Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study.

 

Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study

A Special Note

It is with great sadness that we announce that Jacqueline Berke, founding Director and Director Emerita of the Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study, passed away on Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Jackie, as we all knew her, was 94 years old. She was born and raised in New York, NY; and lived in Orange, and Millburn, before moving to Madison, NJ. A graduate of George Washington High School, NYC, she received her Bachelors degree from New York University, a Masters degree in Journalism from Columbia University, and a Masters degree in English from Rutgers University. She served as Professor of English at Drew University from 1960 to 1992, and as Professor Emerita for many years. She founded the Holocaust Center at Drew University in 1993, and served at various times as its Director, Co-Director and Director Emerita. She was the author of a popular rhetoric text book, Twenty Questions for the Writer and editor of the Center’s book, Moments in Time: A Collage of Holocaust Memories. She will be sorely missed.

Founded in 1992 through a generous grant from the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education, the Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study organizes and sponsors a wide variety of programs. We offer, for instance, an annual event every November in memory of Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass) and an annual spring event in commemoration of Yom HaShoah (Day of Remembrance). We also schedule films, lectures, performances, workshops, discussions, and other events dealing with the Holocaust and with genocides such as those in Armenia, Bosnia, Cambodia, Darfur, and Rwanda.

We enrich Drew’s undergraduate and graduate course work by bringing notable scholars and speakers to campus, by organizing visits to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, by supporting faculty research, and by providing additional resources that enhance the study of Holocaust and genocide.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Drew University Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study is to COMMEMORATE those who perished in the Holocaust and to CELEBRATE those who survived; to EDUCATE upcoming generations to “remember for the future”; and to DEDICATE our energies to ongoing Research and Scholarship. The Center’s moral imperative to action is inspired by John Donne: “Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee.” Our mission includes those genocides that foreshadowed the Holocaust, those that followed it, and those that continue to erupt. As a part of Drew University, the Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study supports and abides by the mission and by-laws of the University.

Community Education

All events are open to the public.

See our full events list

On October 17, 2017, Fran Malkin, a child survivor of the Holocaust, spoke about her experiences, are featured in the documentary film No. 4 Street of our Lady.

 

 

 

On October 3, 2017, Dr. Jason Jordan, Associate Professor of Political Science at Drew University, surveyed political developments and consequences of the rise in nationalist movements in the U.S. and Europe.


On April 24, 2017, Holocaust Survivor David Tuck shared his story with Drew University for Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. Mr. Tuck was born in Poland and labored in a series of concentration camps – including a sub-camp of Auschwitz. His hardships were substantial, but he once said, “if you have life, you have hope” and “As long as I’m alive, I’m going to keep doing this.”On April 24, 2017, Holocaust Survivor David Tuck shared his story with Drew University for Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. Mr. Tuck was born in Poland and labored in a series of concentration camps – including a sub-camp of Auschwitz. His hardships were substantial, but he once said, “if you have life, you have hope” and “As long as I’m alive, I’m going to keep doing this.”


On October 27, 2016, the Center was honored to have longtime associate Hedy Brasch share her first-hand experiences during the Holocaust. Her powerful talk detailed how she and her family were first deported from Hungary to the “world of evil” that is Auschwitz and then later to concentration camp Bergen-Belsen, which she barely survived.


Dr. Gregory H. Stanton, Dr. Ann Saltzman, Director Emerita, Dr. Larry Greene, Board Associate and Dr. Joshua Kavaloski, Director

On September 12, 2016, Dr. Gregory H. Stanton, Research Professor in Genocide Studies and Prevention at George Mason University, discussed the recent decision by the U.S. to describe ISIS’s actions in Syria and Iraq as “genocide” and about the political importance of genocide recognition.


From left to right: Ann Saltman, Center Director Emerita; Elizabeth Turchi, Esq.; Prof. Lawrence Douglas; Prof. Devin Pendas and Prof. Joshua Kavaloski, Center Director

On November 12, 2015, the Center organized a conference commemorating Kristallnacht in honor of the 70th anniversary of the international Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, “From Nuremberg to The Hague: The Evolution of War Crimes Trials.” Our speakers were Prof. Devin Pendas, Boston College, Prof. Lawrence Douglas, Amherst College and Elizabeth Turchi, Esq., Director of the Kean University Human Rights Institute.


Selma Tennenbaum Rossen (center rear) surrounded by Drew students after her talk.

On October 21, 2015, Selma Tennenbaum Rossen, hidden as a child in Poland during the Holocaust, spoke about her experiences in a Center program at Drew University’s Brothers College.


Drew students join Dr. Joshua Kavaloski, Director and Dr. Ann Saltzman, Director Emerita of the Center.

To commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide on April 25, 2015, the Center held a planting of Forget-Me-Not seedlings at Drew University’s Seminary Hall Garden


We Invite Your Membership

Membership not only supports Center programs and events, but also offers the opportunity to join the network of those dedicated to remembering the past and safe-guarding the future. It includes numerous occasions to meet survivors, liberators, Holocaust/genocide scholars, and educators.