Associate Professor of Comparative Theology

About

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

M.Div., United Theological College (Montreal, Canada)

B.A., B.Th., M.A., McGill University

B.A., Yonsei University (Seoul, Korea)

Professor Hyo-Dong Lee joined the faculty of the Drew University Theological School and its Graduate Department of Religion in 2007. Previous to his move to Drew, he taught at the Department of Religious Studies, Hobart and William Smith Colleges.  Hyo-Dong Lee is a native of South Korea and holds a B.A. from Yonsei University in Seoul.  His postgraduate work consists in an M.A. from McGill University, an M.Div. from the United Theological College (the United Church of Canada), and a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.  Professor Lee’s research and teaching interests lie in comparative theology and comparative philosophy of religion, with a focus on the dialogue between the Christian/Western theological and philosophical tradition and Northeast Asian philosophical and religious thought, including Confucianism, Daoism, Donghak, etc.  His interests extend also to postcolonial theories and European postmodern thought.

 

Publications

Spirit, Qi, and the Multitude: A Comparative Theology for the Democracy of  Creation (Fordham University Press, 2013)

“The Heart-Mind of the Way and the Human Heart-Mind are Non-Dual: A Reflection on the Neo-Confucian ‘Panentheism’ of Zhu Xi and Nongmun.” In Panentheism in the World Religions. Eds. Loriliai Biernacki and Philip Clayton (Oxford University Press, 2013).

“Consecrate the Offerings to Yourselves.” TheoSpirit 9, no. 2 (Fall 2011).

“Theological Themes: John 1:(1-9), 10-18.” Lectionary Homiletics 22, no. 1 (Dec-Jan 2011).

“‘Empty and Tranquil, and Without Any Sign, and Yet All Things Are Already Luxuriantly Present’: A Comparative-Theological Reflection on the Manifold Spirit.” In Polydoxy: Theology of Multiplicity and Relation. Eds. Catherine Keller and Laurel C. Schneider. London and New York: Routledge, 2010.

“Interreligious Dialogue as a Politics of Recognition: A Postcolonial Re-reading of Hegel for Interreligious Solidarity.” The Journal of Religion 85, no. 4 (2005).

Academic Presentations:

“The Great Ultimate and the Chaosmos: Nongmun’s Non-dual Conception of the li-qi Relation in Conversation with Deleuze’s Notion of Virtuality.”  Presented at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November 2012.

“Being Hospitable to the Subaltern Others of Religious Others: Comparative Theology as a Decolonizing Theological Practice in Asia.” Presented at the 7th Meeting of the Congress of Asian Theologians (CATS VII), Seoul, Korea, July 2012.

“The Heart-Mind of the Way and the Human Heart-Mind are Non-Dual: A Reflection on the Neo-Confucian ‘Panentheism’ of Zhu Xi and Im Seong-ju.” Presented at the Integral Cosmology and Panentheism conference at the Esalen Center for Theory and Research, Esalen, CA, November 2010.

“Empty and Tranquil, and Without Any Sign, and Yet All Things Are Already Luxuriantly Present”: A Comparative-Theological Reflection on the Manifold Spirit of the Taegeuk/Taiji.” Presented at the Transdisciplinary Theological Colloquium, Drew University, Madison, NJ, October 2009.

“My Methodological Moves and Theoretical Partners in Constructive Theology.”  Presented at the Workgroup in Constructive Theology Annual Meeting, April 2009.

“Interreligious Dialogue as a Politics of Recognition: A Postcolonial Re-reading of Hegel for Interreligious Solidarity.”  Presented at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November 2004.

“A Hegelian Aufhebung of Levinas for Non-Human Others.”  Presented as the International Association for Environmental Philosophy, Penn State University, University Park, PA, October, 2000.

“A Liberating Ecology of the Other: A Critical Retrieval of Emmanuel Levinas for Twenty-First Century Theology.”  Presented at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November, 1999.

Courses

Confucian and Taoist Religious Thought

Theology of Religious Pluralism: One God, Many Paths?

Hegel: Reason, Revolution, and the Beginning of Liberation Theology

Topics in Comparative Theology: Spirit, Ch’i, and Trinity

Asian Theologies of Liberation and Indigenization

Theology of Spirit: A Panentheistic Exploration of the World

Challenge of World Religions to Christian Faith and Practice

Interreligious Theologies

Contact

E-mail: hlee5@drew.edu

Office: Seminary Hall 05A

Phone: 973-408-3129

Fax: 973-408-3534