The composer and professor on a student trip to New York City
The composer and professor on a student trip to New York City

Trevor Weston Choral Works is his first release.

November 2016 – Drew University’s main venue for live events is also a prime place to record music.

Case in point: 13 of the 15 songs on a new choral album from Associate Professor of Music Trevor Weston were recorded at The Concert Hall inside the Dorothy Young Center for the Arts. Trevor Weston Choral Works is a collaboration with Julian Wachner and features the Choir of Trinity Wall Street and its contemporary music orchestra, Novus NY. It’s the first release from Weston, who began teaching at Drew in 2009. In an interview with Drew.edu, the accomplished composer reflects on his latest work and lifelong interest in music.

What was the inspiration for the album?

My relationship with conductor Julian Wachner. Julian and I went to choir school and reconnected in 2002. Last year, in May 2015, he organized a concert of my choral music and said he wanted to record a CD.

What led you to record at Drew?

Internationally acclaimed musicians Wu Han and David Finckel organize The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center concert series at Drew and perform here three times a year. It made sense because Drew has a rich offering and part of it is The Concert Hall.

'I write music that reflects my experience.'
‘I write music that reflects my experience.’

What makes The Concert Hall special?

The acoustician and the architect who organized our concert hall organized Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Auditorium and Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. Also, The Concert Hall is state of the art.

How would you describe your music?

I like creating pieces that connect things that we normally would not connect to see if that creates something new that we can learn from or something we have felt but haven’t really heard from before. I lived in Paris, different places in this country and my parents are from the Caribbean. I write music that reflects my experience. What makes America interesting is that we blend a lot to create new things and it’s through that blending that something unique occurs. It’s a part of my experience and it’s our experience in this country.

When did you first start singing?

By the time I was 6, I was in the choir at Grace Episcopal Church in Plainfield, New Jersey and had music knowledge. While I was singing in the choir, my parents were told of St. Thomas Choir School in New York City. I enrolled at age 10 and performed professionally in the choir.