The English major at Drew is developing a new track in Writing and Communication Studies. We are also developing a new New York Semester in Communications and Media, hopefully beginning in Spring 2015 — Please check back next semester for more details.

Meanwhile, consider the courses below for Fall 2014.
NOTE: ENGL 111 will be the gateway course to the Writing and Communication Track and one of two possible pre-requisites for the New York Semester (ENGL 110 is the other);  ENGL 214 will prepare you for paid employment in the Writing Center and possibly for selection as a Van Houten Memorial Fund Writing Fellow in the future; and the other courses will give you a strong background in the art and craft of writing and communication. Please address questions to Professor Sandra Jamieson.

Fall 2014 WRITING & COMMUNICATION STUDIES COURSES:

ENGL 111- Introduction to Writing and Communication Studies
Instructor: Sandra Jamieson
Mon & Wed 3:00-4:30

This course introduces students to the related fields of Writing Studies and Communication Studies. At the heart of each is the study of language and the complex ways we shape and are shaped by the written and spoken word. From the personal to the professional, written and spoken texts are driven by the message the author/speaker wishes to send, the needs and expectations of the audience being addressed, and the genre and medium selected for that message.  From roots in classical rhetoric and the creative arts to current uses in civic and professional realms, written and spoken communication moves, inspires, persuades, entertains, connects, and sometimes alienates us. This course will study the history, theory, and practical applications of writing and communication from social media to civic engagement, and from creative nonfiction to professions as diverse as advertising, journalism, public relations, and the law. We will also consider the politics of literacy, the impact of global Englishes, stylistic debates, and the ways technologies have changed writing and communication.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]
[CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary]

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ENGL 214 - Theory and Practice of Writing Center Tutoring
Instructor: Maya Sanyal
Tues & Thurs 1:40-2:45

This course introduces students to composition and tutoring theory and pedagogy. A writing intensive course, “Theory and Practice” combines readings in composition studies with a practicum that allows student to directly engage and interrogate the ideas and pedagogies they encounter. A significant portion of the course involves working directly with writers from a variety of disciplines. After successfully completing the class, students will be invited to apply for “writing fellow” and “writing tutor” positions in the Writing Center.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

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ENGL 221 - History of Rhetoric
Instructor: Melissa Nicolas
Tues & Thurs 10:50-12:05

Rhetoric, most typically defined as “the art of persuasion,” has had a variety of descriptions based on the describer and his or her historical context. This class will study the changing definitions of rhetoric from 5th-century B.C. Greece to contemporary American culture and why those changes took place. Students will also be asked to analyze rhetoric’s relation to politics, religion, law and cultural identity from antiquity to the present day.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

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ENGL 215 - Writing For and About Business
Instructor: Jill E Hamburg-Coplan
Thurs 1:45-4:15

Concentrates on the development of a clear, precise writing style and practice in dealing with specific types of business writing problems. Students complete writing projects, individually and in teams, in the context of hypothetical business situations, such as preparing and presenting a report, preparing and presenting a project proposal, applying for a job, and reviewing a report or project proposal. Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

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ENGL 216 - Intro to Journalism
Instructor: Bruce Reynolds
Mon 7:15-9:45

An introduction to the fundamentals and procedures of operating a newspaper. Emphasizes gathering news and writing clear, vigorous copy. Studies layout, editing, feature and editorial writing, and copy-editing as well as the ethics and responsibilities of journalism.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

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ENGL 311 – Nonfiction Writing
Instructor:  Jocelyn Lieu
Mon 1:45-4:15

Workshops with weekly round-table editing sessions, offering writing and reading assignments in established and innovative nonfiction forms. Emphasizes expressive writing-the personal and informal essay, autobiography and biography, the character sketch, vignette, narrative, and prose lyric. At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Signature of instructor required for registration. At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

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LING 101 – Language, Communication, and Culture
Instructor:  Elizabeth Kimball
Mon & Wed 1:40 – 2:55

An introduction to the role of language and its various forms of transmission in the construction of individual and cultural identity. Topics include language and gender, language and ethnicity, language and social structures.
[CLA-Breadth/Social Science]
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LING 302 - Sociolinguistic Theory and Method
Instructor:  tba
Mon & Wed 10:50 – 12:05

This course explores how language shapes the ways people communicate and how language forms social identities and influences group membership. It examines the cultural beliefs and ideologies embedded in language and how they inform the organization of society. The course will explore topics such as language and power, linguistic ideologies, language socialization, language and identity, linguistic variation, and linguistic ethnography. This course puts linguist theory into practice through the exploration and application of theory from the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Students will learn the theory and method of linguistic research and collect original data for analysis.
[CLA-Breadth/Social Science] [CLA-Diversity/US]
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SPCH 101 – Speech Fundamentals
Instructor:  LucyAnn Saltzman
(001) Tues & Thurs, 9:25 am – 10:40

(002) Tues & Thurs, 10:50 am – 12:05

Provides students with a variety of extemporaneous and impromptu speaking experiences, which develop the student’s skills in the organization, content, and delivery of public communication. Includes some vocal exercise work to help train the speaker to better understand, use, and control the voice and body in performance. Overall aim is to help students feel more confident in their ability to “think on their feet” and present ideas in a clear and interesting manner.
[CLA-Breadth/Arts]

 

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OTHER WRITING & COMMUNICATION COURSES REGULARLY OFFERED

ENGL 219 (002)  Blogs, Tweets, and Social Media:  Writing with Style in the New Millennium
Instructor: Sandra Jamieson
This course explores the relationship between audience, purpose and text in a cross section of electronic formats, including tweets, blogs, status updates, text messages, and various social media. We will develop criteria for evaluating each form of writing, find examples, assess what makes them effective (including questions of ethics and responsibility), consider the decoding skills they demand from readers, and practice the form ourselves. Students in this course will build a personal webpage (using WordPress), create and maintain a blog, and explore other forms of electronic and social media appropriate for college and beyond. Assignments will range from extended papers to 140 character pseudo-tweets.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

ENGL 110 – Introduction to Media Studies
Instructor: Edmond Chang
This course offers an overview of the history, technological changes, and cultural and intellectual significance of media forms in modern culture. Media covered include print, electronic media (radio, television, film) and digital (“new”) media (internet, social media, mobile media). Topics include the nature and function of media, media and its relationship to information and communication, and social and intellectual aspects of media.
Offered Annually.
[CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary] [CLA-Writing Intensive]

ENGL 311 – Travel Writing
Instructor: Sandra Jamieson
This writing workshops will teach you to capture your experiences and bring them alive for others.  A popular form of creative nonfiction, travel writing falls between memoir and article because it is as much about the author as it is about the location of the journey.  We are always traveling somewhere, and those journeys all provide excellent material for travel writing, but writing about that travel also deepens the experience of the journey, allowing us to reflect on it and make connections that we could not make whilst still in motion. Some essays may strive to make the unfamiliar and the strange accessible to readers, but others may render the seemingly familiar strange and new, allowing writer and readers to see things differently. 
At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

ENGL 312 – Nonfiction Writing: Feature and Magazine Articles
Instructor: Sandra Jamieson
This writing workshops includes round-table and small group review and editing sessions, writing exercises, and discussions of various kinds of feature and magazine article. Students will write established and innovative nonfiction, with assignments emphasizing the factual article as a literary form and providing practice in assembling facts and in shaping the informative, lively article, editorial, and critical review. Participants will also practice pitching and developing stories, and offering advice for revision and line-editing.
At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

ENGL 312 – Nonfiction Writing: Book and Film Reviewing
Instructor: Hirsh Sawhney
This Workshops with weekly round-table editing sessions, offering writing and reading assignments in established and innovative nonfiction forms. Emphasizes the factual article as a literary form with an emphasis on the review article. Provides practice in assembling facts (research and interviewing procedures) and in shaping the informative, lively critical review.
At the discretion of the department, may be taken twice for credit. Enrollment priority: writing minors.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

SOC 309 – Sociology of Mass Communications
Instructor:  Jonathan Reader
An overview of how the mass media and American cultural, political and economic institutions mutually affect each other. Systems of mass communication examined include books, the Internet, magazines, movies, newspapers, and television. Two topics to be emphasized are: 1) the production, control, and consumption of various forms of information in the mass media; 2) comparative analyses of the uses of mass media in different countries. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor.
Offered Fall semester

ENGL 204 – Environmental Writing and Ecocriticism
[CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary] [CLA-Writing Intensive]

ENGL 219 – Community Language and Literacy
[CLA-Off Campus]

ENGL 219 – Advanced Composition: Variable Theme.
This course provides writing and rhetorical instruction on a variety of topics and may include theoretical readings that discuss argumentation, advanced elements of style, and cultural studies critique of compositions in popular culture. The course also contains significant workshop activity, and students will be expected to produce several major compositions throughout the semester, alongside smaller critical works. These larger assignments may include multimedia compositions, or may incorporate community engagement involving literacy, according to the variable theme of that semester.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Writing or equiv.
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

PHIL 352 – Philosophy of Language.
A seminar on problems of meaning, truth, and reference. Discussions focus on some of the following topics: the nature of names and descriptions, identity statements and their analysis, necessary truths, the semantic theory of truth, the thesis of the interdeterminacy of translation, and the problem of propositional attitudes. Readings include selections from Frege, Russell, Strawson, Quine, Tarski, Austin, Searle, Wittgenstein, and Kripke.  Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years. [CLA-Breadth/Humanities] [CLA-Writing Intensive]

RELATED COURSES – RECOMMENDED DEPENDING ON AREA OF INTEREST:

ARTH 258 – Word and Image: The Art of the Book.
This class examines the history of illustrated books from late antiquity through the early modern period, from early Christian Rome to Mughal India. Manuscripts and early printed books will be considered in terms of their original function and owners as well as how they have been used, collected, and appreciated up to the present day. The main concerns of the course will be the way in which the images in the manuscripts convey meaning in ways complementary to and beyond the text, reflect the interests of their patrons and the stylistic and economic concerns of their artists, and act as evidence of the devotional, social, and political contexts in which the books were produced.
[CLA-Breadth/Humanities] [CLA-Breadth/Arts] [CLA-Diversity/International]

ARTH 242 / PHIL 334 – Aesthetics.
A study of a variety of questions centered upon philosophical aspects of art. Of primary concern are the notions of beauty, formalism, emotivism, criticism, expression, creation, and evaluation. Focuses on specific works of art as they serve to illuminate philosophical concerns.

ENGL 325 – Digital Humanities
[CLA - Breadth/Interdisciplinary] 
[CLA-Writing Intensive]

THEA 153 / MUS 353 – Writing for the Musical Theatre.
An exploration of the history, style, and techniques of writing for the musical theatre through the collaboration of composer, playwright, and lyricist. Course work will include development of original material. Enrollment priority: Given to Theatre Arts and Music majors. Prerequisite: THEA 255 or MUS 260, or permission of instructor.