Classes and information sessions for Summer college students are taught by regular full-time Drew faculty and professional staff. The course material presented to students is usually drawn from first-year college courses, so that the students have a genuine experience of college-level work. The courses emphasize experiential learning, classroom discussion, and intellectual engagement, some of the hallmarks of a liberal arts education at Drew.

Wendy Kolmar

Title:  Director of the Summer College, Chair and Professor of English
Email:  wkolmar@drew.edu
Biography:  
Wendy Kolmar is Chair of the English department, professor of English, and Director of Women’s Studies. She teaches courses on Victorian literature, feminist theory, gender and literature, Gothic and supernatural literature, film and literary criticism. Her publications include Haunting the House of Fiction: Feminist Perspectives on Ghost Stories by American

Women (with Lynette Carpenter, 1991); Feminist Theory: A Reader (with Fran Batkowski, now in its third edition) and an issue of Women’s Studies Quarterly entitled Looking Across the Lens: Women’s Studies and Film.  She has also consulted with schools, colleges, and universities around the country on developing their women’s studies programs, on creating good educational climates for girls, and on transforming the curriculum to include diverse perspectives.

Maya Sanyal

Title:  Program Coordinator for the Summer College, Assistant Director of the Writing Center and Academic Services, Adjunct Lecturer of English
Email:  
msanyal@drew.edu
Biography:
  Maya Sanyal is has a Ph.D. from Drew University in English, with a concentration in Women’s Studies.  Her areas of interest include early twentieth-century colonial writing, Victorian literature, feminist theory, student academic services and advising, ESL studies, and Disability Studies. During the academic year, she works as the Assistant Director of the Drew Writing Center, and also teaches college and graduate level writing to students in the College of Liberal Arts and the Theological School. In the summer, she coordinates the Summer College program.

Chris Ceraso

Title: Associate Professor of Theatre Arts
Email: 
cceraso@drew.edu
Biography: Chris Ceraso is an actor, playwright, screenwriter and teacher.  Recent roles include Julius Caesar in Shaw’s Caesar and Cleopatra, Solness in Ibsen’s The Master Builder, Gaev in Chekov’s The Cherry Orchard (Resonance Ensemble at the Clurman Theatre), King Lear with New York’s 52nd Street Project, and Prospero in The Tempest at Drew University.  At the Ensemble Studio Theatre and elsewhere, he has premiered new plays by prominent contemporary writers such as David Mamet, Joyce Carol Oates, Romulus Linney, Lanford Wilson and Christopher Durang, among many others.  TV and Film: “Law and Order”, “L&O S.V.U,” “Deadline,” “City Kids,” “Magnetism,” “101 Ways,” among others.  As a playwright he has had numerous plays produced, developed and/or commissioned by prominent New York and regional theaters.  His play Home Fires Burning was made into a feature film, The Turning, for which he co-wrote the screenplay.  He has also written for TV and radio.  Chris is the principal teacher of Acting at Drew.

Graham Cousens

Title: Assistant Professor of Psychology
Email:  
gcousens@drew.edu
Biography:  Graham Cousens is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Drew and is a member of the Neurosciences Program. His research focuses on the neural substrates of learning and memory. He earned a Ph.D. from Rutgers University in 2002, and his dissertation dealt with contributions of two brain regions involved in emotion (the amygdaloid complex and orbital frontal cortex) to olfactory learning. Prior to arriving at Drew in 2007, Dr. Cousens was a post-doctoral fellow in neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine and at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Cousens teaches several courses in both the psychology and neuroscience programs, including Introduction to Psychology, Research Methods, Learning and Memory, and Cognitive Neuroscience.

Kim Crabbe

Title: Director, Center for Career Development
Email:  
kcrabbe@drew.edu
Biography:
 Kim Crabbe is the Director of the Center for Career Development at Drew University.  She has a Master of Science in School Counseling from St. John’s University and has worked in career services for 19 years.  She is co-author of the book, Job Hunting Made Easy.  Currently, she is working on an alumni mentor program for sophomore students titled, “AMPS.”

Elise DuBord

Title:  Assistant Professor of Spanish
Email:  edubord@drew.edu
Biography:  Elise DuBord is an assistant professor of Spanish. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and her B.A. from Minnesota State University, Moorhead. Before attending graduate school, Elise was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala where she worked on projects in organic agriculture, community development and adult literacy. Her current research focuses on language use in job negotiations among immigrant day laborers and their employers.

Lillie Edwards

Title:  Professor of History and African-American/African Studies
Email:
 ledwards@drew.edu
Biography:  Lillie Edwards received her B.A. from Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH in English and with honors in history.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago with fields in African history, U.S. Southern history, and African literature.  Before coming to Drew, she taught at Earlham College (IN), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and DePaul University (Chicago).  At Drew, she is a member of the history department, the founding director of Pan-African studies and the director of American studies.  She teaches courses in U.S. history, African-American history, and Pan-African studies.  Prof. Edwards has published entries in dictionaries and encyclopedia such as The Dictionary of Christianity in America (1990), Encyclopedia of African-American Civil Rights (1992), Black Women in American (1993), African-American Culture and History (1996), and African Folklore: An Encyclopedia (2003).  Her publications also include history, social studies and literature texts for secondary school students, such as Denmark Vesey: Slave Revolt Leader (1990), chapters for a middle school world history textbook, The World and Its People (1996) and a recent co-authored comparative literature anthology and teaching guide for Things Fall Apart (2007).

Micah Fink

Title: Producer, Documentaries and Short Films
Biography:  Micah Fink is an Emmy-nominated producer specializing in international affairs, public health, national security, and environmental issues.  He has produced documentary films and special series for PBS WIDE ANGLE, PBS FRONTLINE, Thirteen/WNET, National Geographic Television and ABC News.  From 2002-2005, Micah was on the editorial staff of the PBS International News and Public Affairs series WIDE ANGLE.  He is experienced in working in foreign locations and has filmed extensively in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Caribbean.  He is currently working on a series of short films about cultural issues related to the AIDS epidemic in Jamaica and is in production on a documentary feature for HBO about a Native American community living on a Superfund toxic waste site in Northern New Jersey.

Martin Foys

Title:  Associate Professor of English
Email:  mfoys@drew.edu
Biography:
 Martin Foys is an Associate Professor of English at Drew University.  He earned his Ph.D. from Loyola University Chicago and his B.A. from right here at Drew. Trained as a specialist in medieval and Old English literature and language (for example, Beowulf), Martin also studies and teaches media history and theory, with a special interest in how digital technology is changing the way we understand both the past and the present.

Rodney Gilbert

Title:  Adjunct Lecturer of Theatre Arts
Email:  rgilbert@drew.edu
Biography:  
Rodney Gilbert is an adjunct professor at Drew University for the Theatre Department where he teaches extemporaneous, honors speech, and introduction to acting and directing.  He is also a lead teaching artist for arts organization including Arts Horizons, Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark Museum, and the Kennedy Center’s Wolf Trap Early Learning Program. He creates and presents international and national workshops including work in Johannesburg, South Africa where he presented a workshop with Alysia Souder “Rites of Passage for At- Risk Youth” at The Common Grounds Learning Conference at Wits University.  Mr. Gilbert is the founder and president of Yendor Productions, which is dedicated to bringing arts to the people by producing and developing artistic events and educational programming for underserved population.  Yendor Productions produced and directed “Dreamers Dreaming the Dream,” a documentary on The I Have a Dream Foundation (IHAD) and its program in Plainfield, NJ which tracks students from middle school through high school and pays for their college education.  He designed the arts education program for the city of Newark’s after- school program, “Zoom – We’re Going Places.” He is the resident director for Winceyco Entertainment, which produces musically educational programs throughout the tri- state area and the senior program advisor for City Without Walls – the oldest contemporary art space in NJ.  He just closed Passage Theatre’s season appearing in “Trenton Lights.”

Ryan Hinrichs

Title:  Associate Professor of Chemistry
Email:  
rhinrich@drew.edu
Biography:  Ryan Hinrichs, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, earned his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Cornell University. He taught for five years at Sarah Lawrence College before joining the Chemistry Department at Drew in 2007. His research explores the chemistry between air pollutants and particulate matter suspended in Earth’s atmosphere. Characterizing this chemistry is important for understanding how these particulates impact global climate change by altering cloud formation processes. Recent work in Professor Hinrichs’ research lab has been published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry, co-authored with three Drew undergraduate students. When not teaching or researching, Professor Hinrichs enjoys the fresh air of the outdoors with his family.

Caitlin Killian

Title:  Associate Professor of Sociology
Email:  
ckillian@drew.edu
Biography:
 Caitlin Killian joined the Sociology faculty at Drew in 2001. She received her Ph.D. in sociology with a certificate in women’s studies from Emory University, and her B.A. in comparative literature with a concentration in women’s studies from Swarthmore College. She teaches courses on gender, families, reproduction, and immigration. Her areas of interest include gender and ethnic socialization, identity processes, immigration and cultural adaptation, Muslims in Western societies, and reproductive technologies, infertility, and childbearing. Her publications include articles on immigrants’ identity negotiation ( Social Psychology Quarterly ), Muslim women’s views on the headscarf affair in France ( Gender & Society ), Vietnamese parents and children in the United States ( Sociological Spectrum ), and the role of bicultural competence in reducing crime among the children of immigrants (chapter in Migration, Culture Conflict and Crime ). She has also participated in several conferences on Islam in Europe. She is the author of North African Women in France: Gender, Culture, and Identity (Stanford 2006).

Peggy Kuntz

Title:  Chair and Associate Professor of Art History
Email:
 mkuntz@drew.edu
Biography:  Margaret Kuntz received her Ph.D. from New York University, Institute of Fine Arts.  Her areas of specialty are Italian Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture.  Her areas of research are Rome, the Vatican Palace, and St. Peter’s basilica.  Currently she is working on papal banquets as diplomatic signifiers and Baroque Rome as a stage for parades and ephemeral display.

Jessica Lakin

Title:  Chair and Associate Professor of Psychology
Email:  jlakin@drew.edu
Biography:  Dr. Jessica Lakin received her BA in Psychology from Butler University in 1998 and her PhD in Social Psychology from Ohio State University in 2003, when she joined Drew as an Assistant Professor of Psychology.  Now an Associate Professor, she regularly teaches Introduction to Psychology, Social Psychology, Research Methods, and a seminar on Stereotyping and Prejudice. Most of her research focuses on nonverbal behavior, but she’s also interested in unconscious processes and self-regulation.

Maria Masucci

Title:  Chair and Professor of Anthropology
Email:  mmasucci@drew.edu
Biography:  Maria Masucci received her PhD in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University specializing in Latin American Archaeology. Her degree work was followed by post-doctoral training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in materials science and techniques for the reconstruction of ancient ceramic technology. Prof. Masucci conducts fieldwork primarily on the societies of coastal Ecuador but also on the early farming societies of Portugal. This research has been published in articles in Latin American Antiquity and Andean Past as well as a monograph from the University of Pittsburgh Press detailing the reconstruction of ancient resource use among coastal Ecuadorian societies. Her current research interests intersect with the development of a new course at Drew on Archaeology and Sustainability. This research looks at the ways societies utilize and manipulate their environment and the influences which affect choices. The goal of the course and research is to investigate how Archaeology and knowledge of past societies can inform discussions and choices made by societies today. At Drew Prof. Masucci directs the Archaeology Minor and contributes offerings in Archaeology for the Anthropology program including Archaeological laboratory and field methods, Ancient Societies and Latin American Archaeology.

David Miyamoto

Title:  Professor of Biology & Director of the New Jersey Governor’s School
Email:  
dmiyamot@drew.edu
Biography:
 Dr. Miyamoto grew up in California and graduated from University of California, San Diego with a B.A. in Biology.  He received his Ph.D. from Duke University and was a postdoctoral fellow and instructor at the University of Texas at Austin.  During this period he studied the mechanisms by which cells form structures in insect, chick and ascidian embryos using scanning, light and video time-lapse microscopy.  More recently he has been studying the role of nitric oxide and program cell death in initiating the response of ciliated tracheal cells to infection by Bordetella avium, a bacterium that causes a whooping cough-like disease in poultry.  Dr. Miyamoto is a Professor of Biology at Drew University where he has been a member of the faculty since 1986.

Robert Murawski

Title:  Assistant Professor of Physics
Email:  rmurawsk@drew.edu
Biography:  Dr. Robert Murawski was born in the Bronx, New York. He attended Fordham University in the Bronx where he received his BS degree in Physics. He then attended City College of the City University of New York in NYC for a master’s degree in mathematics. Upon completion of his masters, he later attended Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey for a Ph.D. in physics. After his Ph.D., he spent three years in Texas A&M in College Station, TX as a research associate. Dr. Murawski currently teaches at Drew University in the physics and astronomy department. Courses he has taught include Astronomy, Introductory Physics, and Electro Dynamics. His research interests include mathematical physics, laser physics, molecular spectroscopy, and variable stars. He is co-author on 18 publications including an article in the journal Science on using laser spectroscopy to detect anthrax spores in the atmosphere.

Patrick Philips

Title:  Assistant Professor of English
Email:  pphillip@drew.edu
Biography:
 Patrick Phillips is an Assistant Professor in the English department, and director of the Creative Writing Minor.  He received his Ph.D. from New York University, and his B.A. from Tufts.  His first book of poems, Chattahoochee, won the 2005 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and his second, Boy, was published in 2008.  He is currently a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and has also received support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the U.S. Fulbright Commission.  He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Kimberly Rhodes

Title:  Associate Professor of Art History
Email:  krhodes@drew.edu
Biography:  Kimberly Rhodes writes and teaches about modern and contemporary visual culture and has worked as an art historian in both museum and academic settings. Her courses at Drew include the New York Semester on Contemporary Art, 19th-century Art, Early 20th-Century Art, and American Art. Most recently, she is the author of Ophelia and Victorian Visual Culture: Representing Body Politics in the Nineteenth Century (Ashgate, 2008), which exemplifies her multidisciplinary approach to the study of art history. Her current research projects continue the exploration of relationships among Shakespeare’s plays and nineteenth-century visual culture and investigate contemporary artists’ responses to art history.

Catherine Riihimaki

Title:  Assistant Professor of Biology
Email:  
criihimaki@drew.edu
Biography:
 Catherine Rihiimaki has an undergraduate degree from Williams College in Mathematics and Geosciences and a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from Univ. of California, Santa Cruz.  She has been a postdoctoral Fellow in Bryn Mawr College.  Her research interests focus on trying to understand the relative importance of climate in driving landscapes to evolve. She does a mixture of fieldwork and computer modeling to explore how river and glacier systems change through time. Specific projects include exploring the role of climate change in the evolution of the Rocky Mountain landscape during the last 5 million years, the modern connection between climate and glacier dynamics in Alaska and Glacier National Park, and the causes of and solutions to recent sediment contamination of Lake Tahoe.

Christopher Taylor

Title:  Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the Center on Religion, Culture & Conflict
Email:
 ctaylor@drew.edu
Biography:  Dr. Chris Taylor is a professor of Islamic history and religion and the chair of the Religious Studies Department at Drew.  He is also the former director of the Middle East Studies Program at Drew.  Dr. Taylor has lived and traveled extensively in the Middle East and he has directed 12 study abroad programs for Drew students in the Middle East.  Dr. Taylor is also an avid scuba diver and in his spare time he teaches scuba diving at Drew too.

Tammy Windfelder

Title:  Chair and Associate Professor of Biology
Email:
 twindfel@drew.edu
Biography:  Tammy Windfelder is an Associate Professor of Biology, and Chair of the department.  She received her Ph.D. from Duke University and her B.S. from Bucknell University.  Tammy has studied primate behavior in Peru and Uganda, and has recently started research on small mammal population dynamics here in New Jersey.