Bighorn National Forest

During the Summer of 2005, Drew University students spent two months in northern Wyoming participating in archaeological fieldwork through the National Forest Service. Katie Caljean, Elizabeth Hill, David Marcus, Annie Peirce, and Ender Ricart learned to identify and document sites, artifacts, and features. Perhaps more importantly, the students learned the importance of Culture Resource Management and historic preservation.

Ngogo Field Site in Kibale National Park

During the Summer of 2005, Drew University student, Megan Wallner, studied at the Ngogo Field Site in Kibale National Park, Uganda with Professor Tammy Windfelder of Drew’s Biology Department. Megan performed playback experiments to examine polyspecific associations between red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius) and grey cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena). She learned field skills including behavioral sampling techniques, use of playback equipment, and how to follow a group of monkeys on her own. The Anthropology Department generously supported her field work in part with the William Yeack Scholarship in Anthropology

Mt. Trumbull, Arizona

During the Summer of 2005, Drew University student, Katie Caljean, participated in the Mt. Trumbull Prehistory Project in northern Arizona. She investigated Anasazi Basketmaker sites that were rich with Tusyan ceramics. Katie learned the methods of excavation and survey through hands on experience during her time at the Mt. Trumbull field school. The Anthropology Department generously supported her field work in part with the William Yeack Scholarship in Anthropology.