The Mead Meadow is a wildlife habitat between Mead Hall and Brothers College that was established in the Summer of 2013. Mowing is reduced to once a year in order to support tree health. What does this mean? Trees are stressed from compact soil. By reducing mowing, soil has a chance to become aerated and tree roots can get more oxygen. More oxygen to tree roots means healthier trees. Soil is further aerated and loosened by planting wildflowers and native grasses that have deep root systems. The wildflowers planted are listed below.

Classes from multiple departments frequent the meadow as a teaching tool for students.

Thank you to the volunteers that helped plant wildflowers in the meadow!

Connect with nature by walking through the designated footpaths in the meadow. Watch the meadow progress into a diverse floral display with beautiful grasses and healthier trees. Enjoy!

Photo Gallery

Wildflowers Planted in the Mead Meadow

Click on the scientific name for an image and more information. All plants are native.

Scientific Name                                   Common Name

Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Milkweed
Aster novi-belgii NY Aster
Coreopsis Lanceolata Lanceleaf Coreopsis
Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower
Heliopsis Helianthoides Oxeye Sunflower
Lobelia siphilitica Great Blue Lobelia
Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamont
Penstemon digitalis Foxglove Beardtongue
Rudbeckia fulgida Orange Coneflower
Rudbeckia hirta Black-eyed Susan
Verbena hastata Blue Vervain
Mertensia virginica Virginia Bluebells
Dicentra eximia  Wild bleeding heart
Agastache foeniculum Giant Hyssop
Eupatorium maculatum Joe Pye
Lobelia cardinalis  Cardinal flower
Solidago juncea Early Goldenrod
Dennstaedtia punctilobula Hayscented fern
Geranium maculatum   Woodland Geranium
Tiarella cordifolia Foam Flower
Pycnanthemum species Mountain mint

More information

According to the EPA, “operating a typical gasoline-powered lawn mower for one hour produces the same amount of smog-forming hydrocarbons as driving an average car almost 200 miles under typical driving conditions.”

Wall Street Journal article on the rise of meadows versus lawns.