Frequently Asked Questions

The following are summary answers to frequently asked questions about Drew’s Dual Degree/Combined Plan program with Columbia University. For the most accurate and complete information, please consult with Drew’s Dual Degree Liaison Officer and the participating school.

  1. What are some advantages of the dual degree program?
  2. If I know I want to be an engineer, should I consider a dual degree program?
  3. What do I need to do to participate in the dual degree program?
  4. How good do my grades have to be in order to participate in the dual degree program?
  5. Am I guaranteed admission to a participating engineering school?
  6. Who is the Dual Degree/Combined Plan Liaison Officer?
  7. What are the courses that are required for the program?
  8. Will I be limited in my choice of major if I participate in the program?
  9. If I intend to transfer to the engineering school after three years at Drew, will I need to have completed all of Drew’s graduation requirements in that time?
  10. If I have financial aid at Drew, will it transfer with me to the engineering school?
  11. Are there any disadvantages to participating in the dual degree program?
  12. Are there any opportunities to experience aspects of an engineering program earlier in my Drew career?
  13. What happens if I change my mind and decide not to pursue the dual degree program?
  14. When will I get my Drew degree if I transfer to the engineering school after three years?
  15. Can I get a Masters Degree (M.S.) in engineering as part of these programs?

 

 

  1. What are some advantages of the dual degree program?
    Students who may not be sure of their career goals can choose to keep their engineering options open for several more years. Engineers from this program will have been more broadly educated taking humanities courses in a liberal arts environment. And the transition to a more structured rigorous engineering curriculum will be more gradual.
  2. If I know I want to be an engineer, should I consider a dual degree program?
    Students who are confident in their desire to be an engineer may prefer the more direct path to a B.S. engineering degree at an engineering school. A year of school and its financial cost are saved. But often students are unsure of their choice and not completely informed about an engineering career. The dual degree program is more flexible in keeping options open.
  3. What do I have to do to participate in the dual degree program?
    No official applications are made until you are ready to transfer to the engineering school. Upon arrival at Drew, it is important to meet with the Drew Dual Degree Liaison Officer to begin to plan your Drew curriculum with the dual degree course requirements in mind.
  4. How good do my grades have to be in order to be considered for acceptance into the dual degree program?
    A Drew GPA of 3.3 overall and in your mathematics and science courses is a bare minimum for acceptance to the engineering school. Higher grades will make you more competitive in the engineering environment.
  5. Am I guaranteed admission to a participating engineering school?
    The agreement signed by Drew and the participating engineering school guarantees transfer admission provided that the required prerequisite courses have been completed and the GPA requirement met. The Dual Degree Liaison Officer must certify that the requirements are completed and supply a favorable recommendation.
  6. Who is the Drew Dual Degree/Combined Plan Liaison Officer?
    This is a person at Drew, normally a faculty member, who advises Drew students interested in the program. He or she receives timely information regarding the programs from the participating schools, and is responsible for formally recommending a student for admission to the engineering school.
  7. What are the courses that are required for the program?
    The courses vary somewhat depending on the actual engineering or applied science program selected. But all programs require 4 semesters of calculus through differential equations, two semesters with lab of calculus-based physics, one semester with lab of chemistry, and one semester of computer science. Some of the programs require additional math, chemistry, or physics. Another group of humanities courses (writing and economics) are required but are normally easily met by the distribution requirement at Drew.
  8. Will I be limited in my choice of major if I participate in the program?
    The simple answer is no, but more explanation is necessary. Since a fair number of science courses are required prerequisites for these programs, it is easier to meet them AND the requirements for a Drew major if you are majoring in one of the sciences at Drew. For example, a physics major would automatically take most of the engineering prerequisites as part of the physics curriculum. The farther afield you go from a science major, the more carefully you must plan your curricular schedule.
  9. If I intend to transfer to the engineering school after three years at Drew, will I need to have completed all of Drew’s graduation requirements in that time?
    A student should have substantially completed most of Drew’s graduation requirements INCLUDING those for a major. Meeting all of the major requirements, especially in the sciences, can sometimes be difficult. Often an agreement is made with the major department at Drew to substitute one or more related courses at the engineering school for a remaining major requirement at Drew.
  10. If I have financial aid at Drew, will it transfer with me to the engineering school?
    Financial aid granted by Drew or other agencies for attendance at Drew will NOT transfer to the engineering school. Columbia University has need-based financial aid available for admitted program students. Information on merit aid should be requested from the participating school. In any case, a new application for financial aid will have to be made.
  11. Are there any disadvantages to participating in the dual degree program?
    Perhaps the major disadvantage is the additional year and expense required to receive both degrees. Additionally students who transfer after three years will miss their senior year at Drew, a year often offering a capstone experience in the form of undergraduate research or independent study.
  12. Are there any opportunities to experience aspects of an engineering program earlier in my Drew career?
    Drew students have occasionally taken preparatory engineering courses at other nearby engineering schools during a regular semester or over the summer.
  13. What happens if I change my mind and decide not to pursue the dual degree program?
    As long as you are making normal progress toward your Drew degree requirements, there is no penalty attached to dropping the idea of the dual degree. No official application is made to the program until you actually apply to transfer to the engineering school.
  14. When will I get my Drew degree if I transfer to the engineering school after three years?
    Normally a student pursuing a “3-2″ option will receive both degrees (B.A. and B.S.) at the end of five years when all requirements for both degrees have been completed. A student leaving Drew at the end of four years and pursuing a “4-2″ option will receive their B.A. degree from Drew upon leaving Drew.
  15. Can I get a Masters Degree (M.S.) in engineering as part of these programs?
    Dual degree students earning both a B.A. from Drew and a B.S at the engineering school can apply for an advanced engineering degree and remain for that training. A Masters degree will likely take an additional one or two years. Four year Drew students who have majored in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or certain other physical sciences at Drew, may apply to Columbia for a “4-2″ Master of Science Program. The M.S. degree is earned in two years after graduating from Drew. Admission to this program is NOT guaranteed. Graduating science majors at Drew have also applied to a number of other engineering schools and have been accepted into masters and doctoral engineering programs.