Financial Aid & Scholarships.

 

Financial Aid & Scholarships

Drew is committed to making education accessible and affordable for everyone and provides generous financial aid. 85% of our students receive need-based aid, and we offered over $33 million in institutional grants and scholarships in 2019–2020.

We know that financing your college education can be complicated. That’s why we are with you every step of the way. We’ll give you personal attention, with an assigned financial aid counselor to help you understand the process. At Drew, you won’t be transferred to anonymous call centers or shuffled between counselors unfamiliar with your situation.

 

We are one of 10 private schools on Fiske’s “Best Buy” list, and the only New Jersey school—public or private—in the top 20.

Learn more.

Coronavirus Information

Drew University continues to monitor COVID-19 and is operating in Drew Virtual Time for both learning and business through August 7. The University intends to welcome students to campus for the fall semester beginning August 16, with an on-time start of classes August 24. Read more.

Visit the COVID-19 resource site for ongoing updates and answers to FAQ.

COVID-19: Financial Aid FAQs

Financial Aid Basics

Financial aid is any form of monetary support that assists you in paying for college, and it comes in many forms:

Grants & Scholarships

Grants and scholarships are gift aid that does not need to be paid back. Some forms of gift aid, especially from federal or state sources, are based upon financial need and require that you file the FAFSA to determine eligibility.

Loans

Loans are a form of financial aid that must be paid back with interest to the lender over an extended period of time. All students who file the FAFSA will, at a minimum, automatically qualify for a Direct Student Loan from the federal government.

Work-Study

Work-Study allows students to work on or off campus. The earnings from this position are considered financial aid and not income, so these earnings do not lessen your eligibility for need-based aid in the future. In order to be considered for a federal Work-Study job, you must file a FAFSA. While you may be awarded a specific amount of Work-Study eligibility, you will only earn the amount equivalent to the number of hours worked. This amount will not be deducted from your bill; rather, it will be paid out incrementally, as it is earned. Work-Study funds are limited and awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, so file your FAFSA early.

Learn More About Work Study

Payment Plans

Payment plans allow students to structure tuition payments and other fees into installments throughout the year instead of paying a lump sum at the beginning of each semester.