Events.

 

Events

Spring 2018 Programs

Monday, March 19, 2018  • 4–6 p.m.
Dorothy Young Center for the Arts, Room 106, Drew University

From the Holocaust to Social Justice: Part 1 of the three-part study seminar: A screening of the 2013 documentary film, Joachim Prinz: I Shall Not be Silent (50 minutes long).  In 1930’s Berlin, Joachim Prinz witnessed how the Nazis stripped away the civil rights of Jews. When he arrived in the U.S. in 1937 and witnessed racism against African-Americans, he was inspired to act. As rabbi of Temple B’nai Abraham in Newark, NJ and later as President of the American Jewish Congress, Prinz became a leader of the civil rights movement. He spoke at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where he declared: “bigotry and hatred are not the most urgent problem. The most urgent, the most disgraceful, the most shameful and the most tragic problem is silence.” Moments later, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. The screening will be followed by a discussion with film’s co-producers and co-directors, Rachel Fisher and Rachel Pasternak. Free and open to the public.

Monday, March 26, 2018 • 4–6 p.m.
Dorothy Young Center for the Arts, Room 106, Drew University

From the Holocaust to Social Justice: Part 2 of the three-part study seminar
A screening of the 2000 documentary film, From Swastika to Jim Crow (60 minutes long). The film explores the similarities between Nazism in Germany (the Swastika) and racism in the American south (Jim Crow.)  In 1939, the Nazi government expelled Jewish scholars from German universities.  Many of them found teaching positions in Southern universities, where they sympathized with the plight of their African-American colleagues and students.  The screening will be followed by a discussion with Dr. Lillie Edwards, Professor Emerita of History and Pan African Studies at Drew University.  Free and open to the public.

Monday, April 2, 2018  • 4–6 p.m.
Dorothy Young Center for the Arts, Room 106, Drew University

From the Holocaust to Social Justice: Part 3 of the three-part study seminar:  Dr. Sue Lederman, Professor Emerita of Public Administration at Kean University, will recount her experience as a hidden child during the Holocaust and how it prompted her involvement in community activism. Co-author of Elections in America: Control and Influence in Democratic Politics, Dr. Lederman has served as president/director/chair of many civic and professional organizations, including the League of Women Voters of the United States, the Common Cause National Governing Association, and the Northeastern Political Science Association.   Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 12, 2018  • 4–6 p.m.
Mead Hall, Founders Room, Drew University

Talk by Hana Berger Moran, Child Survivor of the Holocaust
In commemoration of Yom HaShoah, there will be a talk by Hana Berger Moran, PhD, who as a baby was liberated from Concentration Camp Mauthausen (now in Austria). The story of her and her mother Priska is included in the book by Wendy Holden, Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope. The story of Hana and her mother Priska is included in the book by Wendy Holden, Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance and Hope.  Priska gave birth to Hana in a concentration camp in Mauthausen, Austria on a bare plank right before Americans liberated the camp.  Hana will discuss her mother’s experiences  and what it was like to meet other Holocaust babies 65 years after liberation. Free and open to the public.