A special thank you to Professor Lee Pollock, Drew University  Biology Department, who originally sponsored and financed this project through his 1993 President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching.

Should You Attend Graduate School?

Since you are reading this, you are probably seriously considering going to graduate school. It may be because you want to learn more about a subject area or you recognize the need to earn an advanced degree in order to enter a particular field.

Your reasons for going should be your own! Graduate school is long and hard, financial support can be sparse, living conditions bleak, and ultimate career “pay-off” uncertain. In return, a graduate education can offer you a great deal of intellectual and personal satisfaction and challenge. It can lead to a career which provides you with greater financial rewards and gratification in your life’s work

Go to graduate school because you are committed to the idea yourself, not because someone else expects it of you.

Ask Yourself:

  • Why do I really want to attend graduate school?
  • What do I want to study?
  • What makes me an outstanding candidate?
  • Am I ready to go into a program that may take me 2 to 6 years to complete?
  • Could I get a personally fulfilling job in this field without further education?
  • Would I have a better idea about further education in this field if I worked first?
  • Do the students in the program I am interested in have work experience?
  • How will I finance graduate school?

Career Connections

A Graduate Degree May:

  • Provide advanced opportunities for creative expression in the arts or in research.
  • Open up new opportunities at higher levels of responsibility and pay scales in business, government, or industry.
  • Lead to positions as college faculty, school administrators, or staff members at institutions of higher education.
  • Permit entry into fields where credentials are defined primarily at graduate levels, such as in psychology, social work or library science.

This Guide

The purpose of this guide is to provide you with an overview of what is involved in the graduate school decision.

Hopefully, as you continue to read the sections of this guide, many of your questions about going to graduate school will be answered. You are fortunate to have an invaluable personal source of information in the Drew faculty and staff. They are more than willing to share their knowledge and insights about programs with you.

Additional resources are in the Career Center office.