For Fall 2013

This checklist should be used for students who either do not have SAT/ACT scores or who believe their SAT/ACT scores did not place them in the correct section of WRTG.

The following checklist asks you a series of questions about your experience with writing, as well as what you think of two passages we provide you with.  You will see that many of the questions are designed to help us understand how you write, what kind of writing education you have had in the past, and what your attitude toward writing is.  Please answer the questions as best you can, and remember that our placement process only works if you provide us with answers that are as honest as possible.

After you complete this Checklist, it will be sent to your email. Please keep this email to share your Checklist with your advisor at either June Orientation or at your Alternative Orientation session.

The following is an excerpted passage from the article “When a College Professor and a High School Teacher Read the Same Papers” by Tom Thompson and Andrea Gallagher. The article discusses many of the differences between the situations students and teachers face in high school vs. college. Toward the end of the article, Thompson and Gallagher discuss what they agree to be the difference between a competent and a sophisticated essay. Please read the following passage and then answer the questions below:

There is clearly a difference between competent writing and sophisticated writing. A competent paper will respond directly to the assignment and show command of the subject, either through synthesis of adequate research materials or as a result of authentic experience. A competent paper will have an introduction, conclusion, and some logical (if perhaps predictable) flow of ideas in the middle. A competent paper will be free of errors in conventions (grammar, mechanics, and usage) that require the reader to reread in order to construct meaning. And while a competent paper doesn’t require rereading, a sophisticated paper invites it: that is, a sophisticated paper is one that the reader wants to reread. Word choice and sentence variety are used to bring out the voice of the writer, ideas are expressed with insight, and the organization subtly moves the reader from one idea to the next.

Below is a passage from the article “Annoying Ways People Use Sources” by writing instructor Kyle Stedman. In the article Stedman discusses different ways that students can more efficiently incorporate quotes into their college-level essay. The specific excerpt we provide you with here shows you one of Stedman’s tips, as well as an example from one of his students’ writing. Please read the passage and then answer the questions below:

The easiest way to effectively massage in quotations is by purposefully returning to each one in your draft to see if you set the stage for your readers—often, by signaling that a quote is about to come, stating who the quote came from, and showing how your readers should interpret it…[This] could be done by introducing the quotation with something like this…:

We should all be prepared with a backup plan if a zombie invasion occurs. Max Brooks suggests a number of ways to prepare for zombies’ particular traits, though he underestimates the ability of humans to survive in harsh environments. For example, he writes, “Unlike its human counterparts, an army of zombies is completely independent of support” (115). His shortsightedness could have a number of consequences…

Section B

Below are descriptions for the 4 different writing courses offered at Drew. Please read each one carefully and then select which course you believe will be the best match for you.

Writing 101: ESOL is a writing class for speakers of other languages. WRTG 101 extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled, and also includes small group work with trained writing fellows. The writing fellows provide additional instruction and support for students as they draft and revise their papers. In this course, students explore and practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and analyze the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. This course pays special attention to the distinct needs of ESOL learners. Students who take WRTG 101 in the Fall must register for WRTG 110 in the Spring.

Writing 102: Fundamentals extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled, and also includes small group, instructor-led recitation sessions to provide additional instruction and support for students as they draft and revise their papers. In this course, students explore and practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and analyze the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. Students who take WRTG 102 in the Fall must register for WRTG 115 in the Spring. Enrollment limit: College Writing Plus is capped at 12 students to ensure opportunity for one-on-one work.

Writing 103: extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled. They read and respond to texts written for a variety of audiences and explore the style, vocabulary, and structure of those texts, along with the impact of audience and purpose. Students are introduced to academic research. Students who earn a C- or above will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement; all others must enroll in WRTG 115 in the Spring.

Writing 104: Advanced extends the sense of intellectual community developed in the College Seminars in which students are co-enrolled. Ideal for students who have taken AP or honors courses in high school, this course challenges students to practice the advanced literacy skills necessary for a liberal arts education by reading and responding to academic texts. By exploring the style, vocabulary, and structure of various academic texts, they develop the flexibility to move among academic discourse communities. Students are introduced to academic research. Students who earn a C- or above will thereby fulfill their first-year college writing requirement; all others must enroll in WRTG 115 in the Spring.