Semester on the United Nations

 

United Nations

Classes begin in late August, end in early December and are held in New York or on campus on Wednesdays and/or Fridays. 

Applications are due March 10.

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Travel

To the the center of global affairs.
Just a train ride away from Drew’s campus, on the banks of the East River, sits the United Nations, the world’s most notable international organization.

Outside the headquarters building, colorful flags flutter, representing each of the UN’s 193 member states.

Inside, a global staff are tasked with the promotion and safeguard of international peace and security.

Here, and in Drew’s UN classroom just across 1st Avenue, students meet with diplomats, policy experts and UN Secretariat staff to understand how the UN functions. Visit offices of major non-governmental organizations—Human Rights Watch or the Population Council are two student favorites—to expand your knowledge.

Rethink

The changing face of international diplomacy.

Why do states value global governance and comply with international law? How do historical developments, including the horrors associated with WWII, shape the UN’s infrastructure? How has the UN contributed to current international affairs? What is the future of the UN?

Explore

Solutions to global challenges.

Think peace and security. Climate change. Sustainable development. Include, too, human rights, disarmament and terrorism. Round out the list with humanitarian and health emergencies, gender equality, governance and food production.

The UN’s scope is vast, and you examine all of it in classes and via guest lectures.

Delve deeply into the UN’s efforts to prevent conflict, help parties in conflict make peace and create the conditions to allow peace to hold and flourish.

Put your newfound knowledge to work in a General Assembly simulation exercise where you play the role of a member state.

Connect

The Semester at the United Nations draws students from disciplines such as history, political science, international relations, sociology, foreign languages and philosophy.

Add this immersive experience to your Launch plan and you will develop skills vital to careers in foreign service, government, journalism, law, public policy, non-governmental organizations, international business, teaching and research.