to this training, officers continually receive in-service training and attend special training sessions provided by county and state police academies. Since 2002, all officers are trained as National Registry EMT’s or as Emergency First Responders. One or more officers are certified to teach Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) classes, NJ Defensive Driving classes, and are certified by the American Red Cross as CPR instructors. Periodically throughout the academic year we offer such classes free of charge or for a nominal fee to Drew community members. Our highly trained staff also offers Basic 9-1-1 Telecommunications and Emergency Medical Dispatch to other agencies each year.

The philosophy of this department is based on a commitment to community service. Members of this department are sensitive to the special needs of students as well as their responsibility to provide a secure living environment.

Since the campus also falls under the jurisdiction of the Madison Police Department, this department works in close cooperation with the Madison Police concerning certain criminal investigations, traffic accidents or other police matters. Under the direction of the Chief of Police, cooperation between Madison Police and the University is consistently excellent. Uniform crime reporting and some criminal investigations are handled by the Madison Police Department.

The Department of Public Safety strives to serve the Drew community. Our headquarters is located in the Pepin Service Building. We encourage you to visit anytime.

    • Chief of Public Safety, Robert C. Lucid
      • Judi Rosenbaum, Administrative Assistant
    • Operations Lieutenant, Fabio G. LaManna
      • Detective Sergeant, Carol Simmons
      • Detective Sergeant, Jordan Mitchell Jr.
      • Corporal, Jesse Traynor
      • Corporal, Timothy Goldate
        • Patrol Officer, Altin Celoaliaj
        • Patrol Officer, Frank Riker
        • Patrol Officer, Daniel O’Keefe
        • Patrol Officer, Edward O’Donnell
        • Patrol Officer, Lusian Bozo
        • Patrol Officer, Michael Doyle
        • Patrol Officer, Kimberly Garcia
          • Communications Officer,  Gerard Ramos
          • Communications Officer,  Kevin Herbert
          • Communications Officer, Daniel Fucito

B. In An Effort to Help

Fire Alarms

Smoke detectors and fire extinguishers have been strategically placed in all residence halls to protect life and property. The sophisticated alarm system is monitored 24 hours a day. Public Safety personnel are dispatched and respond immediately to any alarm condition. We value your privacy as well as your safety. Every attempt will be made to turn off the warning horns as soon as it has been ascertained that no danger exists.

Vandalizing the alarm system, covering smoke detectors or illegally discharging fire extinguishers are serious offenses. Every effort will be made to identify persons who compromise public safety through such acts. Offenders will be referred to the Dean of Student Life for appropriate disciplinary action.

In compliance with state regulations, twice during each academic year the Department of Public Safety and the Office of Residence Life conduct fire drills in all residential areas, requiring complete evacuation.

Inspections/Health and Safety

In order to maintain a healthy, safe environment in the residence halls, the Office of Residence Life conducts room inspection several times during a semester. Fines are imposed for violations (such as possession of party lights, candles, prohibited pets) and other infractions (for example, alcohol in a room whose occupants are underage). Fines may be imposed for each infraction.

Escorts

The Department of Public Safety provides escorts on request for students, faculty and staff during evening hours when a person would feel safer by having a patrol officer’s escort. Transportation to and from classes is provided for students who need such service because of medical problems.

Escorts to the Madison train station for students, staff and faculty with luggage or for medical reasons are only given when there is an officer available. For escorts to the train station, community members are strongly encouraged to contact a local cab company.

Sexual Assault

Department of Public Safety staff are aware that sexual assault and rape are among the most traumatizing of all crimes. All of our officers understand that proper treatment of victims in these cases is of the utmost importance. In-service training, discussions and input from faculty and students is part of the process that the Department of Public Safety uses to prepare our officers to deal with these crimes. If such crimes occur they will be handled with confidentiality and sensitivity and the victim will be given the full support of this department. For further information regarding policies and procedures for dealing with sexual assault, consult Daniel’s Dictionary and Student Handbook.

Substance Abuse

The advent of a new law in 1983 in New Jersey makes it illegal for those under the age of 21 to purchase, possess or consume alcohol. Likewise, it is illegal for persons of legal age to purchase alcohol for those under 21. University regulations do not permit bulk quantities of alcoholic beverages (such as kegs and beer balls) in residence halls. Also, the University upholds state laws regarding the use, sale or possession of drugs. All students are expected to be acquainted with and to abide by state and University regulations regarding the consumption of alcohol and other drugs. Public Safety will strictly enforce the policies of the University. Persons in violation may be subject to both criminal sanctions and civil liability under state law in addition to University disciplinary procedures. Individuals who get into trouble at Drew because of alcohol abuse are mandated to attend a five-session educational seminar sponsored by the Counseling Center. During this seminar, these individuals will learn about alcohol and its effects. The Counseling Center also has programs for those with drug abuse problems and can provide referrals to outside agencies.

A Substance Awareness Counselor (SAC) helps students accomplish their personal and academic goals through education, prevention, and remediation as related to the
use of alcohol and/or other drugs. This is accomplished in the following ways:

  • Intervention and Prevention:
    The SAC can assess a student’s use of alcohol/other substances to determine if a problem (or potential problem) exists. Individual and group counseling would be provided or, if necessary, referral to an off-campus program.
  • Campus Education:
    The SAC provides programs in the residence halls and collaborates with RAs, RDs, the Peer Assistance and Referral Service (PAR), and Bacchus to design and implement preventive programs. She consults with various departments on campus in regard to alcohol/ drugs and assists with non-alcoholic social events, co-sponsors Alcohol Awareness Week, and provides literature and referral information to the Drew community.
  • Community Involvement:
    The SAC is an active participant in off-campus programs and organizations. You do not have to have an alcohol/drug problem to meet with and talk to the SAC. Among other reasons, a desire for information, a concern about others, or a willingness to help with programs are valid reasons to visit the coordinator. There is no fee for services.

Prohibited Items

To protect the health and welfare of the University community, the following articles are prohibited in residence halls:

  • Firearms and objects of all kinds with the potential to cause bodily harm, including (but not limited to) guns, BB guns, knives, bows and arrows, paintball guns, and martial arts equipment
  • Fireworks, explosives, incense, candles; volatile liquids and substances of any kind, including (but not limited to) fuels, lighter fluid, open cans of paint, paint thinner, and turpentine
  • Extension cords or “outlet expanders” (with the exception of surge protectors); surge protectors are allowed, but one may not be plugged into another.
  • Decorative lighting (such as holiday lights, neon signs, paper lamps)
  • Halogen lamps
  • Illegal or non-prescribed drugs and drug paraphernalia
  • Hookahs
  • Kegs, beer balls, and other alcoholic beverages in bulk quantities. Empty containers, funnels, or other paraphernalia used for bingeing purposes will be considered illegal also and owners/room occupants are subject to fines.
  • Motorcycles, mopeds, or motor bikes
  • Any appliance exceeding 500 watts (except hair dryers used in bathroom facilities)
  • Refrigerators with built-in taps and/or internal dimensions larger than 4 cu. ft. or starting current exceeding 7 amps. Each resident may have one small refrigerator.
  • Microwave ovens, microwave-refrigerator combo (other than University-issued), hot plates, deep-fat fryers, toasters, open-flame or open-coil appliances, George Foreman grills, waffle irons, quesadilla makers, and hot pots
  • Air conditioners, space heaters, ceiling fans, washing machines, dryers, freezers, or other high-voltage equipment
  • Waterbeds, pools
  • Pets, except for non-meat-eating fish
  • University furniture other than that provided at the beginning of the year
  • Unapproved lofts
  • Alcohol if under the age of 21
  • Items on exterior window ledges
  • Weight-lifting equipment of more than 20 lbs.
  • Rollerblades, scooters, bicycles, etc. riding in hallways
  • Hall sports (i.e. catch played in the hallways)
  • Water balloons and snowballs inside the halls

C. Staying Safe and Secure – Programs to Help

Crime Prevention

Property thefts and vandalism are a continuing problem on college campuses, and one which will not be easily solved. But you can help by becoming aware of crime prevention and security measures.

The following suggestions are offered to help protect yourself and your property:

  • Never leave purses, keys, backpacks or other personal property unattended in offices, dining areas, classrooms or the library.
  • Lock your room, apartment or office door even if you “just step out for a minute.”
  • Don’t leave valuables, purses, or money in plain view in parked vehicles.
  • Participate in operation identification by engraving your driver’s license number on your valuables. Contact the Department of Public Safety at 973-408-3379.
  • If you see suspicious persons or activity in or around university buildings, call Public Safety at x3379.
  • Remember the tips line for leaving confidential information: Tips hotline: x5656
  • Report any criminal activity as soon as possible! Timely information helps in our investigations.

Campus Safety Seminars

Drew Department of Public Safety officers are available to speak to any concerned individuals or groups at any time. Meetings are often scheduled through resident assistants early in the academic year to help create campus safety awareness and answer questions.

Periodically throughout the year academic year, officers hold classes for Drew community members. These include Defensive Driving, Fire Safety, and Rape Aggression Defense. These classes are taught by officers carrying all necessary instructor certifications. Classes are open to all community members and are free of charge (with the exception of any fees required by outside agencies providing attendance certification).

CERT TeamDrew University C.E.R.T. Team

Drew University CERT instructors have trained over 40 community members to be certified as a C.E.R.T. team. The Community Emergency Response Team can come together to help in times of disaster or any type of emergency. Drew’s instructor is Corporal Traynor. For more information contact the Department of Public Safety between 9am – 5pm Monday – Friday.

R.A.D. – Rape Aggression Defense Course

The Rape Aggression Defense System is a program of realistic self-defense tactics and techniques for women. The R.A.D. System is a comprehensive, women-only course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and risk avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training. R.A.D. is not a Martial Arts program. Our courses are taught by nationally certified R.A.D. Instructors provide each student with a workbook/reference manual. Drew’s instructors are Corporal Jesse Traynor and Officer Tracey Barmore. For more information contact the Department of Public Safety between 9am – 5pm Monday – Friday.

Community First Aid & C.P.R.

The Department has two officers certified by the Red Cross to instruct basic first aid and C.P.R. (cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation) and Automatic Electric Defibrillators. Upon successful completion of this class, participants will be able to perform Adult, Child and infant C.P.R. and assist someone in a medical emergency until help arrives.  We have initiated a student organized Drew First Responder Club that rides and responds to medical emergencies on campus on weekend nights.

Defensive Driving Course

The department has two officers certified by the New Jersey Safety Council to instruct an eight hour course in Defensive driving. The course includes reviewing some rules of the road that they have learned before and some that are not known. The instructors also give tips for foul weather driving and other driving hazards. People that complete this course will receive at least a 5 % discount and can get 2 points off of your record.

Basic 9-1-1 Dispatch & EMD (Emergency Medical Dispatch)

All officers and dispatchers are trained as Basic 9-1-1 Emergency Tele-Communicators and as Emergency Medical Dispatchers.  We dispatch our own emergency response units to calls received on campus and communicate with outside response units for coordinated response, including Advanced Life Support.

Bicycle Patrol Unit

The Drew University Department of Public Safety has always been on the cutting edge of new technology and patrol methods. Whether it’s with state of the art equipment or our inherent desire to serve the Drew community as best we can, it is our philosophy that officers in the field should be as approachable as possible. One of the latest and most effective ways of achieving this goal is by placing patrol officers on bicycles. This hands-on approach to patrol has many advantages, including easier interaction with members of the public and access to areas not usually accessible by vehicle. Community policing studies have also shown that members of the public are more inclined to approach an officer on a bicycle than in a vehicle when they have a problem.

The Bike Owner’s Survival Guide

Bike theft is the fastest growing crime at college campuses across the country.

With costs of bikes often ranging between $400 and $600, students lose thousands of dollars worth of property to bike thieves each year. This page is intended to give you the “street smarts” to avoid being a victim.

Bike thefts on the Drew campus usually fall into one of four categories:

  • The unlocked bike of questionable value that is “borrowed” for a quick means of transportation and the “borrower” forgets to return it.
  • The bike locked with an inexpensive lock that the thief cuts with bolt cutters. The bike is then ridden away and probably sold for a fraction of its cost.
  • The expensive mountain bike, locked to itself with a good lock, that is carried to a waiting car. The thief then cuts the lock with a torch and sells the bike at “low overhead” sale prices.
  • The unlocked bike that is left around, which can quickly be ridden away or thrown into car.

D. The Importance of Communication

Medical Emergencies

Report all medical emergencies to the Department of Public Safety by dialing 911 or 4444 from any on campus land line phone or 973-408-4444 from any mobile phone. The officer at the Dispatch Desk at Pepin is in direct contact with the Madison First Aid Squad and Drew’s own patrols.

Reporting a Crime

If you become a victim of and/or witness to a crime, immediately report the incident to the Department of Public Safety. The sooner a crime is reported, the better the chances that we sill solve the crime, apprehend the suspect and recover any property that may have been taken.

To report a crime call the Department of Public Safety at 973-408-3379. For emergencies dial 911 or 4444 from any on campus land line phone or 973-408-4444 from any mobile phone. Once an incident has been reported, an officer will be dispatched to your location to begin the investigation of the crime.

Connect-ED

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to register for Blackboard Connect by logging onto the Drew website and clicking on “emergency notification system” to register. The service allows the University the ability to send alerts via phone to all subscribers regarding emergency situations, school closings and other University events.

Timely Notice

The Department of Public Safety will publish a crime alert within 24 hours of an incident to aid in the prevention of similar crimes. The notice will apply to all crimes listed in the Clery Act as well as other actions effecting the safety of the campus. An e-mail will be sent to the entire Drew community.

Crime Log

In compliance with federal law, the Drew University Department of Public Safety maintains a crime log that provides a list of all crimes that occur on campus that have been reported. The crime log is updated daily. The crime log may be reviewed at the Public Safety Office 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Emergency Response Plan

The Department of Public Safety, in cooperation with local authorities, designed a set of standard operating procedures to guide our response to an active shooter on campus. The objectives are to minimize the risk to uninvolved students, faculty and staff; clear the area; and assist local authorities in resolving the situation. Chief Lucid has conducted training sessions for resident directors and assistants, and will be holding sessions for faculty and staff. This active shooter plan has been added to the university’s emergency response manual, which contains response procedures for a wide range of scenarios. The university’s Risk Management Committee maintains this manual and meets regularly throughout the year to anticipate and respond to emergency management issues.


E. Clery Act Statistics

The crimes listed below are mandated by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act to be reported and distributed annually on October 1 through the department’s annual report to all current students, faculty and staff. The statistics gathered for this report include all reported crimes in these categories to the police department, incidents that occurred on public property surrounding the campus, and incidents not reported to the police that may have been reported confidentially to a campus security authority. The report also contains statistics for arrests and referrals to the campus judicial process for liquor law violations, drug abuse violations, and weapon law violations.

Federal law also requires that all hate crime in the mandated categories be reported. Those crimes are further categorized by the nature of the bias, i.e. race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity and disability.

 

Drew Crime Statistics

The following information pertaining to specific crime categories and geographic areas is reported annually to the Department of Education in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

Table 1: Criminal Offenses on Campus

Title 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 1 1 3 3 4
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 2
Burglary 9 1 0 39 39
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 1 0 1 1
Arson 1 1 0 0 0

Table 2: Criminal Offenses Occurring in Residence Halls

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 1 1 3 4 2
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 4 0 0 36 15
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0

Note: In 2012, an Arson was committed in an Acidemic (non-residence)  building, which is under investigation.

Table 3: Criminal Offenses in Non-Campus Buildings

(see geographic area definitions)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0

Table 4: Criminal Offenses on Public Property

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0

Table 5: Criminal Offenses on Campus  - Hate Crimes

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0 0 0

Table 6: Criminal Offenses In Residence Halls – Hate Crimes

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0 0 0

Table 7: Criminal Offenses In Non Campus Buildings – Hate Crimes

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0 0 0

Table 8: Criminal Offenses On Public Property – Hate Crimes

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0 0 0

Table 9: Arrests On Campus

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 3 3 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 1 1 12 9 8
Illegal Weapons Possessions 1 1 0 0 0

Table 10: Arrests in Residence Hall

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 1 11 12 4 7
Illegal Weapons Possessions 1 0 0 0 0

Table 11: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Crimes On Campus

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 339 326 287 258 323
Drug Law violations 29 97 90 98 93
Illegal Weapons Possessions 2 0 1 1 2

Table 12: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Crimes in Residence Halls

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 339 326 287 216 286
Drug Law violations 29 97 90 68 62
Illegal Weapons Possessions 2 0 1 0 1

Table 13: Arrests at Non-Campus Buildings

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0 0 0

Table 14: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Non-Campus Buildings

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0 0 0

Table 15: Arrests on Public Property

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 1 0 0 0

Table 16: Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals on Public Property

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0 0 0

Crime Definitions and Codes from the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife or other weapon is used that could or probably would result in a serious potential injury if the crime were successfully completed. UCR code 13A

ARSON: The willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal property of another kind. UCR code 20O

BURGLARY: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or a felony, breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking, safecracking, and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. UCR code 22O

DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives, e.g. (morphine, heroin, codeine), marijuana, synthetic narcotics, e.g. (Demerol, methadone), and dangerous nonnarcotic drugs, e.g. (barbiturates, Benzedrine). UCR code 35A

HATE CRIME: A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against persons, property or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by an offender’s bias against an individual or a group’s perceived race, religion, ethnic/national origin, gender, age, disability or sexual orientation.

LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places, bootlegging, operating a still, furnishing liquor to minor or intemperate person, using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor, drinking on a train
or public conveyance, all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.) UCR code 90G

MURDER (NON-NEGLIGENT HOMICIDE): The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. UCR code 09A

MANSLAUGHTER (NEGLIGENT): The killing of another person through gross negligence. UCR code 09B

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classified as motor vehicle theft are all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access, even though the vehicles are later abandoned; this includes joy riding.) UCR code 24O

ROBBERY: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or putting the victim in fear. UCR code 12O

WEAPON LAW VIOLATIONS: The violation of laws or ordinance dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapon to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. UCR code 52O

Sex Offense Definitions and Codes From the National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program

SEX OFFENSES – FORCIBLE: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will, or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

(a) FORCIBLE RAPE (UCR code 11A) The carnal knowledge of a person, forcible and/or against the person’s will, or not forcibly or against that person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because or his/her temporary or permanent or physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth).

(b) FORCIBLE SODOMY (UCR code 11B) Oral or anal intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

(c) SEXUAL ASSAULT WITH AN OBJECT (UCR code 11C) The use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and /or against that person’s will, or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

(d) FORCIBLE FONDLING (UCR code 11D) The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will, or, not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent
mental incapacity.

SEX OFFENSES – NON-FORCIBLE: Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse.

(a) INCEST (UCR code 36A) Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

(b) STATUTORY RAPE (UCR code 36B) Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.