Free Trade Agreements: Who Wins? Who Loses? Rethinking US Trade Policy

On March 6th from 7:30-9:30 pm The Network for Responsible Public Policy will host a lecture on the topic of Free Trade Agreements in LC28 of the Rose Memorial Library.

William Milberg, Professor of Economics at the New School for Social Research, and Josh Bivens, Director of Research at the Economic Policy Institute, will discuss the social and economic effects of free trade agreements.  The speakers will examine how those at the top of society have gained substantially from free trade agreements while many workers have been hit with low wage competition, reduced salaries, outsourcing, and unemployment. The dialogue will touch on how competition from poorly regulated economies has lowered environmental and public health protections in others.  How did this happen? What changes in US trade policy and trade negation processes are needed to address these concerns?

Free and open to the public.  Seating is limited, so register today!

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and the Institue for Sustainable Enterprise at FDU.

Climate Change and the Economy: Sorting Fact from Fiction

On March 21st from 7:30-9:30 The Network for Responsible Public Policy will host a lecture on the topic of Climate Change and the Economy: Sorting Fact from Fiction in LC28 of the Rose Memorial Library.
The speakers will discussed the dialogue around the relationship between addressing climate change and the possibility of harming the economy.  The speakers also touched on why the dialogue on the environment has become contentious, the cause of this divide, and what the prospects for our future are.  The discussion then shifted to how businesses, local, and state governments can respond, as well as where New Jersey fits into a clean economy.

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement, the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Drew’s Environmental Studies and Sustainability Program (ESS), and the Institue for Sustainable Enterprise at FDU.

 

Alternative Spring Break to Appalachia

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Drew students traveled to Harlan, Kentucky for a week long trip designed to deepen students’ understanding of Environmental Justice. On the trip, students learned about mountaintop removal and the ecological, cultural and economic significance of mining in local communities.

Student activities will included the following:

  • Service work planting trees on an abandoned strip mine site and home weatherization work
  • Visit to a mountaintop removal site
  • Hike the Appalachian mountains
  • Visit the Kentucky Coal Mining Museum and Thrift Shop
  • Round table discussion with coalfield residents (KFTC, SAMS, RRENEW) and speakers.
  • A screening of the 1976 Academy-award winning documentary on the United Mine Workers strike in Harlan
  • Live music and dancing at a local community center

Interactive Dance Performance at Morris View Nursing Center

Recently, Drew’s visiting professor of dance, Kimani Fowlin, organized a performance and interactive dance session with residents at Morris View Nursing Home in Morristown, New Jersey. Many Drew performing arts students participated in making the program a success, and hope to return in the fall to host the program again.

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American Elections: The Challenge of Dark Money and Voting Machines

October 20th, 2016

The Network for Responsible Public Policy hosted a lecture and Q&A on the topic of  American Elections: The Challenge of Dark Money and Voting Machines.
NetworkForResponsiblePublicPolicy-300x126The speakers discussed distinct challenges to the fairness and security of American elections and  how the integrity of our American electoral process is being challenged from both outside and inside the voting machine.  When large sums of dark money are funneled into state or local elections by special interests having an immediate economic stake in the outcome, the impact on state legislation and regulations can be even more influential than at the federal level. The speakers also discussed how the majority of voting machines in use today are perilously outdated, and their potential security and reliability flaws create significant risk of machine failures or loss of data.

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and the Department of Political Science and International Relations.