Note: This program is only available to Drew students.

Certainly, New York City is the nerve center of the United States economy and, to a large extent, the world’s. Step away from the frenzy of the trading floor, however, and few people can really explain the mechanics-the economics-of Wall Street, why its influence is so vast and what the fluctuations in exchanges and markets mean to the average person. Fewer still have the opportunity to explore New York’s financial world close up, to hear from the men and women who make the decisions, execute the trades, manage the funds, plan the mergers, and regulate the activity.

The Wall Street Semester brings Drew University students into the financial district to learn from professionals who work in the financial world, and to visit the places that are so integral to the U.S. economy. You will take a critical look at Wall Street’s operations, learn the economics behind the transactions, explore the district’s history, and discuss ethical and moral issues. At the end of the semester, you will have a deep understanding of the role of Wall Street within the rest of the economy, as well as an appreciation for topics and controversies affecting New York’s financial sector.

Required Course

ECON 281/Wall St. and the Economy (8 credits)
This program studies the institutions and operations of financial markets, and their roles in channeling credit and financing new investments. Students will learn the relation between the financial system and local, national, and global economies. The program will also explain the financial history and ethical dimensions of Wall Street and its relation to macroeconomic policy. This program also delves into the practical day-to-day operations of the financial markets and institutions located in New York City. Central to the program are talks by guest speakers drawn from the finance industry itself, as well as from corporations, government regulatory agencies, and institutional investors, shareholder activists, academics and nonprofit agencies. The class will also go on visits to securities firms, the New York Stock Exchange, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and non-profit organizations. Speakers, field trips, and student projects explore recent issues, such as the impact of derivatives and other financial innovations on the housing sector and the economy.

To complete a full, sixteen-credit semester, you may enroll in courses normally offered on campus.

Spring 2014 Program Director

Professor Marc Tomljanovich, Associate Professor of Economics

Program Calendar

The Wall Street Semester runs during Drew’s spring semester, from late January through mid-May, with a mid-term break in March.

Eligibility

To participate in the Wall Street Semester, you must:

  1. be a sophomore, junior or senior at Drew University;
  2. have taken Principles of Microeconomics and Principles of Macroeconomics;
  3. be in good disciplinary standing.

Cost

The program fee includes tuition, round-trip transportation to New York City and program-related events and activities.

Financial Aid

All of your Drew University financial assistance, whether merit or need-based, may be applied to all Drew-sponsored semester programs.