Chronologies are an excellent way to trace the history of events. By paying close attention to any event that happened, even small ones, a researcher can begin to see a cause and effect relationship played out. In terms of the Holocaust, chronologies can be very enlightening, as they clearly display the path that the Final Solution took from beginning to end.

1. A World in Turmoil: An Integrated Chronology of the Holocaust and World War II (Greenwood Press, 1991)

Hershel and Abraham J. Edelheit’s A World in Turmoil: An Integrated Chronology of the Holocaust and World War II (Greenwood Press, 1991) traces the history of the Holocaust and World War II, with clear emphasis on events in Europe and in the Middle East. A small amount of attention is paid to Asia, Africa and the Americas.

The introduction to the book offers an overview of the world starting in the late nineteenth century leading up to 1933. According to the authors the goal of the chronology is to show the “…unfolding of the Nazi regime, its quest for global domination and its attempt to exterminate Jewry through the ‘Final Solution’.” (p.1)

Divided into 16 chapters, each chapter represents one year starting with 1933 and ending in 1948, with the reinstatement of Israel. Types of events covered by the chronology include battles, aktionen, creation and liquidation of major and minor concentration camps and ghettos.

The epilogue presents an overview of the world since 1948. Each entry of one to four lines provides basic facts with no analysis or comment. Special features include a glossary, bibliography, name index, place index, and subject index.

2. The Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto: 1941-1944 (Yale University Press, 1984)

The Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto: 1941-1944 (Yale University Press, 1984), chronicles the situation in the Lodz Ghetto, listing and describing events that happened on specific dates. It includes some maps and photographs.