Short Bio  Fred Curtis is Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies at Drew University where he has been teaching since 1979. He earned a B.A. in Economics from Haverford College (1973) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst (1976, 1983).

Fred teaches several courses in the area of environmental economics, including (1) Environmental Economics, (2) Economics of Business and Environmental Sustainability, (3) Economics of Climate Change and Peak Oil and (4) Consumption, Economics, Well-being and Environment. Fred also teaches the popular Corporations in Context course in the Business Studies major and a core course in the Environmental Studies and Sustainability major: Environment, Society and Sustainability.

Research Interests  Fred’s current research concerns (1) the economics of rebuilding local and regional community economies as a response to peak oil and (2) the impact of global warming and peak oil on globalization. His published works include articles on the economics of apartheid South Africa, teaching about homelessness, the economics of liberal arts colleges, and – more recently – eco-local economies and economic issues related to peak oil and global warming. Fred is also interested in the issue of values in economics and the connection of Buddhist ideas to economics.

Selected Publications/Working Papers

(with David Ehrenfeld, Professor of Conservation Biology, Rutgers University), “The New Geography of Trade: Interacting impacts of the End of Cheap Oil and Changing Climate”, submitted to a special issue on National Security in the 21st Century, Solutions, January, 2012 issue – accepted

  • “Peak Oil” and “Peak Oil: an Annotated Bibliography”, in the on-line reference Global Reference on the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Online Collection. Detroit: Gale, 2011
  • “Peak Globalization: Climate Change, Oil Depletion, and Global Trade”, Ecological Economics Vol. 69, No. 2 (December       2009), 427-434
  • “Eco-Localism and Sustainability”, Ecological Economics, vol. 46, No. 1 (August 2003), pp. 83-102.
  •  “Ivy-Covered Exploitation: Class, Education and the Liberal Arts College”, in J.K. Gibson-Graham, et. al., (Eds.), Re/presenting Class (Duke University Press, 2001), pp. 81-104.

(with David Ehrenfeld, Professor of Conservation Biology, Rutgers University), “The New Geography of Trade: Interacting impacts of the End of Cheap Oil and Changing Climate”, submitted to a special issue on National Security in the 21st Century, Solutions, January, 2012 issue – accepted

  • “Peak Oil” and “Peak Oil: an Annotated Bibliography”, in the on-line reference Global Reference on the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Online Collection. Detroit: Gale, 2011
  • “Peak Globalization: Climate Change, Oil Depletion, and Global Trade”, Ecological Economics Vol. 69, No. 2 (December 2009), 427-434