Christine Kinealy is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin, where she completed a Ph.D. on the introduction of the Poor Law to Ireland. She has published extensively on the impact of the Great Irish Famine and has lectured on the relationship between poverty, famine, and emigration in Ireland, India, Spain, Canada, France, Finland, the United States, and New Zealand. In 1997 she was invited to speak on the Irish Famine in both the United States Congress and the British Parliament. Her other areas of specialization are nineteenth-century Ireland, the 1848 revolutions, Daniel O’Connell, Young Ireland, Irish-American nationalism, and memory and commemoration in Irish history. Her book This Great Calamity: The Irish Famine 1845-52 (2nd ed. 2006) was named the Irish Post book of year in 1995. Her other publications include Lives of Victorian Politicians: Daniel O’Connell (Pickering and Chatto, 2008); A New History of Ireland (2nd ed. 2004); 1848: The Year the World Turned?, ed. with Kay Boardman (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2007); Teaching and Learning History (with Geoff Timmins and Keith Vernon; Sage Publications, 2005); The Great Famine in Ireland: Impact, Ideology and Rebellion (Palgrave, 2002); Ireland: A Photohistory 1840-1940 (with Sean Sexton; Thames and Hudson, 2002); Memory, Silence and Commemoration: Ireland’s Great Hunger (ed. with David Valone; University Press of America, 2002); The Forgotten Famine: Hunger and Poverty in Belfast 1840-50 (with Gerard MacAtasney; Pluto Press, 2000); A Disunited Kingdom: England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, 1800-1949 (Cambridge University Press, 1999), and A Death-Dealing Famine: The Great Hunger in Ireland (Pluto Press, 1997). Her latest book, Repeal and Revolution: The 1848 Uprising in Ireland, is forthcoming from Manchester University Press. Currently she is exploring the role played by the Irish nationalist Daniel O’Connell in the antislavery movement in Europe and North America.