ARLT - Formerly ARLET

ARLT 107 - Formerly ARLET 107 - The Medieval Mind (3)
This course is intended as a sequel to "Dante and his World";therefore only students who have taken that course or who are very familiar with "The Divine Comedy" should enroll. In addition to an in-depth reading of select cantos of the entire "Commedia", students will read Dante's "minor works," including La Vita Nuova, Il Convivio, de Vulgari Eloquentia, and de Monarchai.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 108 - Formerly ARLET 108 - Studies in European History (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
ARLT 114 - Formerly ARLET 114 - The Classics (3)
Topics include: Classical Roots, Modern Revisions: Eclectic Electra; Gods, Great Men, and Little Women; Re-Making Myth: Joyce's Journey. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 115 - Formerly ARLET 115 - The English Bible (3)
Topics include: the Old Testament; the New Testament and Apocrypha.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 118 - Formerly ARLET 118 - Medieval History (3)
Topics include: Magic, Madness, and Mayhem in the Middle
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 122 - Formerly ARLET 122 - Topics in Modern Philosophy (3)
Topics include: Education, Equality, and Our Ideals of Justice; Progress Pro and Con: Modernity as a Problem.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 130 - Formerly ARLET 130 - Studies in Ancient History and Society (3)
Topics vary and are announced prior to registration. Course may be repeated
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 201 - Formerly ARLET 201 - Enduring Social and Political Problems (3)
Topics include: the Search for the Good Community; Creative Breakthroughs in Politics; Protection Against Genocide.
ARLT 204 - Formerly ARLET 204 - Studies in Shakespeare (3)
Topics include: Shakespeare's Use of Language; Plays of Intrigue; Clowns, Confusions, Crimes, and Couples: Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 205 - Formerly ARLET 205 - The Age of Reason (3)
No description is available for this course.
ARLT 206 - Formerly ARLET 206 - American History (3)
Topics include: Literature of the American Civil War; War Comes Again: The Civil War and WWII; The Great War: Its Impact on Culture and Politics; Political Philosophy and Political Health; Religion and the Prohibition Movement.
Course may be repeated. Same as: PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+725
ARLT 207 - Formerly ARLET 207 - Topics in African American History: (3)
Topics vary and are announced at registration.
Same as: PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+745
ARLT 208 - Formerly ARLET 208 - Topics in American Intellectual History: (3)
Topics in American Intellectual history vary with instructor interest and expertise.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 210 - Formerly ARLET 210 - Studies in American Political Thought (3)
Studies in the thought and the text of modern thinkers. Topics vary and are published prior to registration.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 211 - Formerly ARLET 211 - Historical Studies (3)
Topics include History Imagined: Literature Opens the Annals. Course may be repeated as topic changes.
ARLT 214 - Formerly ARLET 214 - American Culture (3)
Topics include: Frederick Olmsted, Central Park, and the Idea of Urban Landscapes in 19th-Century America; Contributions of William and Henry James; No Ordinary Time: America on the Homefront During WWII; Legacies of the Family: Domestic Revolutions in America from Colonial Times to the Present; Ireland and America.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 215 - Formerly ARLET 215 - Studies in British History (3)
Topics include: Charles Dickens in His Time; John Locke and 18th-Century Literature; The Age of Trollope; Perspectives on Gender, Class, and Race in Victorian England.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 218 - Formerly ARLET 218 - European Intellectual History (3)
Topics include: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe; Balzac's Human Comedy; St. Petersburg: the Biography of a City; Selected 19th-Century Writers.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 220 - Formerly ARLET 220 - Studies in European Literature (3)
Topics include: Humanism and Renaissance in Italy
ARLT 225 - Formerly ARLET 225 - History of Rhetoric (3)
Rhetoric, most typically defined as "the art of persuasion," has had a variety of descriptions based on the describer and his or her historical context. This class will study the changing definitions of rhetoric from 5th-century B.C. Greece to contemporary American culture and why those changes took place. Students will also be asked to analyze rhetoric's relation to politics, religion, law and cultural identity from antiquity to the present day.
ARLT 230 - Formerly ARLET 230 - Vatican Councils I & II (3)
This course seeks to understand the Council's decrees in context: first, in relation to its predecessor to which it was integrally related, historically and otherwise; second, by considering the philosophical, theological, cultural, historical, political and social influences which brought about the convocation of both councils and the final documents. Students are guided through original texts and assisted in evaluating how the teachings of these councils have been "received" within the Catholic Church, and how they have in turn had an impact on ecumenical, interreligious and political affairs.
ARLT 231 - Formerly ARLET 231 - The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey (3)
In this course, students first read, then see, the plays being presented by The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey in their theatre on the Drew University campus.
ARLT 232 - Formerly ARLET 232 - Topics in Archival Research (3)
Topics include: The Irish Immigrant Experience.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 233 - Formerly ARLET 233 - Archives: History and Methods (3)
A study of the theory and practice of religious archives, arranging, describing, evaluating, and using primary source documents in the collections of the United Methodist Archives and History Center. Focuses on preservation, micrographics, scholarly editing, and oral history. Guest lecturers. Each student develops a project based on a collection in the Archives.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: CHST - Formerly CHIST+735
ARLT 234A - Formerly ARLET 234 - Studies in Irish History and Literature (3)
This course will trace the way in which the history and culture of Ireland have been represented in visual images from 1800 to the present day. The main representations will be films, photographs, cartoons and wall murals.The course will examine how these images have been used to reinforce nationalist and unionist, Catholic and Protestant caricatures, both within Ireland and elsewhere. it will also explore the emergence of cultural stereotyping, which has ranged from affectionate views of "paddy" (drunk, stupid, but loveable) to more sinister ones (dangerous, furtive, violent). Other visual stereotypes will also be examined, such as images of 'the west' (spiritual, mystical, unspoilt) compared with images of 'the north' (dark, unknown,threatening). Be prepared to challenge these and other stereotypes.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 240 - Formerly ARLET 240 - Studies in Church History (3)
Topics vary and are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 245 - Formerly ARLET 245 - Topics in Economics: (3)
Courses examine different aspects of the field of Economics.
ARLT 301 - Formerly ARLET 301 - Contemporary Studies in the Humanities (3)
Topics include: The Literary Response to HIV/AIDS; Modernist Literature; Humanity vs. Nature; Contemporary Poetry; Contemporary American Fiction; Living After Attack; The Importance of Being Witty. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated. Same as: PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+750
ARLT 304 - Formerly ARLET 304 - Studies in American Literature (3)
Topics include: The Yearning for Paradise; Images of the Garden in American Literature; American Gothic Fiction; Washington Irving and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; American Inheritors of Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 306 - Formerly ARLET 306 - Images of the Future (3)
Topics include: The Image of the City.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 310 - Formerly ARLET 310 - 20th-Century British Literature (3)
Topics include: Charles Williams; C.S. Lewis
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 313 - Formerly ARLET 313 - Psychopathology and Contemporary Life (3)
This courses focuses on mastering the "Sea of Storms" -- on the moon or in ourselves.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 314 - Formerly ARLET 314 - Contemporary Uses of Mythology (3)
Topics include: Journey Back to Self; Tools of the Titans: Psychodynamic Myths. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 318 - Formerly ARLET 318 - British Women Novelists (3)
Topics include: Jane Austen; The Bront Sisters: Charlotte, Emily, and Anne.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 319 - Formerly ARLET 319 - Topics in Literature: (3)
Selected Topics in Literature that vary by genre, figure, and focus from year to year.
ARLT 320 - Formerly ARLET 320 - Literature and Medicine (3)
No description is available for this course.
ARLT 321 - Formerly ARLET 321 - Studies in British Literature (3)
The modernist period in literature was one which concerned itself with the problem of knowledge. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the certainty of the Victorian sages gave way to a questioning of certain systems of faith (religion, science, nationalism, imperialism, etc.) that had not only been accepted as truth, but were also crucial to the construct of British modernity. Reading a handful of novelists who have become (to some extent) definitive of British modernism, this course seeks to identify specific preoccupations of the period and how those preoccupations impact narrative voice and structure. In doing so, students explore how modernist plots remap different fields of knowledge. Texts include works by Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, and James Joyce.
Course may be repeated. Same as: PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+753
ARLT 322 - Formerly ARLET 322 - Studies in World Literature (3)
Topics include: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 323 - Formerly ARLET 323 - Studies in World Culture (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
ARLT 324 - Formerly ARLET 324 - Art of the Film (3)
Topics include: Women in Film; A History of the United States since 1918.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 326 - Formerly ARLET 326 - Studies in Psychoanalysis (3)
See MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+500 for course description.
Course may be repeated. Same as: MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+500
ARLT 327 - Formerly ARLET 327 - Marriage and the Family (3)
Topics include: Family Structures and Medical Ethics; Marriage and Family Counseling.
ARLT 328 - Formerly ARLET 328 - Literature and Medicine (3)
Topics include: Medical Narrative; Literature of Aging; Contemporary Ethical Issues in American Literature; Literary Art and the Medical Mind.
ARLT 329 - Formerly ARLET 329 - 20th-Century America (3)
Topics include: Themes in 20th-century American Religious History; Democracy, Liberalism, and the Problem of Propaganda.
ARLT 330 - Formerly ARLET 330 - Topics in Holocaust Studies (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
ARLT 334 - Formerly ARLET 334 - Biomedical Ethics (3)
This course examines the major medical care issues facing the discipline, including ethical and religious concerns involving abortion, death and dying, and human experimentation.
ARLT 335 - Formerly ARLET 335 - Studies in Genocide (3)
Topics include: The Armenian Genocide and the Politics of Denial; Cultures of Violence: Genocide after 1945.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 336 - Formerly ARLET 336 - Literature of the Holocaust (3)
Topics include: In Search of Anne Frank; Art from the Ashes.
ARLT 337 - Formerly ARLET 337 - Perspectives on the Holocaust (3)
This course provides multiple perspectives on the Holocaust, the near extermination of European Jewry and the brutal persecution of an extended mosaic of victims. As a watershed event, the Holocaust has radically affected our fundamental conceptions of the nature of human nature, the dimensions of evil, the existence of God, the power of bearing literary witness, the moral and political outlook for the future. Readings span the disciplines of history, psychology, literature, theology, and political science, each providing its own distinctive illumination as presented by a faculty member within the discipline, who lectures and participates at appointed sessions in interdisciplinary discussions. Course requirements include papers, journal entries, and a field trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
Same as HOST - Formerly HOST - Formerly HOLST+33 Course may be repeated. Same as: HOST - Formerly HOST - Formerly HOLST+33
ARLT 340 - Formerly ARLET 340 - Studies in Theatre and Playwriting: (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
ARLT 341 - Formerly ARLET 341 - Cultural Geography (3)
This course examines the natural features of geographic regions in order to understand how geographic causation affects regional political systems, economic opportunities, and social institutions.
ARLT 344 - Formerly ARLET 344 - Medical Sociology (3)
This course examines the important themes, dominant theoretical perspectives, and main methodological approaches involved in the sociological analysis of health care problems and their treatment.
ARLT 346 - Formerly ARLET 346 - European Cultural History (3)
Topics include: Alexander Pushkin: Texts and Contexts; The Life and Work of Vladimir Nabokov.
Same as: PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+752
ARLT 347 - Formerly ARLET 347 - Mystical Poetry from around the World (3)
This course examines mystical literature in verse form as it arises in different religious traditions from around the world. We ask why mystical revelations are so frequently expressed in poetry, and why many poets lean towards a mystical approach in their verse. The texts span the centuries from the Song of Solomon to Rumi, from zen poets to Emily Dickinson, Hart Crane and Seamus Heaney. Students are encouraged to develop their own definitions of mystical poetry and their own explanations for its appearance throughout the ages.
ARLT 348 - Formerly ARLET 348 - Studies in Poets and Poetry (3)
Topics include: "The Fatal Gift of Beauty": English Romantic Poets in Italy.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 349A - Formerly ARLET 349 - Topics in Cultural History: (3)
Selected Topics in Cultural History that vary from year to year.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 406 - Formerly ARLET 406 - American History Painting (3)
This course examines 18th- through early 20th-century American history painting as it related to its social, political, and cultural contexts.
ARLT 408 - Formerly ARLET 408 - The New York Semester on Contemporary Art (3)
This course is an introduction to contemporary art and criticism through discussion with major artists, critics, curators, and other art professionals in New York City and on the Drew campus.
ARLT 409 - Formerly ARLET 409 - Studies in Musicology (3)
Topics include: Romantic Opera: Rossini to Wagner; Chamber Music.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 414 - Formerly ARLET 414 - Studies in Music History (3)
Topics include: Life and Work of Mozart; Life and Work of Brahms; The Music of Fin de Sicle Vienna; The Great Romantic Divide: Music from Mendelssohn to Mahler; J. S. Bach: His Life and Work.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 415 - Formerly ARLET 415 - Studies in Book History (3)
Topics include: Gutenberg to Franklin: History of the Printed Book.
ARLT 416 - Formerly ARLET 416 - Topics in Art and Architecture (3)
Topics include: Russian Medieval Art and architecture; Christian Renaissance art.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 417 - Formerly ARLET 417 - Studies in Drama and Theatre (3)
No description is available for this course.
ARLT 502 - Formerly ARLET 502 - The Politics of Gender in Medicine (3)
This course demonstrates how the dissimilar physiology and illnesses of men and women are, nevertheless, parallel.
ARLT 503 - Formerly ARLET 503 - The Cultural History of Medicine (3)
This course traces the story of medicine from pre-history to the present.
ARLT 506 - Formerly ARLET 506 - Topics in Science and Medicine (3)
Topics include: The History of Scientific Medicine
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 507 - Formerly ARLET 507 - Medical Biography (3)
Topics include: Giovanni Battista Morgagni.
ARLT 509 - Formerly ARLET 509 - Great Issues in Medicine (3)
Topics include: the future of biomedical science; illness of body, mind, and spirit; ethics and medical research.
ARLT 511 - Formerly ARLET 511 - Medicine in Politics (3)
This course considers the political implications of ancient and historical plagues, as well as the politics of alarming new global challenges, such as the immuno-deficient diseases, tuberculosis, Hanta virus, Ebola, and biological warfare.
ARLT 512 - Formerly ARLET 512 - Plagues in History (3)
This course examines the relation between the human population and the micro and macroparasites that interact with it.
ARLT 515 - Formerly ARLET 515 - Contemporary Medicine and Culture (3)
Topics include: Science, Medicine, and Faith.
Course may be repeated. Same as: MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+515 PSDC - Formerly POSDOC+803
ARLT 517 - Formerly ARLET 517 - Topics in the History of Science: (3)
Selected Topics in the History of Science that vary from year to year.
ARLT 520 - Formerly ARLET 520 - Listening to the Symbolic Language of the Body (3)
This course investigates the communication from the self to the self, often found in illnesses, ticks, hysterical conversions, muscle tightness and other ailments.
ARLT 522 - Formerly ARLET 522 - Women and Aging (3)
See MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+505 for course description.
Same as: MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+505
ARLT 524 - Formerly ARLET 524 - Topics in Developmental Studies (3)
Topics include: The Role of the Family in the Early Development of Object Permanence and Non-Existence
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 525 - Formerly ARLET 525 - Medicine and Ecology (3)
See MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+810 for course description.
Course may be repeated. Same as: MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+810
ARLT 526 - Formerly ARLET 526 - Topics in Sociology (3)
Topics are announced at the time of registration and vary from semester to semester.
ARLT 529 - Formerly ARLET 529 - Medicine and Culture (3)
See MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+529 for course description.
Course may be repeated. Same as: MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+529
ARLT 601 - Formerly ARLET 601 - Studies in Spirituality (3)
Topics include: British Spirituality in the Time of Chaucer; British and Irish Spirituality in the Age of St. Patrick; The Life and Work of Henri J. M. Nouwen; Christian Mysticism and Contemplative Spiritual Practice.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 701 - Formerly ARLET 701 - Teaching In The Two Year College (3)
Taught by an Arts and Letters faculty member and faculty from the County College of Morris, this course focuses on cultures, missions, and practices of teaching in community colleges, especially in New Jersey. The Drew/CCM teaching team will introduce participants to central issues of teaching and learning in the community college sector of higher education. The course will explore the unique characteristics of community college students as well as the mission and history of the colleges. In terms of issues which present themselves, the course will consider the role of general education requirements, assessment, distance education, and the changing nature of the collective bargaining environment. Finally, the course will focus on practical issues: career transitions, syllabus design, writing courses and pedagogy, and the development of ones own teaching ethic as a potential faculty member.
This course is required for students proposing to do the D.Litt concentration in two-year college teaching.
ARLT 801 - Formerly ARLET 801 - Graduate Liberal Studies: What They Are, What They Do (3)
This entry seminar introduces D.Litt. students to the work of multiple disciplines in the Arts and Letters Program. It produces initial familiarity with fields of humanistic inquiry from among the program's seven concentrations: Historical Studies; Literary Studies; Global Studies; Studies in Spirituality; Irish/Irish American Studies; Fine Arts and Media Studies; and Writing. The seminar features a team of professors from several fields of study and practice taught in the CSGS, each of whom leads the seminar for two weeks. Through broad discussion and specific readings and assignments, classes preview what the individual disciplines "do" in our time. Students participate in the weekly conversations and write six short papers. The goal is to ground and enable each student's broad choices for D.Litt. work, from taking courses to conceiving the doctoral dissertation.
ARLT 900 - Formerly ARLET 900 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
ARLT 905C - Formerly ARLET 905 - Writing Practicum (3)
Topics include: The Art of the Essay; Creative Writing; Writing to Heal; The Joy of Scholarly Writing; Fiction Writing; Memoir and Autobiography.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 910 - Formerly ARLET 910 - Painting and Drawing Practicum (3)
Topics include: The Watercolorist's Craft; The Art of Charcoal Drawing; The Portrait and the Pen. This course is repeatable.
Course may be repeated.
ARLT 911 - Formerly ARLET 911 - Travel Course (3)
Topics include: Lost City Found: Biblical Bethesda; Isle of the Saints: Ireland from the Celts to the Normans.
ARLT 950 - Formerly ARLET 950 - Travel Course: West Africa (3)
No description is available for this course.
ARLT 990 - Formerly ARLET 990 - M.Litt. Thesis (3)
No description is available for this course.
ARLT 999 - Formerly ARLET 999 - D.Litt. Dissertation (9)
No description is available for this course.

BBST - Formerly BIBST

BBST 665 - Formerly BIBST 165 - Topics in Hebrew Bible (3)
Studies in the theological themes and paradigms of the Old Testament and in issues involved in theological interpretation. Subjects vary.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 667 - Formerly BIBST 167 - Archaeological Perspectives on Religion in Ancient Israel (3)
Study of the religious practices in Palestine, as presented by architecture, artifacts, and texts. Emphasis is on the archaeological evidence primary to understanding the variety and actuality of religion and cult in ancient Israel.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 680 - Formerly BIBST 180 - Gender and Sexuality in the Bible (3)
Study of gender and sexuality in selected texts from the Hebrew Bible and/or New Testaments. Engages with the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, including such areas as feminist theory and criticism, masculinity studies, lesbian and gay studies, and the history of sexuality. Special attention is given to such topics as gendered representations of God, male and female roles and relationships, and homoeroticism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 759 - Formerly BIBST 189 - The Historical Jesus Quest(ion) (3)
A study of the problems of the historical Jesus;, representative lives of Jesus, and the evaluation of synoptic material as a source for historical knowledge of Jesus, as well as the methods, theoretical underpinnings, and ethical-theological interests of the modern quest for Jesus.
Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 701 - Formerly BIBST 701 - Critical Problems in the Study of the Old Testament (3)
A study of critical issues in contemporary research. Topics vary.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 702 - Formerly BIBST 702 - Advanced New Testament Seminar (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 703 - Formerly BIBST 703 - Readings in Hellenistic Texts: Ancient Novels--Jewish, Christian, Pagan (3)
A study of the historical emergence of the novel in the pluralistic cultural context of ancient Mediterranean peoples, double colonized by the culture of hellenism and the empire of Rome. Considering the effects of linguistic stylization and hybridization, irony and appropriation, the course tracks the novel's tendency to disrupt stable boundaries between places, times, and literary genres and explores how perceptions of difference--measured across ethnicity, class, gender, cultic affiliation--are sharpened even as identity is made more complex, malleable, and permeable.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 705 - Formerly BIBST 705 - Hebrew Syntax (3)
Reading knowledge of Hebrew presupposed. Offered in alternate years.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 706 - Formerly BIBST 706 - Greco-Roman Literature (3)
Knowledge of Greek required.
BBST 711 - Formerly BIBST 711 - Hebrew Prophets (3)
A study of the authority, role, and message of the Hebrew prophets. Topics vary.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 712 - Formerly BIBST 712 - Kings, Priests, Families, Women: Official and Popular Religion in Ancient Israel (3)
Taken together, Biblical, archaeological, and inscriptional sources allow us to study the full range of religious practice in ancient Israel. This practice includes both that officially supported by the court (Yahweh, Baal, and, probably, Asherah) and the temple priesthoods (Yahweh and Baal), and the popular practices engaged in by all, especially those focused on the family and the particular practices of women.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 715 - Formerly BIBST 715 - The Synoptic Gospels (3)
Form-critical and redaction-critical investigations of the Synoptic Gospels and their sources. Topics vary.
Course may be repeated. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+175
BBST 716 - Formerly BIBST 716 - Studies in Pauline Literature (3)
Exegetical investigations of problems in the interpretation of the Pauline writings. Topics vary.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 717 - Formerly BIBST 717 - Studies in Johannine Literture (3)
Exegetical investigation of the Fourth Gospel and Johannine Epistles. Topics vary. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 718 - Formerly BIBST 718 - The Bible After Postmodernism (3)
Explores the outer limits of contemporary biblical scholarship through immersion in some of the more innovative and challenging developments in the neighboring field of literacy studies, a field that, more than any other, has shown what postmodernism might mean in academic terms and through attempting, creatively and imaginatively, to bring these developments into dialogue with biblical studies.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 719 - Formerly BIBST 719 - Methods of Biblical Interpretation (3)
An advanced introduction to some of the principal methodologies that have been employed in the critical study of biblical literature, especially biblical narrative, ranging from traditional methodologies, such as source criticism, form criticism and redaction criticism, to new methodologies, such as feminist criticism and poststructuralist criticism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 725 - Formerly BIBST 725 - Late Ancient Judaism (3)
This course will cover the history of Judaism from the Maccabean revolt through Late Antiquity, with emphasis on historiographic issues, e.g., strategies of periodizations, the usefulness of concepts such as "sectarianism" or "hellenization," the emergence of Rabbinism, and the "parting of the ways" between Christianity and Judaism.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111) Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+790
BBST 726 - Formerly BIBST 726 - Gender, Difference, and Election in Israel's Primary Story (3)
Re-examination of the primary story of Israel with attention to the concerns of "others" (women, children, aliens, slaves, the physically challenged, et al.), and exploration of how such a shift in emphasis might invite revisions of commonly held notions of covenant, salvation history, and election.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 727 - Formerly BIBST 727 - The Bible and the Body (3)
Examines biblical understandings and depictions of bodies, both human and divine, and explores how these representations have shaped, and might shape differently, theological and ethical responses to embodied existence. Special attention is given to such topics as gender, sexuality, violence, disease, infertility, physical challenge, and the problems involved in representing the body of God.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+101 or BBST - Formerly BBST - Formerly BIBST+111)
BBST 728 - Formerly BIBST 728 - The Books of Samuel and the Politics of Representation (3)
A study of how the stories of Samuel, Saul, and David are told in the books of Samuel, with attention to the possible political and theological drives that may have shaped their narration in the Bible, and their subsequent representations in Western literature and art.
BBST 731 - Formerly BIBST 731 - Unveiling Revelation (3)
Brings the book of Revelation into dialogue with a variety of critical discourses, notably historical criticism, gender studies, postcolonial studies, and ecocriticism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 734 - Formerly BIBST 734 - Topics in Biblical Theology (3)
The topic of this course changes and is announced at registration.
May be repeated for credit. Offering to be determined.
BBST 735 - Formerly BIBST 735 - Judging Judges (3)
Study of what has been a troubling book for many christians, primarily on account of its violence and God's seeming sanction of, even participation in, that violence. Special attention is given to the book's narrative complexity and moral ambiguity; the ways in which its images continue to permeate contemporary society; and the problem posed by its existence in the biblical canon.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+184
BBST 736 - Formerly BIBST 736 - Feminist Interpretations of the Gospels (3)
Surveys critical readings of the biblical texts proposed by feminist biblical scholars from around the world, paying special attention to the methodology they use, the role of their social location and ideological agendas, and the challenge they post to traditional readings of the Bible.
BBST 737 - Formerly BIBST 737 - The Bible, Colonialism, and Postcolonialism (3)
Using the resources of postcolonial studies, this course will examine selected texts from the Hebrew Bible and New Testament in relation to the perennial theme of empire, and the complex patterns of resistance and collusion that empire invariably elicits.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: (BBST 501 - Formerly BIBST 101 - or BIBST+111)
BBST 738 - Formerly BIBST 738 - Earliest Christianities (3)
This course explores the diversity of early Christian beginnings primarily through the writings of early Christians beyond the New Testament canon. Attention is given to diverse interpretations of Jesus and Judaism, the emergence of church structures and rituals, and the construction of the categories "orthodoxy" and "heresy" in the context of the struggle for authority and identity in the Roman Empire as well as at the intersections between historiography and contemporary religious and political debates.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
BBST 739 - Formerly BIBST 739 - Religions of the Ancient Near East (3)
Study of the religions of Mesopotamia (Sumeria, Babylonia, Assyria), Egypt, Anatolia, and Syria-Palestine (Canaan, Aram) through analysis of literature and archaeological remains. Special attention is given to general religious questions and to the interrelationship of Isreal and other ancient Near Eastern cultures.
Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+169
BBST 742 - Formerly BIBST 742 - Hebrew Bible Exegesis (2-3)
An introduction to exegesis and interpretation of related texts: focus varies.
Course may be repeated. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+103
BBST 743 - Formerly BIBST 743 - New Testament Writings (3)
Exegetical study of the Greek text of selected New Testament writings. Selections vary. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+113
BIBST 745 - The Literature of the Persian Period (3)
This course will examine the literature in the Bible that is formed in the Persian period (539-333 B.C.E.)as the post-exilic community is established and the temple rebuilt. Reading will include Ezra-Nehemiah, Chronicles, and several post exilic prophets as we look at diverse religious responses in the period.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+101
BBST 746 - Formerly BIBST 746 - The New Testament through Non- Western Eyes (3)
A seminar on global hermeneutics and the Bible, via the study and critique of particular interpretations of the New Testament coming from African, Asian, and Latin American perspectives. Attention will be given to critical approaches, issues of identity, colonialism and resistance, and the ideological contrasts with the Western world.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111
BBST 747 - Formerly BIBST 747 - Struggling with Justice Alongside the Bible (3)
This course will examine texts throughout the Bible that provide systems for procedural and distributive justice, retributive responses to lack of justice, and hoped for restoration of the community through acts of reconciliation in response to violence. Beyond the Biblical text the course will examine the contemporary works of restorative justice, truth and reconciliation commissions, Jubilee and debt reduction and other forms of attempts to use the Bible in relationship to contemporary justice issues.
Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+191
BBST 750 - Formerly BIBST 750 - Proverbs in the Bible and African Literature (3)
No description is available for this course. Same as: BBST - Formerly BIBST+158
BBST 754 - Formerly BIBST 754 - The Bible and the Holocaust (3)
This course explores post-holocaust interpretations of the Bible in commentary, art, and literature as well as how the Bible has been employed in genocidal rhetoric.
BBST 755 - Formerly BIBST 755 - Early Christianity Travel Seminar (3)
In this seminar for doctoral students, we will study the material culture and history of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine antiquity, culminating in a 15-day trip to Greece and Turkey. We will visit archaeological sites, museums, and churches and discuss the physical spaces, visual representations, and everyday materiality of the ancient Mediterranean. Course topics include: the built and visual culture of empire, imperial and local religion, the construction of sacred space, religious pilgrimage, asceticism, martyr cults, healing shrines, domestic life, and the theory and politics of archaeology.
BBST 756 - Formerly BIBST 756 - The Exodus Tradition (3)
Through the lens of cultural memory, ethnic identity, and migration studies, the course examines the biblical narrative of Exodus and its re-uses in biblical and extra-biblical texts. Significant focus shall be on portions of the narrative that touch on issues pertinent to the life of a multiethnic community. There will be close readings and exegesis of portions of the exodus narrative, some history of interpretation, and discussions on the literary and social construction of identity in the narrative."
BBST 757 - Formerly BIBST 757 - Lit.of the Hebrew Bible: A Teaching & Learning Practicum (3)
This practicum, to be conducted in conjunction with Biblical Studies 101, is designed exclusively for GDR students in Biblical Studies who are in their second year of course work. The GDR students will attend all meetings of BibSt 101 (approximately 3 hrs, 45 minutes each week) and also meet for an additional hour weekly with the instructor to discuss both the course content and strategies for teaching the subject matter. The students will also have an orientation session prior to the beginning of the semester, as well as a processing session after grades are turned in. Students will do all the assigned reading for the course (on average 50 pages per class session, or approximately 150 pages per week), as well as any collaborative reading needed to fill gaps in their own knowledge (see the description of the annotated bibliography below). The course goals are two: 1) to help students develop their teaching skills; and 2) to provide a structured experience for students to deepen their
BBST 999 - Formerly BIBST 999 - Dissertation Research II (9)
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+998 Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.

CHST - Formerly CHIST

CHST 615 - Formerly CHIST 215 - Studies in Gnosticism (3)
An exploration of an elusive and eclectic ancient religious phenomenon through a reading of the heresiological sources and the Nag Hammadi corpus, in conjunction with recent scholarly literature.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent
CHST 618 - Formerly CHIST 218 - The Thought of Augustine (3)
The thought of Augustine of Hippo based upon extensive readings in his major works.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 619 - Formerly CHIST 219 - Seminar in Medieval Studies (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 631 - Formerly CHIST 231 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Christianity (3)
A seminar engaging both women's history and the history of cultural constructions of gender and sexuality through the readings of the New Testament and other Christian texts of Mediterranean antiquity, in combination with recent works of critical scholarship.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: BBST - Formerly BIBST+111 and CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or their equivalents.
CHST 749 - Formerly CHIST 250 - America: One Nation, One God? (3)
Weaving historical insights and perspectives into current concerns about religion and national identity, this class focuses on major religious movements, personalities, and topics in the United States. It foregrounds the study of American Christian traditions, due to their historical influence, yet also gives some attention to non-Christian religions as well.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or its equivalent
CHST 654 - Formerly CHIST 254 - New England Theology from Edwards to Bushnell (3)
An intensive study of theology in New England from the first Great Awakening through the early Victorian period based upon a critical reading of the major works of Jonathan Edwards and Horace Bushnell.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 655 - Formerly CHIST 255 - God, Sex, and the Making of American Families (3)
This course examines how religious ideas and practices - particularly forms of Christianity - have influenced both private and public understandings of sex and family in the United States. Themes include the regulation of sex practices within and outside of marriage; the conflation of monogamous marriage with virtue and republican ideology; the meanings of domesticity; domesticity's shadows, including slavery and polygamy; and same-sex love and the emergence of modern sexual identities and practices.
Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or equivalent.
CHST 762 - Formerly CHIST 262 - Topics in American Methodism (3)
An intensive study, based on original sources, of selected topics in the rise and development of American Methodism with a view toward defining the nature of the Methodist tradition.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 768 - Formerly CHIST 268 - Race and American Christianity (3)
An intensive consideration of the power of race in American Christian cultures, with an emphasis on recent critical theories of race.
Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+268
CHST 671 - Formerly CHIST 271 - Evangelism and Social Justice: The Social Gospel Movement in Global Perspective: 1880-2000. (3)
This course explores the various modalities of the Social Gospel movement (Romantic, Scientific Modernist, Evangelical, Socialist, etc.) and its ramifying influence in contemporary theology and church life. Of particular focus is the continuing global outreach and manifestation of the "social gospel" approach to evangelism vis a vis "personal gospel" strategies.
CHST 676 - Formerly CHIST 276 - History of Evangelism in US America (3)
This seminar explores the historical patterns of "great awakenings" in North America and their cultural and social impact on USAmerican Christianity. Particular attention will be given to the fluctuating relationship between religion and reform. Various contemporary "movements of the Spirit" will be examined and explored (e.g. charismatic and "third wave" evangelism, media religion and cyberchurch, seeker-sensitive churches, alternative worship, "The New Reformation/Reformission"), and contemporary practices of evangelism will be investigated in terms of their impact on postmodern cultures and emerging churches.
CHST 779 - Formerly CHIST 279 - Revivalism and American Christianity (3)
This course will explore the ways in which scholars have understood the religious phenomenon known as "revival." Using both primary and secondary sources and moving from the early 18th century to the 20th, we will investigate this topic as a historiographical problem and look for new ways to talk about the elements of religious experience that have conventionally been marked as the framework for revivals.
CHST 682 - Formerly CHIST 282 - Is God On Our Side? Religion and U.S. Politics (3)
A study of the influences of religion, particularly Christian traditions, on political developments in the U.S from the early national period up to the present. Themes include the First Amendment and its litigation, Protestant projections of American manifest destiny, religious interventions in contested matters such as family life, the twentieth-century invention of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and the continuing quest to create a Christian America.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+203 or its equivalent
CHST 785 - Formerly CHIST 285 - Readings from the Reformation Era (3)
A consideration both of sources from the "radical (or left wing) of the Reformation" and of recent efforts to "retrieve" some of its themes from the contemporary church. Emphasis falls on issues of discipleship and ecclesiology and the suggestions of some (Hauerwas, Yoder, Little, Durnbaugn, etc.) that these 16th-century European themes are coming into their own in the modern "post-Christendom" era and the American "denominational" scene.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 722 - Formerly CHIST 722 - Readings in Luther (3)
A representative selection of Luther's writings throughout his life, with emphasis on the development of his thought as reflected by his Commentary Romans, his Reformation treatises of 1521, On Bondage of the Will, his various treatises on the Sacrament, and his Galatians Commentary of 1521
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 724 - Formerly CHIST 724 - Readings In Calvin and Reformed Theology (3)
A study of Calvin's theology based on readings of his major works
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 726 - Formerly CHIST 726 - Readings in the English Reformation (3)
The development of the Anglican tradition in the Tudor era (Henry VIII, Edward VI, Elizabeth I), with some attention to Tudor Puritanism. Offering to be determined.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 733 - Formerly CHIST 733 - Seminar in Kierkegaard (3)
A study of Kierkegaard's philosophy and theology based upon a reading of his major works. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 734 - Formerly CHIST 734 - American Religion through Literature (3)
This seminar, intended for doctoral students, is a study of literary and popular works that illumine American religious life in various historical periods. Novels and short stories that criticize and/or satirize the role of clergy and the church will be a particular focus, but we will also take a look at literature that seeks to present new or alternative visions of spirituality. In addition to works of high literary value, such as Nathaniel Hawthornes A Scarlet Letter, we also study 19th century popular novels such as like Elizabeth Phelps The Gates Ajar and the recent bestseller Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins.
CHST 735 - Formerly CHIST 735 - Archives: History and Methods (3)
A study of the theory and practice of religious archives, arranging, describing, evaluating, and using primary source documents in the collections of the United Methodist Archives and History Center. Focuses on preservation, micrographics, scholarly editing, and oral history. Guest lecturers. Each student develops a project based on a collection in the Archives.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+233
CHST 739 - Formerly CHIST 739 - Martyrdom and Asceticism in the Early Church (3)
An examination of martyrdom and asceticism, particularly at their points of intersection and overlap, that focuses on the production of the self as sufferer in ancient Christian martyrology and hagiography, with reference also to Jewish and pagan literatures.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 Same as: CHST - Formerly CHST - Formerly CHIST+294
CHST 748 - Formerly CHIST 748 - Topics in Wesley Studies (3)
Various subjects relating to John and Charles Wesley, their theological formulations, and developments in the Wesleyan tradition.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 750 - Formerly CHIST 750 - Confessions and Confession (3)
This seminar centers on Augustine's Confessions while also using the text to explore more broadly the character of confessional language, literature, ritual. The approach is interdisciplinary and readings potentially include not only Augustine's but also Rousseau's Confessions, as well as selections from the works of such theorists as Peter Brooks, Paul DeMan, Jacques Derrida.
Enrollment priority: Open to doctoral and advanced masters students. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CHST 751 - Formerly CHIST 751 - Empire, Race, and Place: Theorizing Religious Identity in Context (3)
A cross-disciplinary doctoral seminar examining the formation and contestation of religious and ethnic identities in the context of empire. The questions pursued are broadly theoretical and the readings are interdisciplinary, including postcolonial theory, materialist analysis, critical race theory, and critical geography.
Signature of the Instructor required for registration.

CSOC - Formerly CHSOC

CSOC 617 - Formerly CHSOC 417 - Women and Religion (3)
A review of anthropological, sociological, and psychological theory relating to women and, specifically, to women and religion. Combines theoretical readings with cross-cultural case studies designed to put social-scientific theory in conversation with the concrete life situations of specific women. Topics include women's spirituality and religious leadership; the social, political, and economic forces that shape their lives; as well as the relationship between religious imagery about women and the positions they, in fact, occupy in their larger societies.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
CSOC 543 - Formerly CHSOC 443 - The Religious Landscape of the United States (3)
This course is designed to acquaint the theological student with the general and particular landscape of contemporary American religion. Students read in-depth sociological portraits and broad overviews. Liberal and conservative Christianity is covered. In addition, students look at "sects and cults" in new religious movements and old religious movements such as Mormonism and Johovah's Witnesses. Primarily for theological students. Offering to be determined.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.

DOEL

DOEL 801 - Artistic Representations of Leadership: The Medici Effect (4)
"This experience will build upon the intersection of artistic fields, disciplines, and cultures to develop extraordinary new ideas about the phenomenon of leadership. Understand leadership from the perspectives of great musicians, artists, dance, cinema, and literary and poetic genres. Apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of effective leadership to your practice. Develop a professional mission statement that reflects your worldview of leadership.*
DOEL 802 - Historical, Politic., & Global Perspectives on Leadership... (4)
Develop new perspectives about leaders and leadership through historical auto/biographies. Explore the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and management theories, the decision-making processes, power and empowerment, and gender differences. Uncover the essential traits, characteristics, behaviors, and dispositions of great leaders. Examine and analyze the politics of policy and its impact on national, state and local organizations. Question beliefs, values, and perceptions about cultural differences and social justice in the workplace.
Full Title: Historical, Political, and Global Perspectives on Leadership: The Medici Effect. Prerequisite: DOEL+801
DOEL 803 - Creating and Leading Highly Effective Organizat. Systems (3)
Explore contemporary organizational theories about systems and systems thinking. Develop a conceptual framework for understanding organizational phenomena. Recognize the importance of teams within organizational structures. Understand how leadership styles affect organizational culture and climate.
Prerequisite: DOEL+808.
DOEL 804 - Ethical Challenges in the Workplace (3)
Examine ethical dilemmas in the workplace. Authentic case studies will be used to apply ethical norms to organizational structures, processes, and practices.
Prerequisite: DOEL+808.
DOEL 805 - Adaptive Leadership & Change: Navigating Transitions (3)
Examine contemporary theories in managing, assessing, and sustaining change in organizations. Apply the theories to adaptive problems of practice. Connect the theoretical framework of adaptive leadership with change theory.
Prerequisite: DOEL+803, 804.
DOEL 806 - Leadership through Effective Coaching (3)
Develop skills, techniques, and strategies for effective coaching to improve the leader's effectiveness in the performance appraisal process. Identify individual and collective beliefs about effective supervisory behaviors. Design effective performance appraisal processes for the workplace that will result in improved client outcomes.
Prerequisite: DOEL+803, 804.
DOEL 808 - Action Research: Identifying & Crafting Solutions... (6)
"Develop strategies for selecting an adaptive problem of practice. Create a strategic plan; design a formal systematic approach to establishing feedback loops to improve the collaborative action research outcomes that are anticipated in the initial design phase.
Prerequisite: DOEL+801, 802, 810, 811, 812, 813
DOEL 809 - Collaborative Inquiry: Solutions to Adaptive... (3)
Through collaborative inquiry, adaptive problems of practice will be discretely analyzed, alternative solutions will be identified, and the strategic plan from Level I will be revised. Qualitative and quantitative data will be used to support the decision-making process in the discrete analysis of the adaptive problems of practice.
Full Title: Collaborative Inquiry: Solutions to Adaptive Problems of Practice. Prerequisite: DOEL+808.
DOEL 810 - Descriptive Statistics (2)
"Develop understandings about and apply descriptive statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode); measures of dispersion (range, interquartile range, variance, standard deviation); and graphical summaries
DOEL 811 - Descriptive Statistics II (2)
Continue to develop understandings about and applications for descriptive statistics by analyzing research based readings that focus on descriptive statistics.
Prerequisite: DOEL+810
DOEL 812 - Exploring Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs... (2)
"Understand the nature of and philosophical perspectives about qualitative research. Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative methods. Explore the theoretical orientations for ethnography and autoethnography; biography and narrative analysis; orientational qualitative inquiry; phenomenology; grounded theory; and portraiture. Examine studies from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research.
Full Title: Exploring Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs: Making Sense of Action Research I.
DOEL 813 - Exploring Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs... (2)
Develop, implement, and analyze surveys, questionnaires, and interviews. Understand the basis for determining the validity and reliability of qualitative designs. Develop skills in writing about, interpreting, and evaluation qualitative action research. Interpret case studies that use qualitative and mixed research methods. Qualify for IRB application.
Exploring Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs: Making Sense of Action Research II. Prerequisite: DOEL+812
DOEL 814 - Inferential Statistics I (2)
Understand how to use, apply, and interpret t-tests, correlation, and regression. Understand how to use SPSS. Analyze research based readings that focus on inferential statistics.
Prerequisite: DOEL+810, 811, 812, 813
DOEL 815 - Inferential Statistics II (2)
Understand how to use, apply, and interpret ANOVA and Chi-Square. Interpret data using SPSS. Analyze research based readings that focus on inferential statistics.
Prerequisite: DOEL+814.
DOEL 816 - Advancement to the Dissertation Project... (8)
Learning Associates will advance their action research dissertation through seminars and on-line discussions. The Leader-Scholar Community will use collaborative inquiry protocols during this phase of the dissertation process.
Full Title: Advancement to the Dissertation Project: The Leader-Scholar Community. Prerequisite: DOEL+815.
DOEL 817 - Dissertation Completion (8)
Complete the action research dissertation through seminars and on-line discussions. The Leader-Scholar Community will continue to use collaborative inquiry protocols during this phase of the dissertation process.
Prerequisite: DOEL+816.

EDUC - Formerly EDUCG

EDUCG 700 - Learning How to Teach Better (3)
This course is designed for graduate and seminary students who wish to deepen their theoretical and practical foundations as teachers. The emphasis will be on becoming deliberately perceptive and insightful in one's teaching. The course will facilitate the development of knowledgeable, competent, creative, and culturally responsive educations through reflective practices. Our central questions will be: What does it mean to teach effectively in a particular discipline as well as across al disciplines? What are the appropriate and effective ways of teaching in academic settings? Particular attention will be paid to developing sound practices for such issues as: syllabus design, student assessment and grading, student-teacher-subject relations, student diversity, leading a discussion, crafting lectuer, etc. This course is not required, but is recommended for those students who are currently or who are interested in being Teaching Assistants at Drew and who plan to teach in the wider acad
Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+700
EDUCG 701 - Writing Center Theory and Praxis (3)
As writers, teachers, and writing center tutors we face similar questions about the nature of knowledge, learning and thinking, and the process of writing and communicating with others. How does teaching and tutoring writing change our own writing and our understanding of the writing process? How do we develop teaching and tutoring strategies that will work for different situations, students, and writing projects? This course will address four questions: what is a writing consultant, and what is his or her role in higher education? what is knowledge, and how does our concept of knowledge shape our work as writing teachers and tutors? what is learning and how do we assess our efficacy as teachers and tutors? and how do these things inform a writing tutor or teacher's repertoire? The course will combine theories of writing, teaching, and writing center work with practical application through Drew's University Writing Center. Open to all students, the course is strongly recommended for graduate students who plan to teach, undergraduates who hope to attend graduate school and be awarded a teaching assistantship, and writing center tutors who wish to perfect their craft.

ENGL - Formerly ENGLG

ENGLG 818 - Middle English Literature (3)
A study of the major genres of English literature from 1100 to 1500, including drama, allegory, and lyric poetry. Offering to be determined.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 819 - Special Topics in Middle English Literature (3)
Intensive readings in a specific author (Chaucer, Langland), topic (Arthurian romance, Celtic legend), or genre (drama, lyric poetry). Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 820 - 17th-Century Studies (3)
Writers or topics studied vary from year to year. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 821 - 17th-Century Studies (3)
Writers or topics studied vary from year to year. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 822 - Major American Authors (3)
A thorough reading of the work of two or three major American authors. Writers studied vary from year to year.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 823 - Topics in American Literature (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 826 - Literary Criticism (3)
Topics include contemporary criticism, feminist criticism, and history of literary criticism. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 827 - Milton Studies (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 829 - 18th-Century Studies (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration. Offering to be determined.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 831 - 19th-Century Studies (3)
Topics vary to include Romantic and Victorian authors.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 832 - 19th-Century Studies (3)
Topics vary to include Romantic and Victorian authors.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 834 - Shakespeare (3)
An examination of about six major plays-comedy, tragedy, history, romance-accompanied by some discussion of various critical approaches to Shakespeare.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 837 - Renaissance Studies (3)
Topics vary and are announced before registration.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 840 - British Literature and World War I (3)
This course explores the impact of World War I on modernist American and British writers. We will be reading 20th-century writers such as Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield and others. The course seeks to explore such questions as: how did modernist writers find language and literary forms to express the horror of war? How did war impact on issues such as gender and nation? How did World War I contribute to modernist themes such as alienation and changing conceptions of "time" and "reality."
ENGLG 841 - 20th-Century Studies (3)
Writers or topics studied vary from year to year.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
ENGLG 842 - 20th-Century Studies (3)
Writers or topics studied vary from year to year
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 843 - Growing Up Stories:Crossing Borders,Inventing Cul.Def.Sel. (3)
The course focuses on colonial, transnational, and immigrant Bildungsroman, looking at issues of border crossing, ideas of home, and reconstructions of identity in shifting sites. Reading of narratives and poetry are contextualized and theorized through criticism on Bildungsroman and on literatures of immigration and identity as well as other theoretical texts that look at questions of cultural exchange, the transnational, the postcolonial, and the multicultural.
ENGLG 844 - Caribbean Literature (3)
Description Pending
ENGLG 845 - Poetry Crossing Borders (3)
This course seeks to strengthen teachers strategies for evaluating their own interpretations of poetry and responding to their students interpretations of poems. In addition, the course will introduce current scholarship in transnationalism, working on issues related to translation, reception, and revision as texts and people cross borders. We will look both at poetry from other parts of the world (such as African oral poetry and Korean poetry) and at American poets engagement with poets from other linguistic, cultural, and national traditions. Teachers will have an opportunity to use the Dodge Poetry Festival archives to conduct research and/or build curriculum units. Archival Studies students will be able to work with archival materials as well as learn about, and possibly participate in, the process of constructing the archive.
ENGLG 850 - Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition (3)
A systematic review of research in and theories of composition, designed to provide experienced writing teachers with the tools to analyze and strengthen their pedagogies and new teachers with a variety of frameworks within which to locate themselves and develop effective pedagogies. Surveys the history of composition theory and reviews the major theoretical movements in the field today. Explores the practice of composition in light of the various composition theories. Practices examined include textbook selection, syllabus preparation, classroom strategies, assignment design, drafts and revisions, responses to writing, peer-group editing sessions, one-to-one conferences, computers and computer networks, and methods of evaluation.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
ENGLG 900 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
ENGLG 901 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
ENGLG 990 - M.A. Thesis Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
ENGLG 998 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH I (9)
No description is available for this course.

G

G DL8P - Formerly DL8P - MAINTAIN MATRICULATION.,P.T AFTER DISSERTATION SEMESTER
No description is available for this course.Not repeatable without the signature of the Grad Dean and the University Registrar Prerequisite: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+999
G DL9P - Formerly DL9P - Maintaining Matriculation After Dissertation Research II
No description is available for this course. Dean's approval required. Not repeatable without the permission of the University Registrar and the Dean of the Caspersen School. Prerequisite: G+P
G DM1F - Formerly DM1F - MAINTAINING MATRIC F.T. DISS.PROSP PREP., 1ST SEMESTER
No description is available for this course. REQUIRES DEAN AND REGISTRAR APPROVAL.
G DM3P - Formerly DM3P - MAINTAINING MATRIC.,P.T DISS.PROSP.PREP.
No description is available for this course.
G DM4F - Formerly DM4F - MAINTAINING MATRIC. F.T AFTER DISSERTATION SEM. II
No description is available for this course. Dean's written approval required for registration. Prerequisite: F
G DM6P - Formerly DM6P - MAINTAINING MATRIC., P.T. OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. Dean's written approval required for registration.
G MHOP - Formerly MHOP - MAINTAINING MATRIC., P.T. OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. For Medical Humanities Students maintaining matriculation for other reasons than above. Dean's permission required.
G ML8P - Formerly ML8P - MAINTAIN MATRIC.,P.T. THESIS PREP., 1ST SEMESTER
No description is available for this course.
G MLOP - Formerly MLOP - MAINTAINING MATRIC., P.T., OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. For M.Litt students maintaining matriculation for reasons other than above. Part-time, less than half time status. Dean's written permission required.
G MM2P - Formerly MM2P - Maintain Matric, P.T., Language Prep.,2Nd Semester
No description is available for this course. For M.A. students in other all semesters after F (part-time, less than half time status) Prerequisite: G+F
G MM3P - Formerly MM3P - LANGUAGE PREP.,3RD SEMESTER
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: G+P
G MM4P - Formerly MM4P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T., THESIS PREP., SECOND SEMESTER
No description is available for this course. For M.A. students in thesis prep follows F; Not Repeatable (part-time, less than half-time status) Prerequisite: G+F
G MM5P - Formerly MM5P - Maintain Matric., P.T., Thesis Prep 3Rd Semester
No description is available for this course. Dean's written permission required. Prerequisite: G+P
G MM6P - Formerly MM6P - MAINTAINING MATRIC., P.T. THESIS PREP. 4TH SEMESTER
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: P
G MM7P - Formerly MM7P - MAINTAINING MATRIC.,P.T. OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: P
G MMP7 - Formerly MMP7 - MAINTAINING MATRIC.,P.T. OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. Dean's written permission required. For M.A. students maintaining matriculation for reasons other than stated above. (part time, less than half-time status)
G P02F - Formerly P02F - Maintain Matric., F.T., 2Nd Lang Prep., 1St Semester
No description is available for this course. For Ph.D. students not registered for courses while preparing for the second language examination; not repeatable (full-time status) Prerequisite: G+P01F
G P03P - Formerly P03P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T., LANGUAGE PREP., SUB.SEM.I
No description is available for this course. For Ph.D. students after P01F or P02F while preparing for either the first or second language examination; repeatable (part-time, less than half-time status) Prerequisite: (G+P01F or G+P02F)
G P04P - Formerly P04P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T. LANGUAGE PREP.SUB.SEM.II
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: G+P03P
G P07P - Formerly P07P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T., COMP. EXAM PREP., SUB.SEM. I
No description is available for this course. For all Ph.D. students in their third year or subsequent semester(s) of comprehensive exam preparation (after P05F or P06F); repeatable (part-time, less than half-time status) Dean's signature required for registration. Prerequisite: P04F, P05F, or P06F
G P10F - Formerly P10F - MAINTAIN MATRIC., F.T., AFTER DISS.-YEAR WORK I
No description is available for this course. Restricted to Ph.D. students in the first or second semester after the dissertation year work after completing two sem- esters of dissertation research (course , etc.); this can be taken for two semesters only; written permission from the dean required for further sem. (full-time status) Prerequisite: BIBST+999 OR ENGLG+999 OR HISTG+999 OR LITST+999 OR RLSOC+999 OR THEPH+999 OR THRST+999 OR WESME+999
G P11P - Formerly P11P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T. AFTER DISS.-YEAR WORK III
No description is available for this course. For all Ph.D. students who have completed the dissertation research year (, etc.) and two full-time semesters (or two more semesters with dean's permission) of continuing work on the diss. (P10F); repeatable until program limit (part-time, less than half-time status) Dean's signature required for registration. Prerequisite: G+P11F
G P12P - Formerly P12P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T., AFTER DISS.-YEAR WORK IV
No description is available for this course. Not repeatable (part-time, less than half-time status) Dean' signature required for registation. Prerequisite: G+P11P
G P13P - Formerly P13P - MAINTAIN MATRIC.,P.T AFTER DISS.-YEAR WORK V
No description is available for this course. Dean's signature required for registration. Prerequisite: P12P
G P14P - Formerly P14P - Maintain Matric., P.T. After Diss.-Year Work VI
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: P13P
G P15P - Formerly P15P - MAINTAIN MATRIC., P.T. OTHER REASONS
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Dean's written permission required; not repeatable. (part-time less than half time status) Prerequisite: G+P14P

HC

HC 800 - Formerly 800 - Foundation Seminar (3)
A basic survey of the history, methods, theory, and philosophy of historiography. Students will be introduced to diverse approaches to historical research and writing, and they will learn how to assimilate and criticize bodies of scholarly literature. Required for all students in the History and Culture program.
First semester annually.
HC 801 - Formerly 801 - Archives: History and Methods (3)
A study of the theory and practice of archival management, arranging, describing, evaluating, and using primary source documents in the collections of the United Methodist Archives and History Center. Focuses on the place of archives in the history of institutions along with such issues as preservation and description.
HC 802 - Formerly 802 - Interdisciplinary Seminar (3)
This seminar, team-taught by instructors from two different departments, will investigate a common theme from two disciplinary perspectives, comparing and synthesizing the methods used and the questions asked. Topics vary with instructor expertise. Required for all doctoral students in the History and Culture program, but open to other students as well. Offered in alternate years.
HC 803 - Formerly 803 - Seminar in Experimental History (3)
This "history laboratory" will explore innovative approaches to historiography, usually drawn from the instructors own research. Topics vary with instructor expertise.
HC 805 - Formerly 805 - Public Humanities Seminar (1)
Participation is required for PhD students with fellowships, optional for all other students. Students will participate in normally attend this Workshop during their first year. It will meet 7 times (including an introductory session) for two hours every other week in the fall semester. Sessions will have readings and discussions as well as experiential learning activities, such as field trips and guest speakers. There will be a required paper for the class. The workshop will meet less frequently during the spring semester, when students will explore opportunities for internships. During the Spring semester, students will be required to write a public humanities project proposal that will frame their internship. This workshop will be an engaged learning environment that will introduce the vibrant work of public humanities to students, giving them students a sense of the kinds of public humanities projects that exist, the opportunities and challenges in the field, and some backg
It is a 1-c Credit pass/fail course, with a fee to offset the experiential learning activities. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
HC 806 - Formerly 806 - Writing as a Public Intellectu al Workshop (1)
A distinguishing component of H & C is public engagement. This writing workshop introduces advanced Ph.D. students to the practice of writing for the larger public, that is, for intellectually and culturally engaged readers of non-academic print and online media. The goal of the workshop is for each student to learn how to modulate the discursive practices of academic writing into the substantial but accessible writing of a genuinely public intellectual. There will be six sessions over the course of the spring semester.
It is a 1-c Credit pass/fail course, with a fee to offset the experiential learning activities. Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory. Open to current third-year doctoral students of History and Culture and to Ph.D. students in Modern History and Culture and in English Literature.
HC 811 - Formerly 811 - Democracy in America (3)
An examination of American democracy beginning with an extended reading of Alexis de Tocquevilles classic study. Using his analysis as a starting point, students will proceed to consider the development of democracy since Tocquevilles time, the various definitions of democracy that have emerged since then, and the present-day challenges democracy faces. Readings by Tocqueville, Dewey, Zakaria, Wolin, Elshtain, Dahl, and others.
HC 812 - Formerly 812 - American Intellectual History (3)
An exploration of the intellectual currents and practices that have shaped America from the colonial period to the present day. Although emphases will vary from semester to semester, the seminar will mix readings from recognized intellectuals with those of lesser-known figures whose writings provide insight into the intellectual worlds of "ordinary" and marginalized peoples. The seminar aims to provide students with a firm grasp of the forms of intellectual discourse in American history, and the ways in which these discourses have shaped political, social, and cultural outcomes. Typical topics include the Puritan covenant, race theory, manifest destiny, Transcendentalism, domestic ideology, the rise of the natural sciences, evolution, higher education, and pragmatism.
HC 813 - Formerly 813 - Eyes on America: Foreign Observations of the American Scene (3)
America has fascinated writers from other lands since before its European settlement. And Americans are often fascinated and sometimes indignant at the "image in the mirror" these foreign observations offer. This seminar explores the long literature by foreign writers on America and its people beginning with the narratives of early explorers and ending with contemporary commentary on American life and institutions. Students will examine the language, themes, and preconceptions that guide these narratives, along with their American responses.
HC 814 - Formerly 814 - The West in Myth and History (3)
The West had long been a mythic abode, where the realities of exploration, settlement, resource exploitation, federal control, and commercial development often clash with the image of the West as depicted in popular culture. This seminar explores the roots of the myth and its impact on political, social, and cultural outcomes, as well as the historical realities that have shaped the region. Course materials include both texts and film.
HC 815 - Formerly 815 - African-American Social and Intellectual History (3)
A study of the intellectual arguments and social institutions that have empowered African-American leaders and the masses to assert and maintain their humanity within a world of oppression. Focuses on how gender, race, and class have created diverse ideas and opinions among African-Americans and the methods used by African-American intellectuals to analyze these ideas and opinions.
HC 816 - Formerly 816 - Major Problems in the History of American Society: Making Class, Race, and Gender (3)
What are the origins of inequality in American history? What is the relationship between ideological, political, social, and economic developments? This graduate seminar explores these fundamental questions, focusing on a number of major problems for inquiry and debate in the history of nineteenth and twentieth century American society, with particular attention to how class, race, and gender have structured access to power and resources. Readings and discussions will expose students to important developments in the historiography and methodology of American history.
HC 817 - Formerly 817 - The United States and the World (3)
This course will explore US foreign relations during the twentieth century. We will attempt to explain what has historically motivated the architects of US foreign policy and how US leaders have changed within a changing international context. The course will also examine US interaction with the world beyond the realm of traditional policy makers: we will explore the role of state as well non-state actors, private corporations, NGOs, missionaries, and the internationalization/impact of ideas through the writings of scholars, policymakers, and activists as well as historical documents.
HC 818 - Formerly 818 - Topics in American History (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 820 - Formerly 820 - Topics in American Literature (3)
This topics course presents a variety of subjects within American literatiure, including as examples, Willa Carter, Blood America--Cormac McCarthy, the American Political Novel, and the Literature of the American Civil War.
Course may be repeated.
HC 830 - Formerly 830 - Topics in British Literature (3)
Topics vary and are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
HC 831 - Formerly 831 - Shakespeare (3)
This course studies six major plays and the controversies surrounding them: The Taming of the Shrew (gender and marriage), The Merchant of Venice (anti-Semitism), Henry V (war, imperialism, monarchy), Twelfth Night (sexuality/crossdressing), Othello (racism), and The Tempest (post-colonialism). The readings will also include critical and historical studies.
HC 832 - Formerly 832 - A Disunited Kingdom: England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales c. 1800-2000 (3)
When and why did the United Kingdom come into being? What were the steps which led to its conception? Was the creation of the United Kingdom a symptom of national coherence or of disunity between the countries that made up the Union after 1801? Did a new national identity come into being as a consequence, or did old allegiances and loyalties become more deeply embedded? Who were the beneficiaries of the Union? Was the United Kingdom ever really united? Is the eventual breakup of the reconstituted United Kingdom inevitable? These and other questions will be addressed in this course, which examines the interaction between the component parts of the United Kingdom between 1800 and 2000. A number of key topics will be explored through readings in literature and contemporary social observation, including the steps to political union, the role of economic change, religion and education, poverty and social welfare, the rise of political radicalism, and the changing face of national iden
HC 833 - Formerly 833 - Modern British and Imperial History (3)
The world as we know it today was shaped very largely by Great Britain and its Empire. This course surveys the political, social, economic history of modern Britain and its relationship to the larger world. It will cover the rise and fall of British power, industrial society, popular culture, "Victorianism", social reform, "the English national character", the First and Second World Wars, the "Swinging Sixties," and the Thatcher Revolution.
HC 834 - Formerly 834 - The Victorian Mind (3)
This course surveys the great public intellectuals of nineteenth-century Britain, including Thomas Carlyle, John Stuart Mill, John Henry Newman, Charles Darwin, Matthew Arnold, Lewis Carroll, John Ruskin, William Morris, and Oscar Wilde. It addresses such issues as industrialism and its discontents, the class system, democracy and elitism, the definition of culture, educational policy, religion and science, and the social role of the artist.
Course may be repeated.
HC 835 - Formerly 835 - Memory and Commemoration in Irish History (3)
In Ireland, history, memory and commemoration have traditionally played a significant role in shaping contemporary political developments. But they have frequently been divisive, with popular (and even academic) memories of the past being constructed in such a way as to serve current ideological ends. Following an introduction to the key issues in Irish history, the course will focus on a number of major historical events, including the founding of the Orange Order in 1795, the republican uprising in 1798, the Great Hunger of 1845-50, and the Easter Uprising in 1916. These events will be explored in the context of how memory and commemoration have been utilized by different religious and political traditions. The involvement of the Irish diaspora in this process, particularly in the United States and Britain, will also be explored. The course will examine traditional and nontraditional sources such as songs, wall murals, and films. Where appropriate, the Irish experience will be co
HC 836 - Formerly 836 - Visual Representation in Irish History (3)
Visual representations of Ireland have had a significant role in shaping views of the Irish in both positive and negative ways. They have also been divisive, with popular images and caricatures being used to serve particular ideological or social ends. Yet visual images have often been underused as a research tool by historians. This course will focus on a number of key events in Irish history, including the history of the Orange Order, the 1798 Uprising, the Great Hunger, Irish Emigration, the Easter Rising, and "the Troubles". Each topic will be explored by examining contemporary images, and by assessing how these representations have been utilized over time by different religious and political traditions. The representations of the Irish diapsora, in Britain and in the United States, will also be explored. Students will be encouraged to make use of non-traditional sources such as cartoons, photographs, statues, wall murals, postage stamps, flags, maps, films, and coins. Where ap
HC 837 - Formerly 837 - Women in Irish History: Poets, Patriots, Pirates, and Presidents (3)
From St. Brigid in the fifth century to President Mary MacAleese in the twenty-first century, women have played pivotal roles in the development of Ireland. Moreover, the large number of emigrant Irish women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries made their influence felt throughout the world. The remarkable contribution of women to the struggle for Irelands independence was recognized in the 1916 Proclamation, though the 1937 Constitution sought to reassert the primary role of women as wives and mothers. This course will examine and evaluate the contributions of women modern Ireland and ask why their involvement was ignored for so long by Irish historians. It will also assess the role of key figures in the making of Irish history, and will explore the place of women in Ireland today.
HC 838 - Formerly 838 - Northern Ireland: The Rocky Road to Peace (3)
Following its inception in May 1921, politics within the Northern Ireland state was dominated by sectarianism and religious conflict. In order to maintain Protestant hegemony, the civil rights of the minority Catholic population were eroded, both overtly and covertly. Tensions came to a head in the 1960s, but his course will demonstrate how the seeds of violence were sown much earlier. Key events of the conflict such as Bloody Sunday, internment, the murder of Lord Mountbatten, the hunger strikes, the Enniskillen and Omagh bombings, and the steps to the Peace Process will be examined. There will be a special focus on various government enquiries and on accusations of police collusion that have accompanied these investigations. The course will make extensive use of primary evidence.
HC 839 - Formerly 839 - Topics in British and Irish History (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 840 - Formerly 840 - Modern British Intellectuals (3)
This seminar explores the major observers and critics of British society in the twentieth century, including the Fabian Society, the Bloomsbury Group, the modernists, left-wing and right-wing intellectuals of the 1930s, and the "Angry Young Men." It deals with the great public controversies over socialism, feminism, imperialism, the world wars, sexuality, Britain's role in the world, and the theater of ideas.
Course may be repeated.
HC 851 - Formerly 851 - The Renaissance Mind (3)
This course attempts to build up, through readings in the creative writings of the period, a cumulative theory of the Renaissance. Writers covered include Poggio Bracciolini, Pico della Mirandola, Baldassare Castiglione, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas More, Francois Rabelais, Francis Bacon, Michel de Montaigne, Thomas Wyatt, Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe, and John Webster.
HC 854 - Formerly 852 - Abolition and Anti-Slavery in Europe, with special reference to Britain, France, & Ireland c. 1789-1865 (3)
In the late nineteenth century, opposition to slavery was spreading in Europe, mostly due to the involvement of dissenters and radicals. French revolutionaries banned slavery within the French Empire after 1789, a decision reversed by Napoleon and then restored in 1848. The British parliament banned the slave trade in 1807 and slavery in 1833: both acts were supported by Irish MPs. After 1833, opponents of slavery in Europe (notably the Irish Catholic Daniel OConnell) increasingly turned their attention to Abolition in America. This course examines anti-slavery agitation in Europe and its connections with American Abolition.
HC 853 - Formerly 853 - The Tower and the Abyss: 19th Century European Intellectual and Cultural History (3)
This course examines the major thinkers and analytic paradigms of the nineteenth century. It studies exemplary works of fiction, exploring the relationship between literature, philosophy, and social theory. A major theme is the cultural and political impact of the perceiveddecline, absence, or death of God, and the ways that ideology,history, science, and art came to occupy the space "vacated" byreligion. We will read texts by or about the Romantics, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill, Kierkegaard, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, George Eliot, and Nietzsche, among others.
HC 854 - Progress, Power, and Catastrophe: 20th Century European Intellectual and Cultural History (3)
This course explores the rich intellectual life of the twentieth century, focusing on how key thinkers both contributed and responded to the enormous dislocations of European modernity. The class takes upthe radical challenges to the Enlightenment heritage; the promise and perils of politics as a means of redemption; the search for ethical commitment and moral order in the absence of absolutes; the critique of power as it operates in knowledge, institutions, and technology; and different visions of liberation. Individual units are devoted to psychoanalysis, western Marxism, existentialism, feminism, and post-structuralism; featured thinkers include Freud, Adorno, Horkheimer, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Marcuse, Foucault, Baudrillard, and Zizek, among others.
HC 855 - Formerly 855 - Topics in European History (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 871 - Formerly 871 - The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade & the Making of the Modern World (3)
This world history course focuses on the global dynamics of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, its impact on world history from the 16th to the 19th century and its repercussions today. The course raises a fundamental question, "What were the origins and dynamics of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and how has it shaped economic, political, religious, gender and racial identities in the modern world?" Through lectures, discussion, journal writing, book reviews and research in primary documents, students study the nature of global interactions between peoples and cultures through several humanities disciplines such as history, literature and religion. The seminar also focuses on the centrality of Christianity as (1) an incentive and rationale for slavery from the 16th to the 18th centuries; (2) the foundation for moral arguments against slavery in the 19th century; and (3) one of the central components behind cultural change and identity formation for over three centuries. The nature of g
HC 872 - Formerly 872 - The Springtime of the Peoples? (3)
1848 marked a watershed in nineteenth-century European political history, despite the fact that many of the uprisings associated with this year were quickly put down. The repercussions of this short-lived revolutionary activity were felt as far away as Australia, Cape Town (South Africa) and in North and South America. This course examines the impact of the 1848 revolutions, placing these political upheavals in the context of other cultural, technological and ideological changes that were taking place, both in Europe and elsewhere.
HC 873 - Formerly 873 - Age of Revolutions c. 1688 to 1917 (3)
This course examines the revolutionary continuum that swept the world in the long eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It begins with Britains "Glorious Revolution" of 1688, examines Americas War of Independence (or was it a "Revolution"?), and continues through the global revolutionary year of 1848 and beyond. Throughout the course, the various revolutions examined will be placed in their wider social, cultural, scientific, and ideological contexts.
HC 874 - Formerly 874 - The Empire Strikes Back: The Struggles for Independence from the British Empire, with special reference to China, India, and Ireland (3)
In 1921 the British Empire was the largest empire in history, including one-quarter of the world's population. Yet, starting with the loss of the American colonies in the eighteenth century, the history of the British Empire was also a history of multiple struggles to achieve independence by the colonised territories. But independence was often slow to come, and the outcome was sometimes partial and piecemeal, creating fresh problems for the new governments. With special attention to China, India, and Ireland, this course will examine the struggles to win independence from Britain. It will ask why limited Home Rule was granted in some British territories but not in others during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, what steps were taken by the native populations to achieve political independence, how the British state responded to these challenges, what was the longer-term legacy of the British Empire, and what lessons can be drawn by imperial powers in the twenty-first
HC 875 - Formerly 875 - Here, There, and Everywhere: The 1960s as Global History (3)
This class, organized around the tumultuous year 1968, looks at the 1960s in international perspective, exploring the connections between events, social movements, key figures, and forms of cultural expression in disparate regions. It focuses on the dramatic challenges to entrenched forms of political, economic, and military power, as well as to hierarchies of race, gender, and class. It explores the meaning of the 1960s as "living history," both by considering representations of the era within popular memory and by employing some of the experimental pedagogy of the 1960s. Key texts include works of history, memoirs, social theory, and literature, as well as films and popular music. Units will cover events in the United States, Europe, and Latin America; the international "language of dissent"; global countercultures; transformations of everyday life; and the question of legacies.
HC 876 - Formerly 876 - Topics in Global History (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 877 - Formerly 877 - Modern Jewish Intellectual History 1650-1950 (3)
This course will explore the impact on Jewish thought and religion of modernity, beginning with the radical critique of religion by Baruch Spinoza. The course analyzes the Haskalah, or Hebrew Enlightenment, from its inception by Moses Mendelssohn in late eighteenth century to the emergence of the Reform movement, as well as its various permutations in Eastern European Jewish thought, through to the emergence of Zionism. It will conclude with an overview of the post-Holocaust denominations of American Judaism with a particular focus on the theology of Mordechai Kaplan, the founder of Reconstructionist Judaism.
HC 881 - Formerly 881 - Experts, Intellectuals, and Scientists: History and the Socioloy of Knowledge (3)
Conceptions of the role of the expert, the intellectual, and especially the scientist have shifted dramatically over the course of the twentieth century, resulting in radical changes in the image and authority of each. Starting with foundational texts in the history of the sociology of knowledge, this course seeks to treat "science" as a particular case study in the broader history of intellectual expertise. From early gentlemens agreements at the Royal Society to the all-out science wars of the 1990s, and from large macroscale concerns that attempted to relate science to democracy and Marxism (both of which treated science as a distinctive and objective form of knowledge) to later provocative microscale studies that challenged received notions of "truth", "fact" and "scientist" altogether, we will incorporate perspectives from classical sociology, anthropology, epistemology, and literary theory, along with critiques from gender studies and science studies, in an attempt to better un
HC 882 - Formerly 882 - Secrets of Life: The History of Genetics in the 20th Century (3)
This course surveys the history of geneticsone of the paradigmatic life sciences of the twentieth centuryfrom experimental plant and animal breeding at the dawn of the twentieth century to the completion of the Human Genome Project by the century's end. We will follow a series of famous geneticists in their quest to understand and ultimately to control the hereditary substance, from the first coining of the word "gene" in 1909 to present-day attempts to manufacture life in the test tube. From the invention of hybrid corn and other new synthetic species during the emergence of classical genetics, to the discovery of the structure of DNA, the cracking of the genetic code, and the rise of biotechnology, geneticists have sought to use their knowledge to find solutions to humanity's many ills. They have alsosometimes deliberately, sometimes inadvertentlypromoted the social application of genetical principles in a field often described as "eugenics." Science, technology, society, and polit
HC 883 - Formerly 883 - Knowledge in Motion: Local Science, World Contexts (3)
This course surveys the history of science from the dawn of agriculture to the present day, seeking to move beyond classic accounts of "the West and the rest" to examine the history of science in the global contextand in the process, to challenge our very notions of science itself. Topics to be explored include the history of ancient, Arabic, and medieval European science and mathematics; the "Scientific Revolution" and the new uses of mixed mathematics in astronomy and natural philosophy; and the integration of biological and other field sciences with larger colonialist and nationalist projects. We will broaden our understanding of the contributions of various world cultures to the history of science, and explore the ways in which particular local cultural realities make certain kinds of scientific developments possible. We will pay particular attention to places and practices of knowledge (school, laboratory, field, museum, journal); the relations of science/mathematics and religio
HC 884 - Formerly 884 - Gender, Sexuality, and Medicine in Modern Europe (3)
Medicine has played a crucial role in the way we understand and experience gender and sexuality in the modern era. Recent years have seen the emergence of a growing body of historical literature that addresses these issues, concentrating on such themes as attempts to control sexual behavior, ideas of femininity and masculinity in clinical diagnoses, the "invention" of homosexuality, and the impact of gender on the production of medical knowledge. In this seminar we will explore some of these themes by examining several distinct settings in which modern medicine has helped shape and been shaped by ideas about gender and sexuality.
HC 885 - Formerly 885 - History of the Body (3)
From eugenics to bodybuilding, tattooing to anorexia, cosmetic surgery to reproductive technology: in modern times the body has been the site of the most personal and the most political battles. Various experts and historical actors have sought to understand, discipline, and shape it to conform to a variety of agendas. Rather than remaining unchanged over time, the human body (and our experience of it) has evolved in response to such pressures. This seminar explores major themes in the history of the body in the modern Western world. We will probe the myth of the ideal body and explore historical attempts to construct a "normal" body. We will examine a wide range of practices through which individuals have attempted to shape their identities through the reshaping of their bodies. Finally, we will explore the medicalization of the body and the role of science as an authoritative discourse in this process.
HC 886 - Formerly 886 - Topics in the History of Science (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 887 - Formerly 887 - Topics in Art History (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HC 891 - Formerly 891 - The Classical Tradition in the 19th and 20th Centuries (3)
Major landmarks in the history of ideas, both American and European, historical and literary, engaged with the past of Greece and Rome. How did major thinkers, and even the most radically innovative movements, use and change that tradition in order to move forward? Topics covered include the Renaissance, the American founders, the French Revolution, the modern humanistic university, Romantic philhellenism, Matthew Arnold, Friedrich Nietzsche, James Frazer, Modernism, James Joyce, Leo Strauss, and current issues. No prior knowledge of classical antiquity is required.
HC 892 - Formerly 892 - Utopias and Utopian Thought (3)
Since ancient times the perceived ills of the world as it isin short, of historyhave led people to imagine a perfect world. Utopian dreams can take the form of fiction (hopeful, satirical, or dystopian), religious movements, revolutionary programs, alternative communities, or symbolic enactments seen in festivals and Worlds Fairs. Can we radically change the conditions of human nature and society in the real world? Topics include Platos Republic,the Bible, Mores Utopia,the French Revolution, utopian socialists and Marx, Edward Bellamy and William Morri, We and twentieth-century dystopias, theorists, the World Wide Web, and the future of utopia.
HC 893 - Formerly 893 - The History of the Book (3)
A global survey of the social, economic, and political history of print, and its use as a medium to disseminate ideas. Topics include the history of printing, literacy, publishing, reading, censorship, intellectual property, the profession of letters, academic literary studies, canon formation, lexicography, libraries, and journalism.
HC 894 - Formerly 894 - Topics in the History of The Book: (3)
Topics vary with instructor expertise."
HC 895 - Formerly 895 - Topics in Memory Studies: (3)
This course topic explores the study of public memory through a historical approach, in order to analyze issues of identity politics and political transition. Topics will analyze why certain forms of memory emerge when and where they do, and in what form (museums, postcards, annual parades, or temporary artistic spaces); including the impetus to remember, appropriate forms and technologies of memory, monuments, the production of a memorial site, and the inaugural rituals associated with its public unveiling, and the life of the "monument" or the national memory of an event, period or person. Also explored is the impact when second and subsequent generations inherit sites and public memories. Topic varies.
Course may be repeated.
HC 896 - Formerly 896 - Topics in Modernism: (3)
This course topic explores the Modernism movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including literature, history, culture, art, and music. Topics will investigate the activities and output of those who felt the "traditional" forms of art, architecture, literature, religious faith, social organization and daily life were becoming outdated in the new economic, social and political conditions of an emerging fully industrialized world. Topic varies.
Course may be repeated.
HC 990 - Formerly 990 - Research Tutorial (3)
All Ph.D. and M.A. students must take a Research Tutorial, normally in their final semester of course work, where each student will produce an original and publishable scholarly paper. The tutorial introduces students to archival research, the apparatus of scholarship, and the art of presenting papers at conferences and publishing them. Students in this tutorial work mainly independently but under faculty supervision.
Dean's approval required for registration.

HIST - Formerly HISTG

HIST 821 - Formerly HISTG 121 - Philosophy of Science (3)
A study of the theory of scientific explanation. Other topics include the logic of confirmation and of disconfirmation, the nature of scientific laws, and the marks of pseudo-science.
The following cognate courses are offered in conjunction with the College of Liberal Arts. To earn credit in these courses, graduate students must perform additional, graduate-level assignments. Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 800 - Historiography (3)
Concentrating on European and American intellectual historiography, this deals with the main trends and methods in modern intellectual history as the development of intellectual history from the 19th century to the present. Students are expected to read extensively in major works by intellectual cultural historians and give written and oral reports on their reading.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered first semester annually
HIST 802 - Formerly HISTG 802 - Utopias and Utopian Thought (3)
This seminar considers "Ideal alternative communities" in theory, imagination and practice, from the Bible to the World Wide Web. Topics, drawn from literature, religion, politics, and film may include Plato's Republic, More's Utopia, Mercier, Marx and Engels, utopian socialist communities, the French and Soviet Revolutions, Edward Bellamy, William Morris, Gilman's Herland, Zamyatin's We, Isaiah Berlin, Karl Popper, and world's fairs.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 803 - European Intellectual History I: 18th Century (3)
An introduction to the major ideas of the 18th century through the study of selected primary sources and interpretive texts.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 804 - European Intellectual History II: 19th Century (3)
An introduction to the major ideas of the 19th century through the study of selected primary sources and interpretive texts. Concentrates on the Romantic reaction to the Enlightenment, the development of liberalism and socialism, historicism, positivism, and the revolt against positivism during the fin de siecle.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 805 - European Intellectual History III: 20th Century (3)
An Introduction to the major ideas of the 20th century through the study of selected primary sources and interpretive texts. Concentrates on neo-Marxian thought, the Frankfurt School, existentialism, structuralism, and post-structuralist thought.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually
HISTG 806 - Topics in European Cultural Hi story (3)
Topics in European cultural history vary with instruct interest and expertise.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 807 - The Classical Tradition in the 19th and 20th Centuries (3)
This course traces the influence and transformation of the classical Greek and Roman traditions though some of the seminal social movements and thinkers of modern times. It considers how even the most innovative and radical trends in modern politics, literature, philosophy, psychology, and anthropology have engaged in an extended conversation with the past. No prior knowledge of classical antiquity is required.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 810 - History of Science I: 19th Century (3)
An examination of the cultural relations of science in the 19th century. The emphasis is on the interactions between science and literature, philosophy, and religion in Europe, British, and American contexts. Surveys the development of Romantic science, Victorian evolutionary naturalism, and classical physics as well as developments in medicine and technology. Attention is paid to contemporary social constructivist and feminist analyses of science.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 812 - History of Science II: 20th Century (3)
A 20th-century continuation of HIST - Formerly HISTG+810 that examines the cultural relations of science in the century. Emphasizes the interactions between science and literature, philosophy, and religion in European, British, and American contexts. Gives attention to contemporary social constructivist and feminist analyses of science.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 813 - Science in Victorian Culture (3)
An examination of the cultural relationship of science in Victorian Britain. The theories, personalities, and institutions of Victorian science form the touchstone for studying the connections between 1)science and Victorian belief systems, 2)science and Victorian social theory, and 3)science and Victorian feminism.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 814 - Topics in the History of Science (3)
Topics in the history of science vary with instructor interest and expertise and are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 815 - 19th-Century Russian Thought (3)
An introduction to the major movements in 19th-century Russian thought through the study primary sources and interpretive texts. Concentrates on romanticism, socialism, scientific materialism, nihilism, and anarchism, as well as the roles of science and art in society.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 817 - British Intellectual History I : 19th Century (3)
An introduction to the most influential British thinkers of the 19th century, concentrating mainly on primary texts. Treats such themes as the response to industrialism, liberalism and socialism, the philosophy of education, and the roles of science and art in society.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 818 - British Intellectual History I I: 20th Century (3)
A continuation of HIST - Formerly HISTG+817, focusing on the Fabian socialists, the Bloomsbury group, the rise of literary modernism, the intellectual consequences of the two world wars, the "Red" thirties, science and culture, and the theater of ideas.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 819 - Topics in British Intellectual History (3)
Topics in British intellectual history vary with instructor interest and expertise and are announced prior to registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined
HISTG 820 - American Intellectual History I: 17th - Mid 19th Century (3)
An introduction to major figures in American thought from Jonathon Edwards to John Dewey. Includes attention to shifting theological and philosophical currents as related to changes in American social ethos.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 821 - American Intellectual History II Late 19th to Late 20th Century (3)
This readings based seminar focuses on main currents of American intellectual thought and culture, with an emphasis on pragmatism and its legacies, literary radicalism, social science history, cultural criticism, and American modernist and postmodernist preoccupations.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 822 - The Liberal Tradition in American Thought and Culture (3)
This course is an intellectual and political history of American liberal thought, from the late 19th century to the present. Examining questions about the public and its capacities, the state and its responsibilities, the relationship between the left and the center, the role of experts, the rise of mass society, the national security state, and liberalism's relationship to civil rights, it considers how key historical actors, as well as contemporary historians and theorists, have transformed liberalism as an ideology and set of beliefs that have dominated American political and cultural thought in the 20th century.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 823 - Topics in American Intellectual History (3)
Topics in American intellectual history vary with instructor interest and expertise.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 824 - The History of the Book in Britain and Europe (3)
A survey of the social, economic, and political history of print in Britain, continental Europe, and America. Topics include the history of printing, literacy, publishing, reading, censorship, intellectual property, the profession of letters, academic literary studies, canon formation, lexicography, libraries, and journalism.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually.
HISTG 825 - The History of the Book in America (3)
See BKHS - Formerly BKHS - Formerly BKHIS+800 for course description.
Same as: BKHS - Formerly BKHS - Formerly BKHIS+800
HISTG 826 - Popular Culture and its Critics (3)
Designed as a collective exploration of the intellectual history of American popular culture criticism, this course will depend on close readings and intensive student involvement. We will examine different literatures about popular or "mass"-culture and its supposed effects, its production, and its patterns of consumption, drawing on historical critiques as well as recent analyses of particular genres. The purpose will be to understand the categories of analysis intellectuals have traditionally employed, to examine how those categories have changed over time, and to consider what we have gained intellectually (or politically, or culturally) from the recent expansion of popular culture studies and cultural history, within the humanities and social sciences.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 827 - Topics in Intellectual History (3)
Topics in intellectual history vary with instructor interest and expertise.
Course may be repeated.
HISTG 828 - America in the 1940s and 1950s: Culture, Politics and Society (3)
This course explores the major themes and developments in the United States society during the post-World War II era. Particular attention is paid to mass culture and those voices speaking out in opposition to it.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
HISTG 835 - African-American Social and Intellectual History (3)
A study of the intellectual arguments and social institutions that have empowered African-American leaders and the masses to assert and maintain their humanity within a world of oppression. Focuses on how gender, race, and class have created diverse ideas and opinions among African-Americans and the methods used by African-American intellectuals to analyze these ideas and opinions.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 839 - History and Memory in Modern Western Society (3)
This seminar explores the burgeoning historical field of memory studies, with a focus on both the substantive and theoretical issues raised in the literature. What is collective memory? Are history and memory separate entities? Does memory offer a fix to the historiographical Gordian Knot, or is the fix an illusion? Does memory provide subaltern groups the means to resist mainstream historical narrative? And what ideological purposes does collective memory serve in mainstream culture? Topics to be covered include the American Revolutionary Era, the American Civil War, Modern France, the Holocaust and Postwar Germany, with readings by Halbwachs, Nora, Yerushalmi, Schudson, Bodnar, and more.
HISTG 840 - Modern Jewish History (3)
A study of the development of modern consciousness throughout the social and cultural experiences of Jews and Jewish communities from the Enlightenment to the present. Surveys major developments in European and American history that have shaped Jewish identities; explores the diversity of Jewish experience in the West and the Middle East. Emphasizes the shaping of modern consciouness in Jewish psycho-cultural and spiritual responses to acculturation and secularization. Themes include orthodoxy and reform, assimilation, nationalism, identity, anti-Semitism and self-hatred, genocide and Zionism
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered Spring semester annually Same as: HIST+40
HISTG 842 - Gender, Sexuality, and Medicine in Modern Europe (3)
No description is available for this course.
HISTG 844 - Great Britain and the World (3)
In the nineteenth century, one out of every four human beings on earth was a subject of Queen Victoria. With the exception of the United States, no nation in history has ever enjoyed the global power, economic dominance, and international cultural influence once exercised by Great Britain. The world as we know it today was shaped very largely by the British Empire. This course surveys the political, social, economic history of modern Britain and its relationship to the larger world. It will cover the rise and fall of British power, industrial society, parliamentary politics, popular culture, "Victorianism" and "modernity", sexuality, the First and Second World Wars, and postindustrial Britain, among other topics.
HISTG 845 - Here,There, and Everywhere: The 1960s as Global History (3)
No recent decade has been so powerfully transformative in the United States and much of the world as have the 1960s. The era's social movements -- from civil rights, to feminism, youth protest, environmentalism, and nascent conservatism -- dramatically changed the political culture of the developed West. Decolonization struggles, cresting in the 1960s, altered the nature and balance of global power, while, in communist Europe, democracy movements set the stage for full-scale revolutions that ended the Cold War.. So too, no decade has had such an enduring grip on politics, culture, and consciousness. This class explores the 1960s as international history, focusing on global conflicts and protest cultures. Separate units will treat key events, figures, and themes in the United States, Western and Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia, stressing the interconnection between disparate movements and experiences. The course material will range widely to include politics, music, the visual arts, and film.
HISTG 846 - Eyes on Amer:Foreign Observers of the American Scene (3)
Since its first discovery and settlement, the United States has fascinated observers from other lands. They have produced a body of literature ranging from the perceptively analytic, as in the case of Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America to the purely imaginative, as in Franz Kafka's novel Amerika, to the witheringly satirical, as in the recent film Borat. Americans, for their part, have been alternately fascinated, indignant, or nonplussed by the "image in the mirror" these foreign observers offer. Employing works from the seventeenth through the twentieth century, this seminar explores the foreign commentary on America and the American response to this commentary. Seminar objectives include developing an understanding of the broad themes that have informed foreign observations of America, the themes and issues animating the American response, and the historical contexts influencing both the production and reception of these observations. We also consider why some commentaries-Tocqueville's Democracy being the prime example-to exert a strong pull on American self image.
HISTG 848 - In Search of the Amer.Dream Immigration,Labor,&Culture (3)
Description Pending.
HISTG 850 - Interdisciplinary Research Seminar (3)
A joint seminar, team-taught by history and English faculty, that focuses each year on a different topic in modern cultural history.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
HISTG 998 - Dissertation Research (9)
No description is available for this course.

INTD - Formerly INTEC

INTEC 910 - Religion, Space, and Place (3)
A cross-disciplinary doctoral seminar that explores the way that religionproduces and is produced by our conceptions of spaceand place. Taking a multi-religious case study approach, we will examine how religious language, spaces, and gestures map the cosmos and landscape, navigate movement and change, and locate personal and communal identity in spaceand time, particularly in the context of the changing spatializations of empire, globalization, and inter-cultural contact and conflict. The questions pursued are broadly theoretical and the readings are interdisciplinary, including the philosophy of space/place, critical geography, postcolonial theory, materialist analysis, critical race theory. Students will be encouraged to develop research projects rooted in their particular disciplines

INTR - Formerly INTRG

INTRG 900 - Internship (1)
This course allows students to supplement their academic knowledge with hands-on experience through work in their field of study. Students will put into practice to gauge its effectiveness in real life settings. Students will be monitored by an adviser and complete a project relating to their internship. Given the intense nature of the Caspersen School programs, it is advised that students begin internships soon after arriving at Drew to obtain the maximum benefit. Successful completion of 3 credits of internship allows the student to receive Internship Certification, which is placed on the student's official transcript.
This course can be repeated with a new project. Signature of instructor required for registration.

LING

LING 220 - Formerly 105 - History and Structure of the English Language (4)
A study of the development of English from Anglo-Saxon to its present status as a global language. Examines the historical development of theories attempting to explain English, its styles, dialects, and literatures. Recommended: LING+10.

LITS - Formerly LITST

LITST 708 - Liturgical Time (3)
An intensive study of the liturgical articulation of time, the origin and development of feasts, fasts, and seasons, and their pastoral implementation in calendar and lectionary.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 712 - Christian Initiation (3)
A study of the rites of Christian initiation in their origins and historical development in both East and West, with theological reflection and discussion of pastoral practice in ecumenical perspective.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505
LITST 716 - Sacred Meals in the Household of Christ (3)
A study of the origins of Christianity's sacred meals, and the historical development, doctrinal perspectives, relationship of word and table, and contemporary rites and pastoral practice.
Prerequisite: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+505
LITST 722 - Liturgical Reformers and Movements (3)
A seminar focusing on particular liturgical figures or movements in the history of liturgical studies.
LITST 723 - Topics in Liturgical Spirituality (3)
A seminar focusing on topics such as prayer, pilgrimage, or religious community such as Taize.
Course may be repeated.
LITST 730 - Early Christian Liturgies (3)
To provide a doctoral-level survey of the primary documentary evidence from which we get our knowledge of Christian liturgical practices and understandings in the period from the writing of the New Testament documents to the death of Gregory the Great (604 C.E.), to understand them in their cultural contexts and in light of Christianity's Jewish and pagan heritages, engaging both the major primary sources and the principal secondary literature.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 732 - Major Figures or Movements in the History of Preaching (3)
A seminar focusing on key preachers or movements in the history of homiletics.
Course may be repeated.
LITST 733 - Ecchesiastical Latin (3)
To introduce students to the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ecclesiastical Latin. Emphasis will be placed on those fundamental points of grammar which will enable students with the help of a dictionary to read and translate original documents on their own.
This course, successfully completed, will meet the area's requirement for a language.
LITST 734 - Medieval Law and Liturgy (3)
This course will focus on the various intersections between medieval canon law and liturgy. In so doing, it will serve as a general introduction to both disciplines (Canon Law and Liturgy) in the Middle Ages.
LITST 735 - Hymnology (3)
A study of the hymn in Christian worship, with emphasis on great hymn writers of the past, contemporary writers, and the composers of hymn tunes. Emphasizes the hymn traditions of America and Europe, but gives attention to the congregational music of African and Asian Christianity. Designed for graduate students and advanced theological students.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 736 - Arts and Liturgy (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+566
LITST 738 - Reformation Liturgies (3)
An intensive study of liturgical orders produced by the various strands of the 16th-century Reformation. Emphasizes Lutheran orders in Germany and Denmark, Reformed orders in Switzerland, Germany, and England, and Anglican orders of the Edwardian reform and Marian exile. Features the respective roles and influence of such leaders as Luther, Bucer, Calvin, a Lasco, and Cranmer.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 739 - Ecumenical Theology/Modern Liturgies (3)
A cycle of seminars, each examining vital ecumenical concerns. The seminars include Theology of Religions in the Ecumenical Movement; Ecclesiology and Ethics; Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation; Dialogue and Mission; The "Ecumenical" and the "Evangelical"; and History, Development, and Prospects of the Ecumenical Movement.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
LITST 741 - Liturgical Traditions (3)
Intensive studies of the major liturgical traditions, normally offered as tutorials, chosen from the following: African-American, Asian-American, Anglican, Hispanic, Lutheran, Jewish, Orthodox, Reformed, Pentecostal, and Roman Catholic.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
LITST 749 - Narrative Preaching (3)
This seminar will engage in the study of the stories and structures of narrative preaching. The major emphases of narrative theology (life story, canonical stories, and community story) will be explored through the work of key scholars/preachers in the field. The course will also include consideration of the role of testimony in forming individual and communal identify in faith communities strongly shaped by oral tradition. Biblical narrative, story telling, and sermon construction will be part of the course.
Same as PSTH - Formerly PASTH+544
LITST 751 - Sacramental Preaching (3)
This seminar will address two major aspects of preaching: 1) the theology of preaching as sacramental and 2) preaching on the sacraments. Ancient through post-modern preaching texts will be used to develop a genre of preaching understood as mystagogy, preaching that communicates the mysteries of Christian faith, and the means of grace through which believers encounter the real presence of Christ. Just as a pulpit/ambo is located between the font and the table, this course will focus on preaching as the intersection where "commonplace things are lifted up for holy use". Sermon preparation and evaluation is required as part of the course assignment.
LITST 762 - Studies in Ritual and Liturgy (3)
An exploration of the values and normative messages that are embedded in and transmitted by the liturgical rituals of a worshipping community. Attention will be given to the structure, process, and function of particular Christian rituals and of ritualizing in general, including attention to the important parallels between ritual theory and liturgical studies.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 766 - Women, Word, and Worship (3)
An examination of experiential, theological, cultural, and scriptural issues of women and worship. Preaching, public prayer, sacramental presence, authority are explored in various traditions and historical periods.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
LITST 990 - M.A. Thesis Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.
LITST 999 - Dissertation Research II (9)
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: LITS - Formerly LITST+998 Offered in fall and spring semesters annually.

LGON - Formerly LOGON

LGON 735 - Formerly LOGON 735 - Hymnology (3)
A study of the hymn in Christian worship with emphasis on great hymn writers of the past, contemporary writers, and the composers of hymn tunes. Although the course emphasizes the hymn traditions of America and Europe, attention is given to the congregational music of African and Asian Christianity as well. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced theological students.

MAT

MAT 800 - Formerly 800 - School & Society: American Schooling from its Origins to the Global Era (3)
This course provides students with an overview of the history and philosophy of education in the United States. It investigates key issues such as literacy, diversity and equity, the education of teachers, and school reform from historical and contemporary perspectives. Major educational philosophies are studied as they develop and change in various historical eras. The course also examines how globalization and large scale immigration are affecting schooling and youth.
MAT 801 - Formerly 801 - The Adolescent Learner (3)
This course focuses upon adolescent development from both psychological and cross- cultural perspectives. Major theories of learning and cognition are studied in-depth, with an emphasis upon their application to the adolescent learner. (Fieldwork required in suburban setting)
MAT 803 - Formerly 803 - Integrating Technology in the Content Classroom (3)
This course explores the impact of new information, communication, and media technologies on the global economy. Students learn how to integrate technology into the content area classroom.
MAT 804 - Formerly 804 - Human Diversity (3)
This course focuses upon the socio-cultural context of education in the Global Era. It examines the role of language and culture in identity formation, communication and learning styles. It explores racism, discrimination, and structural factors that contribute to inequality of opportunity. In addition, the course includes: principles and strategies for teaching students from various cultural and ethnic backgrounds, English Language Learners, and methods for working with students' families (Fieldwork required in urban setting)
MAT 808 - Formerly 808 - Instructional Design And Assessment: (3)
This course provides a theoretical orientation to curriculum design and assessment. Students learn to design units aligned to state and national content standards using Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe's Understanding by Design (UbD) as a framework. Students study current debates in assessment and learn to create and utilize traditional and authentic assessments for both formative and summative purposes.
MAT 809 - Formerly 809 - Methods of Teaching in the Student's Content Area (3)
will be offered in the disciplines of Math, Science, Social Studies, English and World Languages) This course examines the key debates in the respective fields of study and provides students with essential pedagogical content knowledge and strategies. It builds upon the theoretical, philosophical, and cognitive foundations developed in the School and Society and the Adolescent Learner by concretely demonstrating the differences between direct and constructivist approaches and focuses upon lesson plan development. The course is taken in conjunction with a core course in the students' content areas.
MAT 810 - Formerly 810 - Working With Students With Special Needs in the Inclusive Classroom (3)
This course provides students with an understanding of the major types of learning disabilities. They study current special education law and learn how to interpret and institute an IEP. In addition, they learn how to modify curriculum to accommodate students' learning needs as well as to integrate differentiated instruction into the Understanding by Design framework. (Fieldwork in an inclusive setting required)
MAT 811 - Formerly 811 - Content Area Reading: Adolescent Literacy (3)
This course provides a theoretical understanding of adolescent literacy as well as strategies to enhance comprehension and writing in students' specific content areas. Differentiation of instruction for English Language Learners and Students with Special Needs is addressed.
MAT 812 - Formerly 812 - Historical Inquiry (3)
This course examines cutting edge pedagogy in History education.The focus is on learning to teach with primary source documents, developing classroom oral history projects and teaching secondary students how to create simple historical narratives in the The course is co-taught by a historian and a history educator.
MAT 821 - Formerly 821 - Topics in Biology (3)
Topics include: Cellular and Molecular Biology, Virology, Immunology, Molecular Genetics, Animal Behavior, Biology of the Mind and systems of Nerobiology.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: BIOL+4A OR BIOL+26. To be determined.
MAT 822 - Formerly 822 - Laboratory Methods in Chemistry (3)
This course covers practical and pedagogical topics involved with the preparation and implementation of high school chemistry lab experiments and demonstrations. Through in-lab activities, we will critique, teach and design experiments that expose high school students to the methods (and excitement) of chemistry and engage them in scientific inquiry. Specific topics include the integration of lab activities with the course curriculum, computer interfacing and lab technology, proper lab techniques, preparing for lab activities, safety and environmental considerations and waste disposal, and evaluation of student reports.
Prerequisite: Completion of a chemistry or biochemistry major including general and organic chemistry. Summer second session annually.
MAT 823 - Formerly 823 - High School Mathematics From an Advanced Perspective (3)
In this course, students revisit high school mathematics from an advanced perspective. Attention is given to theoretical foundations, the interrelatedness of topics, generalizations and abstractions, multiple perspectives (for example, geometric and algebraic; functional and set-theoretical), and the use of technology to explore and demonstrate mathematical ideas.
MAT 824 - Formerly 824 - Hispanic Humanties Seminar (Seminario en Humanidades His) (3)
n advanced seminar on a topic relating to the language, culture, and/or literature of the Hispanic world. Emphasis on research and critical thinking.
Spring Semester. Same as: SPAN+180
MAT 831 - Formerly 831 - Biology of the Mind (3)
An introduction to the biological basis for the mental processes by which we think, perceive, learn, and remember. General topics include anatomical organization of brain function, how cells in the brain communicate with each other, and the interplay between nature versus nurture in neural development. Does not meet requirements for major or minor in biology.
Meets: Four hours of class. Annually.
MAT 832 - Formerly 832 - Systems Neurobiology (3)
The neurons of the nervous system are organized into systems that can be defined on the basis of function, anatomy or neurochemistry. This course explores the development of these systems, coordination of the activity within each system, and clinical disorders arising from malfunctions. The laboratory uses current neuroanatomical, pharmacological and neurochemical techniques to explore structure and function.
Meets: Three hours of class and Three hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+9 and BIOL+22 and CHEM+6 and CHEM+7
MAT 834 - Formerly 834 - Vertebrate Morphogenesis (3)
Vertebrate anatomy and embryology integrated into a single sequence relating adult morphology to embryological development and adaptation. Stresses basic principles of vertebrate organization, functional considerations of morphology, homologies among vertebrate structures, and evolutionary relations of vertebrate groups. Laboratory work includes comparative studies of various vertebrate types and field trips to the Bronx Zoo and American Museum of Natural History. Fulfills laboratory requirement for major.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and BIOL+9
MAT 835 - Formerly 835 - Immunology (3)
An introduction to the principles of immunology. Stresses the nature of antigens, antibodies, and antigen-antibody interactions; humoral and cellular immune responses governing antibody production, hypersensitivities, transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, and neoplasia. Includes discussions on immunogenetics, immunoregulation, and the concept of immune networks.
Meets: Three hours class. Prerequisite: BIOL+7 and BIOL+9 and BIOL+22 and CHEM+25
MAT 837 - Formerly 837 - Topics in Neurosciences: (3)
An in depth study in subjects related to neurosciences for students in the Master of Arts and Teaching program. Topics are announced at the time of registration and could focus on any area of neurosciences.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 839 - Formerly 839 - Selected Topics in Biology: (3)
An in depth study in subjects related to biology for students in the Master of Arts and Teaching program. Topics are announced at the time of registration and could focus on any area of biology.
MAT 840 - Formerly 840 - Selected Topics in Physics (3)
Occasional elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to physics. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Prerequisite: Varies with topic; consult course listings, or contact the program dir. To be determined.
MAT 841 - Formerly 841 - Physical Chemistry I (3)
A study of the basic principles of quantum mechanics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and structure. Topics include quantum mechanics of translation, vibration, and rotation, application of quantum mechanics to atomic spectra and atomic structure, molecular orbital theory of diatomics and conjugated polyatomics, electronic spectroscopy of diatomics and conjugate systems, vibrational spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elementary nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory experiments emphasize the use of the above mentioned spectroscopies in the determination of molecular structure.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM+26 and MATH+8 and PHYS+12
MAT 841L - Formerly 841L - TOPICS IN BIOLOGY LAB
Required topics in Biology Lab.
MAT 842 - Formerly 842 - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (3)
A systematic study of modern inorganic chemistry beginning with the chemistry of the main group elements. Topics include periodic trends and chemical relationships and unusual bonding interactions. Focuses on the chemistry of the transition elements, including stereochemistry and isomerism, bonding (crystal and ligand field theory), magnetic and spectroscopic properties, metal-metal bonds, metal clusters, organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry.
Meets: Three hours class. Prerequisite: CHEM+25 Fall semester.
MAT 843 - Formerly 843 - Biochemistry (3)
A study of the fundamental principles of protein biochemistry with an introduction to metabolism. Topics include chemistry of amino acids, relationship between protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, regulation of enzymatic activity. The laboratory focuses on the application of biochemical principles to the solving of biological problems in living systems. Laboratory experimental methods include protein and nucleic acid characterization, purification of enzymes, enzyme kinetic measurements, and forensic biochemistry.
Meets: Three hours class, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM+26 Corequisite: CHEM+118. Fall semester.
MAT 844 - Formerly 844 - Biochemistry Lab (1)
Basic techniques of experimental biochemistry including spectrophotometric and chromatographic techniques. Projections will include protein quantitation enzyme assay, dipeptide sequencing, characterization of a simple sugar.
Meets: Three hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: MAT+843 Same as: CHEM+118
MAT 845 - Formerly 845 - Special Topics in Environmental Science (3)
Occasional elective courses interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment.
MAT 846 - Formerly 846 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (3)
Occasional elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Prerequisite: Varies with topic; consult course listings, or contact the program dir. To be determined.
MAT 847 - Formerly 847 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (3)
Occasional advanced elective courses on interdisciplinary or disciplinary topics related to the environment. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 848 - Formerly 848 - Modern Physics (3)
A descriptive and mathematical introduction to topics in contemporary physics. Topics include special relativity, early quantum theory, the Schroedinger equation and its applications, and additional selected topics from general relativity, atomic, nuclear, solid state, and elementary particle physics.
Prerequisite: PHYS+11, 12 AND MATH+8. Offered fall semester. Same as: PHYS+103
MAT 848R - Formerly 848R - MODERN PHYSICS RECITATION
Required recitation for MAT+848.
MAT 849 - Formerly 849 - Topics in Chemistry: (3)
Topics include: Physical Chemistry ll, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 850 - Formerly 850 - Topics in Physics: (3)
An in depth study in subjects related to physics for students in the Master of Arts and Teaching program. Topics are announced at the time of registration and could focus on any area of physics.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 855 - Formerly 851 - Topics in English: (3)
Topics include: Holocaust Theatre: Resistance, Response, Remembrance, The Literature of Addictions, The Journey Back to Self.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 858 - Formerly 858 - Topics in Theatre Arts (3)
An in depth study in theatre related subjects for students in the Master of Arts and Teaching program. Topics are announced at the time of registration and could focus on any area of the theatre.
MAT 861 - Formerly 861 - Introductory Statistics (3)
Presentation and interpretation of data, frequency distributions, measures of center and dispersion, elementary probability, inference and sampling, regression and correlation; use of a standard statistics software product. Designed for students in the social and biological sciences.
Meets: 150 minutes weekly, with an additional 50 minute recitation. Every semester. Same as: MATH+3
MAT 862 - Formerly 862 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (3)
Mathematical topics central to the study of computer science: elementary logic and set theory, modular arithmetic, proof techniques, induction, recurrences, counting, generating functions, graph theory, matrices, Gaussian elimination.
Meets: Weekly for three 65 minute periods. Fall semester. Same as: MATH+23
MAT 863 - Formerly 863 - Number Theory (3)
A mathematical investigation of the integers: prime numbers, unique factorization, congruence, theorems of Fermat and Euler, quadratic reciprocity, Diophantine equations, applications in cryptography and coding theory.
Meets: 150 minutes weekly. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH+17 Same as: MATH+108
MAT 864 - Formerly 864 - Mathematical Physics (3)
An introduction to methods used in solving problems in physics and other sciences. Calculus of variations and extremum principles. Orthogonal functions and Sturm-Liouville problems. Fourier series. Series solutions of differential equations. The partial differential equations of physics. Transform and Green's function methods of solution. Nonlinear equations and chaos theory.
Prerequisite: MATH+104 and PHYS+11
MAT 865 - Formerly 865 - Real and Complex Analysis (3)
Topics include properties of the real and complex number systems, introduction to point set typology, limits of sequences and functions, continuity, differentiation and integration of real and complex functions, and infinite series and uniform convergence.
Meets: Weekly for three 65 minute periods. Prerequisite: MATH+17 and MATH+100
MAT 866 - Formerly 866 - Probability (3)
The fundamentals of probability theory including discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, conditional probability and independence, joint probability distributions, expected values, moment generating functions, laws of large numbers, and limit theorems. Special topics selected from random walks, Markov chains, and applications as time permits.
Meets: Weekly for three 65 minute periods. Prerequisite: MATH+17 and MATH+100 Same as: MATH+129
MAT 867 - Formerly 867 - Topics in Mathematics: (3)
Topics include: Foundations of Higher Mathematics, Linear Algebra, and Mathematics seminar.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 868 - Formerly 868 - Object Oriented Programming (3)
Designing, writing, and testing structured computer programs. Decomposing problems; writing function definitions; conditional and iterative control constructs; using class libraries. Problem-solving through programming with classes and vectors; algorithm correctness; recursion. Java will be the language of instruction.
Meets: Three times weekly for 65 minutes plus once a week for a 75 minute laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in CSCI+1. Same as: CSCI+2
MAT 869 - Formerly 869 - Topics in Computer Sciences: (3)
An in depth study in subjects related to computer sciences for students in the Master of Arts and Teaching program. Topics are announced at the time of registration and could focus on any area of computer sciences.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 871 - Formerly 871 - Topics in History: (3)
Topics include: The Age of Revolutions, c 1688-1917, Studies in British History: The empire Strikes Back: the struggles for Independence from the British Empire, with special reference to China, India and Ireland, Abe Lincoln: Man, Myth and Memory, 1848: The Springtime of the People.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 872 - Formerly 872 - Topics in French: (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
MAT 873 - Formerly 873 - Topics in Italian: (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
MAT 881 - Formerly 881 - Selected Topics in Spanish: (3)
Topics include :Environmental Representations: Nature, Nation and Self in Spanish America, Linguistics, Intercambios Translanticos: Una Historia cultural de la comida de los siglos 16 al 21, Literature of the Conquest of Latin America, Spanish Grammar in Action.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 882 - Formerly 882 - Literature of the Conquest of Latin America (3)
A study of the artistic, intellectual, and social aspects that distinguish the various Spanish-speaking groups in the United States. The course surveys Spain's cultural presence in North America from the early 16th century to the mid-19th century through the works of early explorers, oral narratives, and the role of the missions. In addition, the concept of traditional and contemporary borderlands and its geographic and psycholinguistic implications are explored to analyze issues of marginality, bilingual-bicultural issues, and nationalism. Primary emphasis is on contemporary authors and trends.
Spring semester. Same as: SPAN+136
MAT 883 - Formerly 883 - History, Society, Fiction in the Lit.of Mexico & Hisp.Car (3)
This course studies one of the major contemporary narrative genres in Latin America, the "cuento fantastico," which includes the much popularized notion of magical realism.
Same as: SPAN+146
MAT 884 - Formerly 884 - Spanish Grammar in Action (3)
No description is available for this course. Same as: SPAN+126
MAT 885A - Formerly 885A - Spanish Composition I (1)
This course provides a grammar review with special attention to the development of accurate oral and written expression. The objective of this course is to improve written proficiency. Emphasis on acquiring expressive vocabulary and knowing the rhetorical norms of different writing styles: academic writing, formal and informal correspondence, creative, argumentative, etc. Through daily written assignments, including exercises in translation, students should increase control of writing across various contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN+102, placement, or special permission.
MAT 885B - Formerly 885B - Spanish Composition II (1)
A continuation of Spanish Composition I. This course provides a grammar review with special attention to the development of accurate oral and written expression. The objective of this course is to improve written proficiency. Emphasis on acquiring expressive vocabulary and knowing the rhetorical norms of different writing styles: academic writing, formal and informal correspondence, creative, argumentative, etc. Through daily written assignments, including exercises in translation, students should increase control of writing across various contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN+102, or special permission.
MAT 896 - Formerly 896 - Special Topics in Teaching: (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
Course may be repeated.
MAT 900 - Formerly 900 - Student Teaching Internship and Seminar (6)
Students spend a full semester student teaching. They are enrolled concurrently in a student teaching seminar in which they study classroom management theory and practice; learn interviewing strategies and to write resume and cover letters; and complete a professional portfolio.
MAT 905 - Formerly 905 - Masters of Arts and Teaching Tutorial (3)
This course is an independent study between a student and a faculty member, with a topic mutually agreed upon. Requires faculty and dean's approval.
May be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.

MDHM - Formerly MEDHM

MDHM 101 - Formerly MEDHM 101 - Biomedical Ethics (3)
An examination of major medical care issues facing the discipline. Includes discussion of ethical and religious concerns involving abortion, death and dying, and human experimentation.
MDHM 102 - Formerly MEDHM 102 - Medical Narrative (3)
This course will investigate the scope of narrative approaches to medical knowledge (narratives of illness, narrative as ethical discourse, narrative as an essential part of clinical work). It will introduce the student to varieties of medical narrative (anecdote, medical history, case presentation). The course will also explore narrative and interpretive techniques that may enhance communication between patient and physician and within the medical community as a whole.
MDHM 103 - Formerly MEDHM 103 - Advanced Studies in Biomedical Ethics (3)
Addresses specific topics in bioethics, focusing in-depth on issues raised in MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+101. Topics include: Life and Death Issues; Medical Technology.
Prerequisite: MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+101
MDHM 104 - Formerly MEDHM 104 - Advanced Studies in Medical Narrative (3)
Topics include: The Literature of Addiction.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 105 - Formerly MEDHM 105 - Humanism and The Humanities (3)
This course provides an historical and conceptual overview of Western humanism and its evolution into the humanities disciplines. A main goal is to introduce students to central themes in humanistic thought, western humanism and its primary sources from antiquity, the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. The relations between the varieties of humanism and medicine and the modern split between scientific medicine and humanistic thought will be discussed. The class will also explore whether American society possesses any shared values on which to build a unified community that could frame the historical exploration of humanism and an approach to the medical humanities. A key outcome of the course will be to define medical humanities.
MDHM 200 - Formerly MEDHM 200 - Cultural History of Medicine (3)
Starting with evidences of caring in lower animals, the story of medicine is traced from pre-history to the present. The theories of causation and the therapies designed to counteract disease and suffering are related to the epochs in which they make their appearances.
Same as: MLIT+503
MDHM 201 - Formerly MEDHM 201 - Medical Biography (3)
Topics include: Giovanni Battista Morgagni.
MDHM 202 - Formerly MEDHM 202 - Plagues in History (3)
An examination of the relationship between the human population and the micro- and macro-parasites that interact with it. The nature of the ecological balance between people and their diseases is discussed, as well as the effects of both endemic and epidemic disease on history.
Same as: MLIT+523
MDHM 204 - Formerly MEDHM 204 - History of Scientific Medicine (3)
The science-based medicine of our time may not be the only medicine, but it is the one on which most of us rely. It affects our lives in countless ways, and an appreciation of its historical development is warranted. This course deals with the great scientific discoveries that made modern medicine possible. It tracecs the growth of anatomy, surgery, physiology and pathology in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, and examines more fully the extraordinary expansion and proliferation of medical sciences in the 19th and 20th centuries.
MDHM 205 - Formerly MEDHM 205 - Topics in the History of Medicine: (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
MDHM 222 - Formerly MEDHM 222 - Topics in the History of Science and Medicine (3)
Topics include Secret of Life: History of Genetics in the 20th Century. Addotional topics will be announced at registration.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 301 - Formerly MEDHM 301 - Literature and Medicine (3)
Examines the role of medicine, caregivers, and illness in fiction and nonfiction. Topics include: contemporary ethical issues in American literature; The Literary Response to HIV/AIDS; Literary Art and The Medical Mind.
Course may be repeated. Same as: MLIT+328
MDHM 304 - Formerly MEDHM 304 - Writing Practicum (3)
Explores the intersection between medicine and the act/art of writing. Topics include: Writing to Heal.
MDHM 305 - Formerly MEDHM 305 - Marriage and the Family (3)
Considers the impact of marriage decisions and structures on medical concerns. Topics include: marriage and family counseling; family structures and medical ethics; family dynamics.
MDHM 306 - Formerly MEDHM 306 - The Role of the Family in the Early Development of Object Permanence and Nonexistence (3)
The hypothesis of this course is that the rich, early literature depicted in children's games, fairy tales, rhymes and stories is the preparatory stage in the development of an adult understanding of our own nonexistence. For example, the game peekaboo (one of the first games played by a child with its parents) becomes one of the earliest building blocks upon which more sophisticated and in-depth notions of life and death may be built. The course will increase the student's awareness of the importance of this category throughout the life cycle of the human person, culminating in one's own nonexistence. The literature of separation loss, object permanency disappearance is extensive and cross-disciplinary. Includes an examination of the works of Bettelheim, Bowlby, and Kubler-Ross.
MDHM 310 - Formerly MEDHM 310 - Psychohistory-Psycobiography (3)
he emotional development and psychological issues of significant historical figures will be examined. How did the family life and early childhood and adolescence shape the future political and personal behavior of certain major political figures. We will examine the inner life, through their behavior, or Ghandi, Luther, Hitler, Woodrow Wilson, Sadam Hussein, and our last four presidents. Their adult presentation will be examined as a function of both their childhood and family dynamic.
MDHM 328 - Formerly MEDHM 328 - Alcoholism & Gender: A Literary Analysis (3)
Topics vary and are announced at registration.
MDHM 401 - Formerly MEDHM 401 - Clinical Ethics (3)
A study of the application of biomedical principles in the clinical arena, situations that require assessment of competing principles, and the process of resolution when differences in ethical judgments make consensus difficult. Among the topics to be considered are: the bioethics committee; end-of-life decisions, including Do Not Resuscitate Orders and Advance Directives; confidentiality, communication issues; just distribution of scarce resources and clinical decision-making within cost constraints.
MDHM 410 - Formerly MEDHM 410 - The Pharmaceutical Industry (3)
This seminar will examine the growth of the Pharmaceutical Industry from its early beginnings to its present role as a multi-national, multi-billion-dollar industry. The course will introduce students to the drug discovery and development process from inception to market. Selected readings and discussions will analyze the following: inequalities that emerge from and are reinforced by market-driven medicine, the responsibilities of drug developers to health care and general wellness on a global scale and the controversial role pharmaceutical marketing and promotion play in enabling the flow of information that is quite difficult to convey to patients and doctors.
MDHM 500 - Formerly MEDHM 500 - Studies in Psychoanalysis (3)
Addresses the intersection between psychoanalysis and medical humanities. Topics include: Psychoanalytic dynamics of group roles and effective group leadership; psychoanalysis and human sexuality; Freud's dream realized: from metascience to neurobiology and beyond.
Course may be repeated. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+326 RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+794
MDHM 501 - Formerly MEDHM 501 - Psychopathology and Contemporary Life (3)
This course focuses on mastering the "Sea of Storms"--on the moon or in ourselves. With our expanding perspective of ourselves as an interdependent community of astronauts has come an expansion of our perspective of abnormal behavior. We now see it as encompassing behavior not only of individuals but also of families and larger groups, including entire societies. We explore maladaptive behavior such as neuroses, schizophrenia, and drug dependence.
MDHM 502 - Formerly MEDHM 502 - Medical Humanities and the Caregiver (3)
Explores the humanistic challenges facing modern caregivers. Topics include: approaches to wellness; coping.
Same as: MLIT+521
MDHM 503 - Formerly MEDHM 503 - Maturation: From Birth to Age 3 (3)
An experiential group seminar designed to explore an understanding of the group processes and the repertoire of techniques for working well with groups while exploring the theories, developmental stages, conflicts, and feelings associated with the maturation stage.
MDHM 510 - Formerly MEDHM 510 - Spirituality and Medicine (3)
Explores the intersection between faith and the medical arts. Topics include: Spirituality and Psychoanalysis.
MDHM 515 - Formerly MEDHM 515 - Contemporary Medicine and Culture (3)
Investigates the impact of contemporary societal influences and medicine. Topics include: Science, Medicine, and Faith.
Course may be repeated. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+515
MDHM 516 - Formerly MEDHM 516 - Hospital Governance (3)
Boards of Trustees have major responsibilities to provide effective leadership for nonprofit healthcare organizations. They must serve all stakeholders affiliated with the institution(s), both internal and external. When the organization does well, they are commended. Conversely, when problems arise, trustees are held accountable. Clearly, a variety of difficult and complex problems exists in todays healthcare environment. Consequently, the responsibility of nonprofit hospital trustees requires planning for and addressing the challenges including contentious ethical issues. Conflicts of interest, executive compensation, medical errors, quality of patient care, and allocation of resources are some of the dilemmas that will be considered and debated. Additionally, the students, as trustees will experience significant power and responsibility, commencing with board orientation and culminating as members of a mock board analyzing and debating issues. The expertise of guest speakers from the industry will complement the readings and class discussionsresponsibility
MDHM 529 - Formerly MEDHM 529 - Medicine and Culture (3)
This course provides an international perspective on the interaction between religion, health and culture. Students are introduced to the empirical research on religion and health and various theoretical approaches from cross-cultural psychology and the psychology of religion. Students learn to critically evaluate this literature and develop their own perspective on it.
Course may be repeated. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+529
MDHM 530 - Formerly MEDHM 530 - Medicine and Language (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
MDHM 540 - Formerly MEDHM 540 - Studies in Counseling (2)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
MDHM 541 - Formerly MEDHM 541 - Topics in the Study of Addiction: (3)
This course covers varying issues related to the study of addiction, including such subjects as neurobiology and how drugs of abuse change the brain; exploring the history of addiction studies; and examining the impact of addiction on various populations. Topics include Addiction and Gender; Addiction and Human Behavior; and The Science of Addiction.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 600 - Formerly MEDHM 600 - Film and Medicine (3)
Explores the depiction of medicine and medical practitioners through the medium of film.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 603 - Formerly MEDHM 603 - Studies in Art and Medicine (3)
Topics include: Images of illness and health in visual art.
MDHM 605 - Formerly MEDHM 605 - History of Medical Illustration (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history and theory of scientific illustration, both Western and non-Western and the methods for organizing, developing and producing illustrations capable of conveying a message. The course focuses on three main points: the history of medical illustration; the methods of planning and organizing of scientific illustrations, including research, narration of a process, technique; and field trips. Students need not have artistic ability, but are encouraged to think visually and try out some basic skills to better understand the process of moving from concepts to images.
MDHM 700 - Formerly MEDHM 700 - Illness of Body, Mind, and Spirit (3)
Illness, be it physical, psychical, or spiritual, is defined not by physicians, psychiatrists, or spiritual leaders, but by culture. Its recognition is akin to the process of interpretation in the humanities. This course illustrates and examines these propositions in the reports of patients, physicians, spiritual guides, and literary critics.
MDHM 701 - Formerly MEDHM 701 - Listening to the Symbolic Language of the Body (3)
The body has its own symbolic language. This means a communication from the self to the self often found in illness, ticks, hysterical conversions, muscle tightness, backaches, headaches, etc. The body often focuses the internal message, suppressed to the self by the psyche or the intellect. Various writers have attempted to understand this process for the sake of unraveling the meaning of illness. This course integrates a number of medical, spiritual, and psychological points of view. The course investigates the body-mind-spirit connection by turning to writers like Alexander Lowen, Daniel Goleman, Jon Kabat-Zinn, and Aame Siirala.
MDHM 705 - Formerly MEDHM 705 - Philosophical Implications in Science and Medicine (3)
The intersection of medicine and science reflects culture, politics, and faith. Does it also intersect with two thousand years of Western philosophy? Or is the utopian Dream of a Theory of Everything epistemological jargon: The fragility of such an ambitious but ethereal theory encompasses a continuum of ideas traced from the era of Greek sages to the present postmodern times. To understand this enduring wisdom, the course presents diverse doctrine supporting the consilience of philosophy, science and the medical humanities. With this approach, we explore origins perceived by the minds and movements in the long history of ieas. The series of seminars emphasizes the correlation between classical studies and empiricism, encouraging scholars to probe thoughts and theories of established philosophies. However, beyond what is provided by an inquiring mind, participants are not required or expected to have a formal background in philosophy. The seminar features contributions of the Greek Godfathers of thought, Descartes' Dualism, science of the Enlightenment, the challenging philosophy of Darwinism, the intellectual chaos of Freudian upheavals, American Pragmatism, Postmodernism in medicine, Existentialism, Feminism, and Sociobiology. Finally, a fixed Canon of the humanities is proposed to broaden and humanize medical education.
MDHM 706 - Formerly MEDHM 706 - Topics in Theology and Philosophy of Medicine (3)
Topics vary and are announced at the time of registration.
MDHM 800 - Formerly MEDHM 800 - Medical Anthropology (3)
A study of human health from an anthropological (e.g., evolutionary, comparative, and biocultural) perspective. Topics under consideration include evolution of human disease patterns, health and ethnicity, comparison of Western and non-Western systems of medicine, alternative and complementary medicine, the political economy of health, and emerging diseases. This course considers the interplay of culture, biology, and environment in influencing human disease and behavioral response to it.
MDHM 803 - Formerly MEDHM 803 - Medicine and Politics (3)
Investigates the intersection of sociopolitical issues and medical humanities. Topics include: Gender in Medicine; Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; The Future of Biomedical Science.
Same as: MLIT+502
MDHM 804 - Formerly MEDHM 804 - Great Issues in Medicine (3)
A presentation of an in-depth scrutiny of the philosophy and empiricism of medical science by debating these great issues: evolutionary biology and how life began; questions of artificial life and intelligence; the nature of consciousness and whether computers live; genetics and cloning; the pain of the nation over abortion and euthanasia; alternative and experimental techniques; organs donation and transplantation; redefining mental health; and the health care dilemma.
MDHM 805 - Formerly MEDHM 805 - Studies in Human Development (3)
Topics include: Models and Methods of Psychotherapy; Human Development -- A Life Span Approach.
MDHM 806 - Formerly MEDHM 806 - Family Studies (3)
Addresses the dynamics of family relationships as impacted by medical issues. Topics include: Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 810 - Formerly MEDHM 810 - Medicine and Ecology (3)
Addresses the effect that ecology and environmental concerns have on illness and wellness. Topics include: Introduction to ecological medicine.
Course may be repeated. Same as: ARLT - Formerly ARLET+525
MDHM 811 - Formerly MEDHM 811 - Medical Sociology (3)
A study of the important themes, dominant theoretical perspectives, and main methodological approaches involved in the sociological analysis of health care problems and their treatment. Topics include social epidemiology, doctor-patient relationships, professional socialization, different health-care delivery mechanisms, and the social psychological consequences of medical technology.
MDHM 812 - Formerly MEDHM 812 - Medical Transgressions (3)
No description is available for this course.
MDHM 813 - Formerly MEDHM 813 - Disease and Society: Past and Future Pandemics (3)
No description is available for this course.
MDHM 814 - Formerly MEDHM 814 - Gender and Medicine (3)
Topics include Gender and Science, and are announced at the time of registration.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 815 - Formerly MEDHM 815 - The Politics of Public Health (3)
The course is an examination of current public health issues from the perspectives of critical medical anthropology and political ecology. Public health involves taking a population-based approach to health problems with a strong focus on ethical principles and issues of social justice both locally and globally. Within this framework, students analyze a number of problems and policy issues, some provided by the instructor and others that students themselves bring in from recent newspaper or other media sources. Topics may include health hazards of modern food production, behavioral intervention and the rise of obesity and diabetes, national healthcare vs. private insurance, vulnerable populations (e.g., the poor and the elderly), global health issues, disaster management, and rationing health care and vaccines. Analysis of these problems includes evaluating the quality of health information in the mass media and considering how health policy, law, and ethics handle tensions between individual rights and social responsibility. In addition to finding and studying these issues, students complete a research paper in a related area of their choice.
MDHM 817 - Formerly MEDHM 817 - Naturalistic Inquiry (3)
Naturalistic inquiry, a form of ethnography, is a qualitative research methodology as opposed to the hypothetico-deductive methodology prevalent in the exact sciences of today. The primary research instrument is the interviewer. Basic techniques include in-depth interviewing and prolonged observation within the natural setting of a group. The interviews and observations are recorded in a "thick description," which stays close to the actual experience and avoids theory-laden language. This course will provide instruction in the techniques of naturalistic inquiry for designing the study collecting and analyzing data, validating the results, and writing up a case report. This is a hands-on course where each student will be required to conduct a naturalistic inquiry of his or her own. Ideally, the topic would relate to the student's ultimate thesis or dissertation topic. The course will also provide instruction in using computerized tools to assist in data analysis.
MDHM 818 - Formerly MEDHM 818 - Pertinent Issues in Medical Humanities and Science (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
MDHM 819 - Formerly MEDHM 819 - Topics in Forensic Medicine: (3)
three module course sequence on issues in Forensic Medicine. Forensic Medicine I "The Legal Foundation of American Health Care" will include discussions of major court decisions as well as the laws that shape the practice of medicine in the areas of: professionalization, structure of hospital-based and doctor-based delivery systems, concepts of health insurance and more. Forensic Medicine II "Evolution of American Health Ethics" will focus on the evolution of the legal directives guiding ethical behavior as societies become more complex. Topics in Forensic II will include the rationale and goals of criminal law, civil remedies, and political systems. Forensic III "Medical Transgressions" presents the application of the principles in the Foundation and Evolution segments in dealing with deviations from the standards of care.
Each of the three modules of Forensic Medicine may be taken separately and independently of the others, and without required prerequisites. Modules offered are announced at the time of registration. Course may be repeated. Recommended: Familiarity with the history of western civilization - such as is discussed in survey courses in western history is advisable.
MDHM 820 - Formerly MEDHM 820 - Medical Humanities in the Clinical Setting (3)
Topics include: Putting the Humanities to Work for the Clinician
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 851 - Formerly MEDHM 851 - Introduction to the History and Historigraphy of Disabilit y (3)
An exploration of ideas about disability, humanity and human difference in Europe and the United States. After a brief survey of disability from ancient times to the Enlightenment in the Old World, we will examine the colonial period in America, when disabled persons faced a mixture of suspicion and acceptance in small and isolated communities, followed by a discussion attitudes and practices in the nineteenth century, when disabled persons confronted isolation and institutionalization arising in part from industrialization, and continue with the early twentieth-century nightmares of eugenic hysteria and sterilization, which grew in part out of distortions of Enlightenment ideas of statistical norms and progress. We will conclude with a brief introduction to the disability rights movement of the last generation.
MDHM 852 - Formerly MEDHM 852 - Topics in the Study of Disability (3)
Courses will explore key issues in the medical, social, legal, political and psychological aspects of disability. Topics will include the history and historiography of disability.
MDHM 900 - Formerly MEDHM 900 - Clinical Practicum (3)
Times to be arranged in consultation with the director. Supervised schedule of clinical instruction involving the Bioethics Committee, clinic and emergency room observation, Ethics Conference, grand rounds, Humanities Conference, ICU/CCU rounds, Morbidity and Mortality Conference, Narrative Conference, nursing home visitation, and teaching rounds. Submission of a written journal required. The practicum can be geared towards student interests, and takes into account prior experience (if applicable).
Prerequisite: MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+101 and 102.
MDHM 900A - Formerly MEDHM 900A - Clinical Practicum: Overlook Hospital (3)
Times to be arranged in consultation with the director. Supervised schedule of clinical instruction involving the Bioethics Committee, clinic and emergency room observation, Ethics Conference, grand rounds, Humanities Conference, ICU/CCU rounds, Morbidity and Mortality Conference, Narrative Conference, Palliative Care, nursing home visitation, and teaching rounds. Submission of a written journal required. The practicum can be geared towards student interests, and takes into account prior experience (if applicable).
Prerequisite: MEDHM+101
MDHM 900B - Formerly MEDHM 900B - Clinical Practicum: St.Barnabas Hospital (3)
Times to be arranged in consultation with the director. Supervised schedule of clinical instruction involving the Bioethics Committee, clinic and emergency room observation, Ethics Conference, grand rounds, Humanities Conference, ICU/CCU rounds, Morbidity and Mortality Conference, Narrative Conference, nursing home visitation, and teaching rounds. Submission of a written journal required. The practicum can be geared towards student interests, and takes into account prior experience (if applicable).
Prerequisite: MEDHM+101
MDHM 901 - Formerly MEDHM 901 - Tutorial (3)
Members of the Medical Humanities Faculty. Available in autumn and spring terms annually. Open only to D.M.H. candidates interested in doing a tutorial ith Drew-based faculty. Any doctoral student interested in registering for a tutorial must file a petition; forms are available in the Dean's Office. Arraignments must be made with the tutorial director and Program Director prior to filing petition. A student may only register for MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+901 or MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+903 twice.
Course may be repeated.
MDHM 902 - Formerly MEDHM 902 - Advanced Medical Humanities: Raritan Bay (15)
This course is the three-year humanities program required as part of the residency requirements at Raritan Bay Medical Center for residents in Internal Medicine. Taught on site at Raritan Bay Medical Center. Open only to residents in the Internal Medicine Residency Program.
MDHM 903 - Formerly MEDHM 903 - Clinical Tutorial (3)
Members of the Clinical Faculty. Available in autumn and spring terms annually. Open only to D.M.H. candidates interested in doing a tutorial on site at Raritan Bay Medical Center. Any doctoral student interested in registering for a tutorial must file a petition; forms are available in Dean's Office. Arrangements must be made with the tutorial director and Program Director prior to filing petition. A student may only register for MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+901 OR MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+903 twice.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
MDHM 904 - Formerly MEDHM 904 - Advanced Medical Humanities: Overlook/Atlantic HealthCare (15)
This course is the three-year humanities program offered as part of the residency requirements at Overlook and Morristown Memorial Hospitals for residents in Internal Medicine, and for other healthcare professionals at the two hospitals. Taught on site at the hospitals.
Open only to residents in the Internal Medicine Residency Program and other healthcare professionals employed by Atlantic Healthcare.
MDHM 905 - Formerly MEDHM 905 - WRITING PRACTICUM (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated.
MDHM 906 - Formerly MEDHM 906 - Advanced Medical Humanities: Saint Barnabas Hospital (15)
This course is the three-year humanities program offered as part of the residency requirements at St. Barnabas Hospital for residents in Internal Medicine, and for other healthcare professionals at the hospitals. Taught on site at the hospital.
Open only to residents in the Internal Medicine Residency Program and other healthcare professionals employed by St. Barnabas.
MDHM 908 - Formerly MEDHM 908 - Advanced Practicum - Medical Humanities Field Study (3)
In this course Drew students will work with faculty and medical professionals on projects designed to bring the Medical Humanities to practitioners in the field. Projects might include programs like Drew students participating as a team with faculty advisors to develop, using ACCME guildlines, a one-hour CME accreditied Presentation on Medical Humanities for presentation to 40 Primary Care Physicians and staff in their offices.
Prerequisite: Completion of 18 credits in the Medical Humanities Program, including MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+101, Biomedical Ethics and MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+102, Medical Narrative. Completion of MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+900 Clinical Practicum is preferred but not required.
MDHM 990 - Formerly MEDHM 990 - Master's Thesis Preparation (3)
Times to be arranged in consultation with the director. Supervised clinical study leading to preparation of the master's thesis. The directed study is geared towards student interests and builds upon the previous clinical practicum experience. This course is open only to master's degree candidates preparing to begin their thesis research.
Prerequisite: (MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+900 or MDHM - Formerly MDHM - Formerly MEDHM+900B)
MDHM 999 - Formerly MEDHM 999 - Dissertation (9)
No description is available for this course.

MFA

MFA 800 - Formerly 800 - Poetry Workshop I (3)
At the residency the student will attend six poetry workshops. Each workshop will be comprised of 4-5 students and one faculty poet. The student is required to submit 4-5 poems for the Residency Anthology prior to the residency. During each two hour workshop one poem by every student will be discussed by the mentor and by fellow students. The workshop may include writing exercises. Two of the required workshops may include being assigned to the New Work Workshop in which each student will start new work under the guidance and prompting of the faculty.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 801 - Formerly 801 - Translation Workshop I (3)
Student attends 6 translation workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 803 - Formerly 803 - Poetry & Translation Workshop I (3)
Student attends 4 poetry workshops and 2 translation workshops.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 804 - Formerly 804 - Craft Seminar & Residency Essay I (4)
It is required that each student attend all the lectures as well as all the readings at the residency. These lectures will be on various topics, such as craft issues, particular poets or movements, and translation. Craft issues are wide ranging and include use of music, meter, rhyme, voice, diction, forms, etc. Shortly after the residency each student will be required to turn in a residency essay. This essay should be an engaged response to three of the lectures, one workshop, and one reading, and should discuss things learned as well as topics the student would like to follow up on.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 805 - Formerly 805 - Poetry Writing I (5)
Student sents approximately 16-20 poems over the course of the semester to mentor for critique.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 806 - Formerly 806 - Poetry in Translation I (5)
Student sends approximately 15-18 translated poems over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 807 - Formerly 807 - Poetry & Poetry in Translation I (5)
Student sends approximately 8-10 poems and 6-10 translated poems over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 808 - Formerly 808 - Critical Writing & Reading I (4)
During the mentorship semester each student will have a list of 20-25 books to read that will include poetry and essays on poetry. The student will be expected to write two short papers (3-4 pages) for each packet. The student will also respond to the reading in a letter to the mentor included in each packet.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 810 - Formerly 810 - Poetry Workshop II (3)
At the residency the student will attend six poetry workshops. Each workshop will be comprised of 4-5 students and one faculty poet. The student is required to submit 4-5 poems for the Residency Anthology prior to the residency. During each two hour workshop one poem by every student will be discussed by the mentor and by fellow students. The workshop may include writing exercises. Two of the required workshops may include being assigned to the New Work Workshop in which each student will start new work under the guidance and prompting of the faculty.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 811 - Formerly 811 - Translation Workshop II (3)
student attends 6 translation workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 812 - Formerly 812 - Poetry in Translation Workshop II (3)
student attends 3 poetry workshops and 3 translation workshops.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 814 - Formerly 814 - Craft Seminar & Residency Essay II (4)
It is required that each student attend all the lectures as well as all the readings at the residency. These lectures will be on various topics, such as craft issues, particular poets or movements, and translation. Craft issues are wide ranging and include use of music, meter, rhyme, voice, diction, forms, etc. Shortly after the residency each student will be required to turn in a residency essay. This essay should be an engaged response to three of the lectures, one workshop, and one reading, and should discuss things learned as well as topics the student would like to follow up on.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 815 - Formerly 815 - Poetry Writing II (5)
During the mentorship semester each student will be writing original poems as well as working on revisions of poems. A minimum of 4 poems and 2-3 revisions will be included in every packet sent to the student's mentor.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 816 - Formerly 816 - Poetry in Translation II (5)
Student sends approximately 15-18 translations over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 817 - Formerly 817 - Poetry & Poetry in Translation II (5)
Student sends approximately 8-10 poems and 6-10 translated poems over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 818 - Formerly 818 - Critical Writing & Reading II (4)
During the mentorship semester each student will have a list of 20-25 books to read that will include poetry and essays on poetry. The student will be expected to write two short papers (3-4 pages) for each packet. The student will also respond to the reading in a letter to the mentor included in each packet.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 819 - Formerly 819 - Poetry Workshop III (3)
At the residency the student will attend six poetry workshops. Each workshop will be comprised of 4-5 students and one faculty poet. The student is required to submit 4-5 poems for the Residency Anthology prior to the residency. During each two hour workshop one poem by every student will be discussed by the mentor and by fellow students. The workshop may include writing exercises. Two of the required workshops may include being assigned to the New Work Workshop in which each student will start new work under the guidance and prompting of the faculty.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 820 - Formerly 820 - Translation Workshop III (3)
student attends 6 translation workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 821 - Formerly 821 - Poetry & Translation Workshop III (3)
student attends 3 poetry workshops and 3 translation workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 822 - Formerly 822 - Craft Seminar & Residency Essay III (4)
It is required that each student attend all the lectures as well as all the readings at the residency. These lectures will be on various topics, such as craft issues, particular poets or movements, and translation. Craft issues are wide ranging and include use of music, meter, rhyme, voice, diction, forms, etc. Shortly after the residency each student will be required to turn in a residency essay. This essay should be an engaged response to three of the lectures, one workshop, and one reading, and should discuss things learned as well as topics the student would like to follow up on.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 823 - Formerly 823 - Poetry Writing III (5)
During the mentorship semester each student will be writing original poems as well as working on revisions of poems. A minimum of 4 poems and 2-3 revisions will be included in every packet sent to the student's mentor.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 824 - Formerly 824 - Poetry in Translation III (5)
Student sends approximately 15-18 poems over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 825 - Formerly 825 - Poetry & Poetry in Translation III (5)
Student sends approximately 8-10 poems and 6-10 translations over the course of the semester to mentor for critique
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 826 - Formerly 826 - Critical Writing & Reading III (4)
During the mentorship semester each student will have a list of 20-25 books to read that will include poetry and essays on poetry. The student will be expected to write two short papers (3-4 pages) for each packet. The student will also respond to the reading in a letter to the mentor included in each packet.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 827 - Formerly 827 - Poetry Workshop IV (3)
At the residency the student will attend six poetry workshops. Each workshop will be comprised of 4-5 students and one faculty poet. The student is required to submit 4-5 poems for the Residency Anthology prior to the residency. During each two hour workshop one poem by every student will be discussed by the mentor and by fellow students. The workshop may include writing exercises. Two of the required workshops may include being assigned to the New Work Workshop in which each student will start new work under the guidance and prompting of the faculty.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 828 - Formerly 828 - Translation Workshop IV (3)
student attends 6 poetry workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 829 - Formerly 829 - Poetry & Translation Workshop IV (3)
student attends 4 poetry and 2 translation workshops
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 830 - Formerly 830 - Craft Seminar & Reading IV (4)
It is required that each student attend all the lectures as well as all the readings at the residency. These lectures will be on various topics, such as craft issues, particular poets or movements, and translation. Craft issues are wide ranging and include use of music, meter, rhyme, voice, diction, forms, etc. Shortly after the residency each student will be required to turn in a residency essay. This essay should be an engaged response to three of the lectures, one workshop, and one reading, and should discuss things learned as well as topics the student would like to follow up on.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 831 - Formerly 831 - Poetry Manuscript (5)
During the final mentorship semester the student will complete a manuscript of original poems (approximately 48 pages) compiled from the four semesters of work.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 832 - Formerly 832 - Poetry in Translation Manuscript (5)
Student completes a manuscript of poems in translation (approximately 35 pages)
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 833 - Formerly 833 - Poetry Manuscript (5)
No description is available for this course.
MFA 834 - Formerly 834 - Critical Writing & Reading IV (4)
During the mentorship semester each student will have a list of 20-25 books to read that will include poetry and essays on poetry. The student will be expected to write two short papers (3-4 pages) for each packet. The student will also respond to the reading in a letter to the mentor included in each packet.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 835 - Formerly 835 - Poetry & Translation Workshop V (3)
Student attends 6 translation workshops.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 836 - Formerly 836 - Craft Seminar & Residency Essay V (4)
Student attends all craft lectures & Poetry readings Student turns in a written journal/essay covering specific events during the residency.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 837 - Formerly 837 - Critical Writing and Reading V (4)
Student reads approximately 20-25 books, writes a publishable book review, prepares for the senior panel and senior reading.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 900 - Formerly 900 - Residency V
Student will give a senior panel presentation and a senior reading.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 901 - Residency V Final Residency Poetry in Translation
Student gives a senior panel presentation and a senior reading.
Graded Pass/Unsatisfactory.
MFA 904 - Formerly 904 - Residency VI (Final Residency and Graduation)
Student gives a senior panel presentation and a senior reading.
MFA MM1F - Formerly MM1F - MAINTAINING MATRICULATION FINAL PROJECT PREP, FT
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
MFA MM2F - Formerly MM2F - MAINTAINING MATRICULATION, TRANSLATION TRACK PREP., FT
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration.

RLSC - Formerly RLSOC

RLSC 700 - Formerly RLSOC 700 - Good Teaching: Learning to Teach Better (3)
No description is available for this course. Same as: EDUC - Formerly EDUCG+700
RLSC 704 - Formerly RLSOC 704 - Autobiography and the Religious Life (3)
A consideration of autobiographical writings, including journals, diaries, essays, and autobiographical novels, with particular attention to stories, accounts, depictions of religious life as pilgrimage, chosen path, visitation, ordeal, and ordinary life. Sources include a wide range of readings, including a consideration of figures of interest to students.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
RLSC 705 - Formerly RLSOC 705 - Introduction to Sociological Method (3)
A critique of a series of studies to understand the fundamental components of the the research process. Looks at studies that illustrate how one develops an appropriate question for study, how one selects a viable method for data collection and for obtaining a sample, and options for data analysis. Intended to give students a framework for evaluating social science research, as well as for guiding the analysis of empirical studies related to a subject that each student may want to pursue for a dissertation.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 701 - Formerly RLSOC 706 - Research Methods (3)
This course is a general introduction to social research methods and research design for the study of religion. It covers four broad topics: 1) the foundations and theories of social science; 2) mixed-methods research design; 3) data collection, analysis, and reporting; 4) ethical implications of social research. Through discussion of these four topics, we will engage issues pertaining to the social scientific study of religion.
RLSC 713 - Formerly RLSOC 713S - The Theory and Practice of Ecosocial Justice (3)
Readings in spiritual, philosophical, feminist, scientific, and socio-political responses around the globe to the ecological crisis. Course has a flexible field-based component designed to involve students in some way in local eco-justice issues.
Disciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 714 - Formerly RLSOC 714 - Strategies of Social Protest (3)
An examination of the lives and social justice leadership choices of the U.S. 1960s civil rights figures, including Martin Luther King, Jr., Septima Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, Malcolm X. Delves into some of the historical circumstances that surrounded these leaders and compares their strategies.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 716 - Formerly RLSOC 716 - Christianity and Ecology (3)
Examines what sociological and theological factors shape various Christian responses to ecological concerns. Surveys some of the historical, philosophical, socio-political, and theological influences that have shaped the current planetary context and looks at the array of contemporary global religious ecological voices and emerging eco-theologies.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: REL+147
RLSC 721 - Formerly RLSOC 721 - Contemporary Ethical Issues (3)
An exploration of contemporary issues, such as sexuality, economics, and globalization; their importance; and the contributions of Christian ethics to understanding and dealing with them.
RLSC 722 - Formerly RLSOC 722 - Hispanic Culture and Religion in the United States (3)
An introduction to the history, culture, economics, and politics of the Hispanic presence in the United States. This course uses other media besides lectures (feature films, novels, and short stories by and about U.S. Hispanics and Latinas/Latino) to stimulate reflection, discussion, and research on its subject matter. This course highlights the religious dimension of the U.S. Latinas/Latino experience.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+476
RLSC 725 - Formerly RLSOC 725 - History of Western Christian Ethics (3)
A study of selected themes and formative figures in Christian ethics, with attention to their contributions to contemporary reflection.
RLSC 728 - Formerly RLSOC 728 - Gay and Lesbian Liberation Theologies in World Religions (3)
This doctoral seminar strives to collectively explore through research, presentations, discussions, films, etc., some of the ways in which emerging lesbian and gay struggles for liberation intersect with the diverse religious traditions present in world Christianity.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 729 - Formerly RLSOC 729 - Feminist Sociology of Religion (3)
An exploration of ways in which a feminist perspective is emerging today in the social-scientific study of religions and the ways in which it might challenge and enrich assumptions about religion. Examines theoretical essays and field-research materials expressing that standpoint within the socio-biology of religions, as well as contibutions emerging from such areas as feminist theologies. The seminar's approach and method attempt to embody traits central to the feminist perspective itself.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 730 - Formerly RLSOC 730 - Religion and Social Change (3)
Selected problems and themes in the sociology of religion regarding issues of religion and social change. For example: religious involvement in social movements, disruptive religion, global Pentecostalism and social change, gender issues, colonialism.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 731 - Formerly RLSOC 731 - Narcissism&Comp:Ind.&Societal Health&Heinz Kohut's Self Psyc (3)
The course examines the psychological understanding of narcissism by surveying the progress of the theory of the psychology of the self developed by Heinz Kohut in conjunction with other theories such as Freudian and Object Relations theories. It engages in a psychological understanding of narcissistic phenomena in a developmental, rather than pathological, perspective. It thus proposes that individual and societal health is achieved by the transformation, and not elimination, of narcissistic behaviors, i.e., the transformation of an immature into a more mature narcissism characterized by creativity, sense of humor, sense of finitude, empathy, and wisdom. It also explores its theoretical implications on the lives of historical figures as well as ethical, pastoral, and theological issues. It works toward developing an ethic/theology of compassion that can address pastoral issues.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+598
RLSC 734 - Formerly RLSOC 734 - Human Development, Prayer, and Psychology (3)
This course will use psychoanalytic, developmental theories, and liberation theology to interpret religious experience. This approach assumes that psychoanalytic theory provides useful insights about how the development of the self is effected by traume, and other extreme social situations. This course will draw upon European-American, and African-American intellectual traditions to understand the interplay of theology and psychology. A primary goal of this course is to prepare students to interpret religious experiences using a variety of psychological perspectives in critical dialogue with theological and ethical traditions.
Interdisciplinary Course.
RLSC 735 - Formerly RLSOC 735 - Personality Theory and Psychopathology (3)
The role of personality theory in the practice of psychology and its usefulness for understanding abnormal religiosity. The perspectives of Freud, Adler, Jung, Allport, Rogers, Oates, Erikson, and others are presented as well as learning models of abnormal behavior.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 738 - Formerly RLSOC 738 - Shame&Grace:A Landscape of Healing&Reconc.in the 21Cent. (3)
This course explores biblical experiences of shame, examines various psychological theories on shame, and works toward constructing a shame-based theology of reconciliation to address the ineffectiveness of the current theology of atonement that are predominantly guilt-oriented. The examination of psychological theories on shame informs the need for a more holistic approach to theology of grace that can complement the weakness of the guilt-based theology of atonement to attend to pervasively shame-based culture in the 21st Century.
Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+638
RLSC 743 - Formerly RLSOC 743 - Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory (3)
A consideration of the basic papers of British psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott to gain an initial literacy in object relations theory; to understand and gain a facility for the metaphorical language of psychoanalytic thought and the metaphorical nature of symbolization theory and the language of the self: the dual and subtle constructions of "self," "other," "God," and "world." Additional papers using object relations theory as a basis for interpretive work are considered from the disciplines of religious studies, literary criticism, feminist thought, anthropology, and music.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 745 - Formerly RLSOC 745 - Selected Thinkers and Themes in Psychology and Religion (3)
An introduction to thinkers and themes in the modern West in psychology and religion, including Freud, Jung, Eliade, James, Tillich, Rubenstein, Gilligan, Lifton, and Daly. Themes include anxiety and courage, faith and identity, symbolic immorality; the psychology of the survivor; feminist consciousness and cultural mourning; theology after the Holocaust.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 747 - Formerly RLSOC 747 - Globalization, Identity, and Hybridity (3)
An examination of some of the major issues in the interrelationship between culture and personality. Interprets cultural roles and their effect on personality by discussing cross-cultural aspects of personality theory. Presents psychodynamic theories and social-systems viewpoints as the basis for integrating social-psychological concepts of person/situation interaction.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 749 - Formerly RLSOC 749 - Sexual Ethics (3)
This course will introduce students to a range of approaches to sexual ethics by Christian social ethicists as well as contemporary debates about morality. It will emphasize the interplay between issues of race/ethnicity and sexuality in public moral discourse. Topics will include: heterosexuality, "queer" sexuality, adultery, sexual harassment, prostitution.
Interdisciplinary Course.
RLSC 750 - Formerly RLSOC 750 - Methods in Social Ethics (3)
This course will explore a range of approaches and theories in social ethics including religious ethics, human rights, justice, moral theology, and feminist ethics.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 753 - Formerly RLSOC 753 - Suffering, Hope, and The Book of Job (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 757 - Formerly RLSOC 757 - Illness of Body, Mind, and Spirit (3)
An examination of basic concepts of psychiatry. Describes their philosophical underpinnings. More concretely, addresses such issues as health and illness in body, mind, and spirit.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 763 - Formerly RLSOC 763 - Black Feminist/Womanist Resources for Ethics (3)
An exploration of the varying forms of social and religious thought that contribute to the construction of Christian social ethics offered by womanist theologians, ethicists, and black feminist scholars from diverse disciplines. Sources include Dolores Williams, bell hooks, Katie Cannon, and Angela Davis.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 768 - Formerly RLSOC 768 - Erikson, Human Development, and Religion (3)
This course explores Erik H. Erikson's work and the implications of his life cycle theory for religion. It further engages in the dialogue with the work of James Fowler exploring a development approach to religion. Additional thinkers included are Robert C. Fuller, Donald Capps, Daniel J. Levinson, and Mary Belenky.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: PSTH - Formerly PASTH+588
RLSC 771 - Formerly RLSOC 771 - Major Thinkers & Major Themes in the Soc. & Anth. of Rel. (3)
A seminar focusing on one particular thinker or one important theme in the history of the social scientific study of religion. Required for sociology of religion concentration.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 775 - Formerly RLSOC 775 - Moral Constructions of Afro-American Intellectuals (3)
An examination of the writing of selected black intellectuals of the 19th and early 20th centuries, such as Maria Stewart, W.E.B. DuBois, Chieke Diop, E. Franklin Frazier. Examines the moral claims and norms that underlie the social vision of these thinkers, to gain insight into some of the complexities of American moral discourse Primarily for graduate students.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 778 - Formerly RLSOC 778 - Psychology of Violence (3)
Psychological and social systems theories are presented as a basis for understanding individual and social systems of oppression. The research and theories of Freud, Fanon, Kohut, Doi, Memmi, Lambly, Bion, and others serve to analyze situations in which groups are dominated for reasons of race, gender, religion, or nationality.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 779 - Formerly RLSOC 779 - Classical Theories in the Sociology of Religion (3)
An introduction to some of the main theories and theorists in the sociological study of religion, developed in the North Atlantic urban centers from the last half of the 19th century to the first decades of the 20th century. Karl Marx's (and his colleague and often co-author, Friedrich Engels'), Max Weber's, and Emile Durkheim's contributions to the sociology of religion are often the focus of this course.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered fall semester in alternate years
RLSC 780 - Formerly RLSOC 780 - Deconstructing Racism (3)
An examination of interdisciplinary approaches that describe how racial superiority and inferiority are socially constructed in the U.S. culture. Investigates some of the ways that social norms about race are translated into moral norms and upheld by institutional and individual behavior.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 781 - Formerly RLSOC 781 - Contemporary Theories in the Sociology of Religion (3)
This course aims to provide students with the background necessary to understand, a) the emergence of new sociological theories of religion in the North Atlantic countries after World War II; b) the links between these theories and the so-called classical theories in the sociology of religion; c) the connections between these theories and the larger field of the social-scientific study of religion; and d) the scope and limits of such theories for the analysis of religious phenomenon.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 783 - Formerly RLSOC 783 - Ethically Responding to Violence Against Women (3)
This course investigates the social and moral dimensions of intimate violence against women in the United States. The course includes biblical and theological literature, narrative accounts, and feminist social science analysis. This course examines the interwoven personal and political dimensions of intimate violence against women, and identifies practical, constructive responses for church leaders who work in local context.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: CSOC - Formerly CHSOC+444
RLSC 785 - Formerly RLSOC 785 - Critical Approaches in Epistemology (3)
This is a course on the subject of human knowledge as a problematic issue, examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Thus, this course will concentrate on some crucial issues interrelating, on the one hand, the sociology, psychology, and biology of knowledge, the history of science and philosophical theories of knowledge, with, on the other hand, human action and religious thought. In particular, we will privilege analytical and critical perspectives on gender, race, culture, and class as cognitive contexts including for theology, ethics, and ministry.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 791 - Formerly RLSOC 791 - Psychology of Women (3)
The course explores various developments in psychology of women with emphasis on the relationship between culture and psychology and between psychology and religion. Included thinkers are Jessica Benjamin, Kim Chernin, Nancy Chodorow, Carol Gilligan, Julia Kristeva, Jean Baker Miller, Luce Irigaray, and Ann Ulanov.
Interdisciplinary Course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
RLSC 798 - Formerly RLSOC 798 - God-Talk With Black Thinkers (3)
This interdisciplinary series highlights Black scholars from across the United States and from around the world. Visiting Black scholars,from a variety of theological disciplines, will offer courses based upon their own theological discipline and religious expertise. An unique aspect of the series will be courses co-taught by spouses who are in the same or complimentary theological disciplines. Same as PSTH - Formerly PASTH+642.
Course may be repeated.
RLSC 799 - Formerly RLSOC 799 - Freud and Jung (3)
No description is available for this course.
RLSC 800 - Formerly RLSOC 800 - Reinhold Niebuhr: Texts and Context (3)
A study of several major works on Christian social ethics by Reinhold Niebuhr combined with analysis of his work by Christian Realists as well as feminist and liberationist critics. Placing his ideas about public ethics within the broader social context in which he wrote them will be emphasized. Topics include racism, political economy, and human sinfulness.

RUSS

RUSS 351 - Formerly 121 - Selected Topics in Russian Literature & Culture (2)
An in-depth study of a topic in Russian cultural studies or of a particular theme, genre or major work of Russian literature read in English translation (students with advanced language skills may opt to do readings in the original). Offerings may include such topics as the Russian short story, post-Soviet Literature, Russian plays, Slavic Folk Culture or Russian Art and Architecture.
Course may be repeated. Offered spring semester.

SPAN

SPAN 366 - Formerly 121 - Advanced Expression and Stylistics (4)
An advanced course in creative writing. Based on the practices of creative writing in different genres and subgenres, translations, and oral production, students will refine their linguistic skills and work towards acquiring a personal style across written contexts. Students will also work toward the development of critical thinking skills when creating new texts. Prerequisite: Gateway course or concurrent registration with Gateway course or special permission.

TPHL - Formerly THEPH

TPHL 626 - Formerly THEPH 326 - Authority of Scripture and Tradition: Ecumenical Advances (3)
Understanding of the "teaching authority of the church" has been one of the most divisive issues in the life of the church. The seminar seeks to study the advances made within the ecumenical movement on the question of the authority of scripture and tradition.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 634 - Formerly THEPH 334 - Process Theology (3)
An in-depth study of the sources and development of process theology, moving from Whitehead's Process and Reality to representative works by recent thinkers, such as Hartshome, Cobb, Griffin, Brock, and Suchocki.
TPHL 635 - Formerly THEPH 335 - Schleiermacher and Tillich (3)
An examination of writings of two theologians of the liberal tradition. Schleiermacher (1768--1834) inaugurated the liberal strain in Protestantism with his revolutionary 1799 Speeches in which he shaped the emergent contours of a universal religion. In his 1822 Christian Faith he unfolded a phenomenology of consciousness that fulfilled the Kantian project for religion. Tillich (1886--1965), referring to Schleiermacher as his spiritual grandfather, developed an existential theology in dialogue with contemporary culture and in some respects brought the grand liberal tradition to a high water mark. His major work of 1951-1963, Sytematic Theology Vols. I, II, III, will be the focus of the course's reflections.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 636 - Formerly THEPH 336 - The Theology of Karl Barth (3)
Consists of two units: 1) Barth's break with liberal theology, and 2) structure and development in the Church Dogmatics. Readings are concentrated in the commentary on Romans and Church Dogmatics I & II. Throughout, historical context and later criticisms and appropriations are considered.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 651 - Formerly THEPH 351 - Asian Theologies (3)
A seminar dealing with major themes and figures in Asian theology.
TPHL 661 - Formerly THEPH 361 - Kant and Hegel (3)
A concentrated study of selected texts, with special, but not exclusive, emphasis on philosophy of religion.
TPHL 662 - Formerly THEPH 362 - American Philosophy (3)
Details the rise of a distinctive American philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries. Figures covered include Emerson, Peirce, James, Royce, Dewey, Santayana, and Buchler. The focus is on the development of pragmatism, idealism, semiotics, naturalism, and systematic metaphysics. Conceptual analyses are correlated with contextual and social studies of the place of Euro-American thought in the larger culture of North America.
Same as: CMFE - Formerly COMFE+362
TPHL 679 - Formerly THEPH 379 - Ecumenical Theology/Modern Liturgies (3)
A cycle of seminars, each examining vital ecumenical concerns. The seminars include Theology of Religions in the Ecumenical Movement; Ecclesiology and Ethics; Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation; Dialogue and Mission; The "Ecumenical" and the "Evangelical"; and History, Development, and Prospects of the Ecumenical Movement.
Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+301
TPHL 680 - Formerly THEPH 380 - Studies in the Philosophy of Religion (3)
Descriptions for each offering are available at the time of registration.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
THEPH 390 - Theory and Theology (3)
Postmodern philosophical resources for theology: radical orthodoxy; poststructuralism and negative theology; postcolonial and feminist theory.
TPHL 691 - Formerly THEPH 391 - Major Figures in Philosophical Theology (3)
A seminar focusing on one major figure from the Western or Eastern traditions. Examples include, but are not limited to, Martin Heidegger, Charles Sanders Peirce, Helena Blavatsky, Sri Aurobindo, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and William James.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 700 - Formerly THEPH 700 - Modern Jewish Theology (3)
A study of developments in Jewish thought in the post-Enlightenment peril beginning with the German-Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. How Jewish philosophy responded to the emergence of a secular society, the Jews new access to university education and social integration and other challenges by modernity. The rise of denominationalism in Jewish religious life.
Offering to be determined.
TPHL 718 - Formerly THEPH 718 - Topics in Theology (3)
This graduate level topics course will offer variable courses in theology aimed primarily at Ph.D. students and advanced Master's of Divinity students. Course may be repeated.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 724 - Formerly THEPH 724 - Theology and Derrida (3)
The course attempts to catch a glimpse of the basic logic and movement of deconstruction (Derrida: "if there is such a thing") and reflect upon recent attempts by various theological interpreters to make a profitable and fecund connection between deconstruction and theology.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
THEPH 725 - Nature, God, and the New Cosmology (3)
An examination of some of the implications of the new cosmology for the traditional ideas. The first part of this course looks at several conceptions of nature as they illuminate science and theology. The second part of the course probes into the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory insofar as they, too, illuminate the relationship between God and Nature. The final part of the course examines current cosmological theories, with particular attention to those of Hawking. Topics include creation and the Big Bang, the origin of time, the no-boundary proposal, the Anthropic principle, the status of eschatology, and the problem of teleology.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 728 - Formerly THEPH 728 - Contemporary Religious Thinkers (3)
Studies in the thought of twentieth-century figures with an eye to their specific contributions to religious thought. Subject changes from year to year.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 741 - Formerly THEPH 741 - Theories and Methods in Theological & Religious Stds (3)
A required course acquainting first-year students with the academic fields of theological and religious studies.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 755 - Formerly THEPH 755 - Theory and Theology (3)
Postmodern philosophical resources for theology: radical orthodoxy; poststructuralism and negative theology; postcolonial and feminist theory.
Signature of instructor required for registration.
TPHL 762 - Formerly THEPH 762 - Tao and Logos: A Confucius/ Taoist-Christian Dialogue (3)
This course consists of an introduction to the basic texts and motifs of the major North East Asian traditions of Confucianism and Daoism, followed by an attempt to bring specific texts, themes, and thinkers into dialogue with Christian theology in order to answer the question: What can Christian theologians learn from Confucianism/Daoism? Students will first read selected primary sources, focusing on the classical figures of Confucius, Mencius, Xunzi, Laozi, and Zhuangzi, and the central themes of Tao, Heaven, ren, ritual, self-cultivation, ziran, and wuwei, and then proceed to examine some examples of Confucian-Christian and/or Daoist-Christian dialogue. Students will also be introduced to methods for the emerging field of comparative theology, notably Robert. C. Neville, Francis X. Clooney, and James Fredericks.
Same as: TPHL - Formerly THEPH+355
TPHL 786 - Formerly THEPH 786 - Ancient Christologies (3)
A contextual exploration of varied ideas about Christ in the critical formative period from the first through the fifth centuries, ending with the "definitive" Christological formulations of the Council of Chalcedon (451 C.E.).
Signature of instructor required for registration. Prerequisite: CHST - Formerly CHIST+202 or its equivalent.

TUTG

TUTG 901 - Formerly 900 - GRADUATE TUTORIAL (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.

WSME - Formerly WESME

WSME 900 - Formerly WESME 900 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Petition to The Academic standing committee is normally required for registration.
WSME 901 - Formerly WESME 901 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Petition to the Academic Standing Committee is normally required for registration.
WSME 990 - Formerly WESME 990 - M.A. Thesis Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration.
WSME 998 - Formerly WESME 998 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH I (9)
No description is available for this course.
WSME 999 - Formerly WESME 999 - Dissertation Research II (9)
No description is available for this course. Prerequisite: WSME - Formerly WESME+998

WMST - Formerly WMSTG

WMST 710 - Formerly WMSTG 710 - Theory and Methodology in Women's Studies (3)
An interdisciplinary course focused on contemporary feminist theory. The objectives of the course are first, to explore the broad range of theories that make up the body of contemporary scholarship referred to as "feminist theory"; second, to examine feminist critiques and innovations in methodologies in many fields; and third, to consider some of the fundamental questions these theories raise about the origins of gender difference, the nature and origins of patriarchy, the intersections between gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality as categories of analysis and bases of oppression or empowerment.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as WMST+112 (see CLA catalog for description). Same as WMST+112 (see CLA catalog for description).
WMST 711 - Formerly WMSTG 711 - History of Feminist Thought (3)
An interdisciplinary course that explores the development of feminist theories principally in the United States and Europe from Mary Wollstonecraft through "the Second Wave. The course examines the work of such theorists as Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Anna Julia Cooper, Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Mary Church Terrell, Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan, as well as feminism's evolving conversations with liberalism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis and its dialogues with the anti-slavery/civil rights movements and the gay/lesbian rights movements.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as WMST+111 (see CLA catalog for course description). Same as WMST+111 (see CLA catalog for course description).
WMST 712 - Formerly WMSTG 712 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Women's Studies (3)
A foundational seminar for students intending to include the study of gender and/or women as a significant part of their graduate training in any area. This seminar aims to make students conversant with contemporary epistemological, methodological and theoretical conversations and debates in recent feminist scholarship from many fields. The first half of the course will involve discussion of common readings, development of a common theoretical vocabulary and of research skills, The second half will be a colloquium series with visiting feminist scholars, some from Drew and some from outside of Drew, discussing their own theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of women and gender.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
WMST 717 - Formerly WMSTG 717 - Ain't I a Woman?: African - American Women and Teaching (3)
See RLSC - Formerly RLSC - Formerly RLSOC for course description.
Signature of instructor required for registration. Same as: RLSC - Formerly RLSC - Formerly RLSOC+711
WMST 901 - Formerly WMSTG 900 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
WMSTG 901 - Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.
WMST 990 - Formerly WMSTG 990 - M.A. Thesis Tutorial (3)
No description is available for this course. Signature of instructor required for registration.

WMST - Formerly WMSTT

WMST 712 - Formerly WMSTT 712 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Women's Studies (3)
A foundation seminar for students intending to include the study of gender and/or women as a significant part of their graduate training in any area. This seminar aims to make students conversant with contemporary epistemogical methodological and theoretical conversations and debates in recent feminists scholarship from many fields. The first half of the course will involve discussions of common readings, development of a common theoretical vocabulary and of research skills. The second half will be a colloquium series with visiting feminist scholars, some from Drew and some from outside of Drew, discussing their own theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of women and gender.
Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration.