• Flexible curriculum for diverse career options. Students majoring in physics at Drew are prepared for careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and other fields, including law, education, medicine, and business.
  • High academic quality. Most students (approximately 75% of physics majors) go on to graduate or professional schools, pursuing physics, astrophysics, biomedical, environmental, civil, and aeronautical engineering, energy and environmental policy, law school, medical school, and secondary education.  Recent schools include Boston University, Duke, Colorado, Vanderbilt, Lehigh, Brown, Kansas, Rochester Institute of Optics, Michigan, Cornell, Notre Dame, and the University of Virginia.  These students receive fellowships and research/teaching assistantships that cover the full tuition of the graduate school plus living expenses.
  • Supportive environment. Our close-knit department has a supportive, mentoring environment for learning.  Upper-level classes typically have 5-10 students.
  • Emphasis on research. Various research opportunities are available through grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF).  Many students participate in summer research projects in atomic physics, optics/photonics, astronomy, and biophysics, while earning stipends and free housing as part of the Drew Summer Science Institute (DSSI).  Some students successfully publish their work and present it at professional meetings.  Approximately 75% of majors complete independent study projects or honors theses.
  • Engineering Program. For students interested in engineering, there is a dual degree program affiliated with Columbia University.  This program leads to a liberal-arts (B.A.) degree from Drew and an engineering (B.S.) degree from Columbia. Participants commonly enter the engineering school after their junior or senior years at Drew.
  • Astronomy/astrophysics. Drew has a computer-automated 16″ research-grade telescope with CCD camera in the rooftop observatory.  There are public viewings of special celestial events, and research and employment opportunities for students working as observatory assistants.
  • Biophysics. Drew offers interdisciplinary courses and research opportunities in biophysics and computational neuroscience, with a strong interdisciplinary connection to the biology and neuroscience departments.
  • Computational science. The physics department hosts a high-performance computer server for numerical simulations and data analysis.  Students learn how to use scientific computing software, such as Matlab and Mathematica, which are widely used in academia and industries.
  • Active physics RISE participation. A physics member of RISE, who has retired from world-renowned Bell Laboratories, directs senior physics projects or honors theses.
  • Especially hospitable to women. About half of Drew’s physics majors have been women; this is a long-term trend that has been recognized in a national APS survey.
  • Summer internship at large research institutions. In the past five years, eight physics majors participated in summer research projects at Cornell, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, Kansas, Penn State, Lehigh, and Stony Brook.
  • Active Society of Physics Students (SPS) Chapter. Our physics student club is a part of a national organization which promotes academic and social interactions and career opportunities.  There are SPS-sponsored picnics, holiday parties, talks, field trips, etc.  Students are also inducted into Drew’s chapter of the national physics honor society, Sigma Pi Sigma.  The department newsletter, The Dilated Times, is run by the physics students.