NOTE: General education requirements that are fulfilled through required coursework for the major are listed (not including the Writing in the Major and Capstone requirements). HOWEVER, remember that students’ five Breadth requirements must be met from at least four different departments. You should also let students know that there may be other general education requirements met through elective courses that count toward a major.

Anthropology (Major & Minor)

Prof. Allan Dawson, Chair

Anthropology is the study of humankind in cross-cultural and evolutionary perspectives. With one foot in the sciences (both social and biological) and the other in the humanities, anthropology takes a holistic approach to the study of humans and society through its traditional four sub-disciplines: cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistics. Course work in all four sub-fields is offered at Drew. Students may major or minor in anthropology. We also offer a minor in archaeology and a minor in linguistics.

ANTH 103 and ANTH 104 are prerequisites for courses in anthropology and archaeology and should be taken in the first year. Either course may be taken first.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Breadth Social Science, Breadth Interdisciplinary, Diversity International

Applied Performance (Minor Only)

Prof. Lisa Brenner and Prof. Chris Ceraso, Directors

Students interested in the Applied Performance minor can take THEA 135 during their first year. They can also enroll in DANC courses. 

Archaeology (Minor Only)

Prof. Maria Masucci, Anthropology, Director 

Archaeology is the study of human societies through time and across regions with a central focus on the recovery and analysis of the material remains of past societies. Archaeology offers a bridge between the social and physical sciences and the humanities. The minor provides a comprehensive program of method and theory in archaeology and examines human societies through time and across the globe. The minor is available to all students, regardless of major. In particular, students considering Art History, History, or Classics can benefit from the experiential components of archaeology courses.

Students considering an archaeology minor should take ANTH 103 during their first year.

Art (Major & Minor)

Prof. Claire Sherman, Chair
Students interested in pursuing the art major enroll in either 2D design or introductory drawing and then choose courses in painting, printmaking, ceramics, digital imaging, photography, video, animation, and sculpture. With departmental approval, students are encouraged to enroll in the senior thesis, which culminates in an exhibition prior to graduation. All students, preferably in their junior year, must enroll in the New York Semester on Contemporary Art and can consider an internship in a New York gallery or with a New York artist.

Students interested in Art should take ART 104 or ART 106 during their first-year. They might also consider a minor in Photography, Film Studies, or Art History.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Breadth Humanities, Writing Intensive (x1), Off-campus experience

Art History (Major & Minor)

Prof. Rita Keane, Chair

Art History is an exploration of the visual arts, past and present. It is an interdisciplinary field that explores the physical, cultural, political, psychological and/or economic contexts in which the work of art or architecture was made. Works of art and architecture are forms of communication that help us better understand history and culture as reflections of changing aesthetic and cultural attitudes. Through the study of Art History students learn to understand the visual and built world of the past, as well as how to navigate our increasingly visual contemporary society.

Students interested in majoring in Art History are encouraged to take ARTH 101 and/or ARTH 102 in their first year. First year students may enroll in 200 level Art History courses (or cross-listed Humanities courses). Students interested in an Art History major might also consider a minor in Art Administration and Museum Studies or Studio Art.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Breadth Humanities, U.S. Diversity, Diversity International, Writing Intensive (x2), Off-campus experience 

Arts Administration / Museum Studies (Minor Only)

Prof. James Bazewicz, Theatre & Dance, and
Prof. Margaret Kuntz, Art History, Co-Directors

Arts, anthropological, and historical organizations and museums require cadres of talented and dedicated individuals to carry out their cultural missions. This minor provides a focused liberal-arts foundation for those who would like to consider directions in museums, galleries, performing arts, and anthropological, historical, or other non-profit cultural organizations. The minor focuses on the interface of culture with societal issues and provides a starter set of analytic, critical, and communications skills. The New York metropolitan area provides access to many of the major cultural institutions in the country. Students interested in art, art history, theater, music, anthropology, history, Pan-African studies, Holocaust studies as well as other cultural arenas might consider this a beneficial minor.

Students should consider taking at least three courses from among the basic choices for the minor by the end of their sophomore year: ANTH 104, ARTH 101 or 102 (if the student wants to focus on Museum Studies), THEA 101, MUS 101 or 103 (if the student wants to focus on Performing Arts Administration), and/or ECON 101. Many of the courses also count toward General Education requirements, so students may make choices with that in mind.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Major & Minor)

Profs. Adam Cassano, Chemistry, and Steve Dunaway, Biology, Co-Directors

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is an interdisciplinary major that examines the chemistry of biological systems and chemical reactions within cells by using contemporary methods in biochemistry and molecular biology. Students graduating with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will have a strong foundation for entering health professional and graduate schools or industrial positions.

Students in their first year should plan to take BIOL 150 and CHEM 150/151 in the Fall semester and BIOL 160 and CHEM 160 in the Spring semester. Students with a strong background in science and math are encouraged to also take MATH 150 and MATH 151 during their first year.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Quantitative (x2), Writing Intensive (x2)

Biology (Major & Minor)

Prof. Steve Dunaway, Chair

Modern biology is an intricate and complex science that is difficult to cover adequately in a single year. Thus, the department has developed a three-semester sequence of courses that provides the background necessary for any student majoring in biology. Upon completing the sequence, biology majors are free to select, with the help of their advisors, the upper-level electives that suit their individual interests and needs.

Students interested in a Biology major should take BIOL 150 and CHEM 150/151 in the fall of their first year and BIOL 160 and CHEM 160 in the spring of their first year.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Quantitative (x2)

Business (Major & Minor)

Professor Marc Tomljanovich, Director

The interdisciplinary Business major requires students to take several introductory level courses, including ECON 101, ECON 102, MATH 117, BST 115, and at least one of the following: ANTH 104, HIST 102, PSCI 102/103/104, or PSYC 101. Any of these courses can be taken in the first few semesters, although it is generally not recommended for students to take MATH 117 as first semester students. ECON 101 and 102 are prerequisites for several other required core classes, as well as many of the electives in the major. Both are offered each semester and do not necessarily have to be taken in the fall of freshman year. ECON 101 does not have to be taken before ECON 102. There are also 100-level and 200-level BST elective courses that can be used to count toward the major.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Breadth Social Science, Quantitative (x2)

Chemistry (Major & Minor)

Prof. Ryan Hinrichs, Chair

Chemistry is the science of matter, its structure and its transformations. Because chemistry is widely applicable, from medicine to engineering to environmental science and beyond, an undergraduate degree in Chemistry allows a student to pursue many different career options touching on the sciences, including graduate/professional school, laboratory work, teaching, law school, and science writing. Course suggestions for three common “tracks” are given below.

  • Students with a general interest in Chemistry or in Environmental Chemistry should take CHEM 150/151 and MATH 150 in the Fall, and then CHEM 160/161 and MATH 151 in the Spring. Students with a very strong background in science and mathematics should consider taking PHYS 150 (Fall) and PHYS 160 (Spring) as well.
  • Students considering majoring in either Physics or Chemistry, or looking to pursue a Chemistry major and the 3/2 Engineering program should be strongly encouraged to take CHEM 150/151, MATH 150, and PHYS 150 in the Fall semester. Students with these interests who are uncomfortable taking Chemistry, Calculus, and Physics together should register for MATH 150 and PHYS 150 in the Fall.
  • Students with interests in the health professions or Biochemistry should register for CHEM 150/151, BIOL 150, and MATH 150. Students with these interests who are uncomfortable taking all three courses should register for CHEM 150/151 and BIOL 150 in the Fall.

Students who have earned a 5 on the Chemistry AP exam, a 6 or 7 on the IB Chemistry HL exam, or a grade of A in A-level Chemistry should be referred to the Chemistry Chair to discuss the possibility of enrolling in CHEM 250 (Organic Chemistry I).

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Quantitative (x2), Writing Intensive (x2)

Chinese Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. Bai Di, Chinese Studies, Coordinator 

Students interested in the Chinese Studies major should take the appropriate language course (by placement): CHIN 101/CHIN 105, CHIN 201, or CHIN 301.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Breadth Social Science, Foreign Language, Diversity International, Writing Intensive (x1)

Classical Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. John Muccigrosso, Chair

First-year students can enroll in 100- level or 200-level courses with a Classics designation. Students should take Latin for their foreign language and enroll in LAT 101 or 201 (by placement). Students placed in 102 may complete that course in the spring semester. (NOTE: The major requirements also offer Greek as a language option, but the teaching of Greek has been suspended.) There are also introductory-level and intermediate-level courses in ARTH, ENGL, HUM, and PHIL that count toward the major.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Foreign Language, Diversity International

Computer Science (Major & Minor)

Prof. Emily Hill, Director

In the computer science program at Drew, students experience innovation through computing. As part of the program students will have an opportunity to work on real software development projects with companies and on-campus partners. Some of our recent projects include automated trading and other applications for financial firms, web design and development, search engines, and tools for bioinformatics.

Students interested in computer science should begin by taking CSCI 150.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Quantitative (x2)

Creative Writing (Minor Only)

Prof. Neil Levi, English Department Chair

In addition to the creative writing emphasis in the English major, students also have the option of minoring in creative writing. Students from all disciplines are welcome and encouraged to take writing workshops and to declare the creative writing minor, although they do not have to be a minor to get into a workshop. Creative writing courses, offered in poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, are all upper-level; the first year writing class, the Drew Seminar, is a pre-requisite for all courses in the program, so students are eligible for creative writing courses as soon as they have completed that course. Students planning to do a minor or to take creative writing courses might consider an English course such as 150 or 102 in their first year, as reading a range of literary texts provides essential background for writers.

Dance (Minor Only)

Prof. Rosemary McLaughlin, Theatre & Dance, Director

The dance minor is dedicated to the study of dance in the context of a broad-based liberal arts education. The goal of the minor is to create well-rounded dance artists who are: effective collaborators, literate in the study of dance (written, verbal and in practical), and able to critically analyze dance performance. We strive to develop sensitive artists able to recognize some of the many influences that help to inform and shape dance today and who can incorporate these ideas into the creation of a dance piece. We feel that it is important to encourage students to explore these many aspects, intellectually and physically in a classroom setting and on-stage in performance.

Students interested in the Dance minor may enroll in DANC 220 (2 credits) or DANC 250 (2 credits). DANC 101 is offered in spring semesters.

Economics (Major & Minor)

Prof. Maliha Safri, Chair

Students should take ECON 101 and ECON 102 in their first year. These classes are prerequisites for most of the required core classes as well as many of the electives in the major. Both are offered each semester. ECON 101 does not have to be taken before ECON 102.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Social Science, Quantitative (x2)

English (Major & Minor)

Prof. Neil Levi, Chair

The English major offers students three emphases: Literature, Creative Writing, and Writing and Communication Studies. ENGH 150, Literary Analysis, is the gateway course for all three emphases and should be taken in the first year by any student who is considering an English major or minor. This course provides the foundation for the major by giving students practice in college-level close reading and textual analysis and also meets the humanities breadth requirement. Students who scored a 4 or 5 on the English Literature AP exam are not exempted from ENGH 150; the AP will count for 4 elective credits toward the major. Students planning on completing the Writing and Communication Studies emphasis should plan on taking ENGH 240, Introduction to Writing and Communication Studies, within their first two years, but should probably wait until after they have completed ENGH 150.

Prospective majors and minors may also take other English courses numbered 100-149 and 200-239 during the first year. These courses would apply as electives in the major.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities

Environmental Studies and Sustainability (Major & Minor)

Prof. Phil Mundo, Director

The Environmental Studies and Sustainability (ESS) program offers a major, a minor, and courses for non-majors interested in environmental issues. A Science Track is available within the ESS major, with slightly different requirements.

First-year students interested in ESS should take ESS 101 or BIOL 150. Those interested in the science track may also want to complete CHEM 150/151 in the fall semester and CHEM 160 in the spring semester.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Breadth Social Science, Breadth Interdisciplinary, Quantitative (x1)

Film Studies (Minor Only)

Prof. Shakti Jaising, English, Director

The Film Studies minor is an interdisciplinary minor that focuses on visual literacy and film analysis, history, theory, and production. The minor is designed for students interested in all film forms and is a good complement to majors in Media and Communications, English, Theatre Arts, or Art History, though it can be combined with any major. Students interested in pursuing the minor should begin with FILM 101/ENGH 120, Introduction to Film Analysis, which is offered every semester. This foundational course does not have to be taken in the first year.

French (Major & Minor)

Prof. Marie-Pascale Pieretti, Chair

In addition to introductory and intermediate level language courses, the department offers thematic courses with an interdisciplinary emphasis related to French and French-speaking literature, culture, and society. Some courses specifically develop language fluency through conversation practice, films and advanced language topics. All courses are taught in French unless otherwise indicated.

Students interested in the French major or minor should take the appropriate language course (by placement): FREN 101, FREN 102, or FREN 201. Students who place beyond the intermediate level should take FREN 302 or FREN 304.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Foreign Language, Diversity International, Writing Intensive (x1)

German Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. Joshua Kavaloski, Chair

Not only is German a key language for science, the humanities, and the arts, but Germany also has one of the four largest economies in the world. Drew’s German Studies program offers instruction of the highest quality, emphasizes innovative learning, and integrates language, literature, and culture. Drew’s proximity to New York City is important because the city contains one of the largest concentrations of German culture outside of Europe, and there are regular excursions to Manhattan to experience opera, classical music, art exhibitions, and restaurants.

Students interested in the German major or minor should take the appropriate language course (by placement): GERM 101 or GERM 201. Students who place into 102 should plan to take that course in the spring semester. Students who place beyond the intermediate level should take GERM 301.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Foreign Language, Writing Intensive (x1)

History (Major & Minor)

Prof. James Carter, Chair

History introduces students to the study of human experience in the past. Drew offers a broad range of courses in American, European and global history. Our students learn to locate original evidence, develop original arguments in response to the views of others, and use evidence to support one’s own interpretation of the past. The discipline provides outstanding training in analysis of social and political problems and issues, research techniques, and oral and written communication. Many students study history as excellent preparation for professional programs in law, teaching, or business; or careers in foreign or civil service; others regard history as an excellent liberal arts major that develops research and writing skills and hones critical thinking.

Students interested in the History major or minor should take HIST 101 or 102 and HIST 104 or 105 in the first year. Elective history courses numbered below 300 are open to first-year students, though students should be prepared for significantly more reading, writing and research papers in the intermediate, 200-level courses.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, U.S. Diversity

Humanities (Minor Only)

Prof. Marie-Pascale Pieretti, Director

The Humanities Program is an innovative interdisciplinary course of study, with attention to experiential learning. The Humanities curriculum gives students the opportunity to explore pivotal events and ideas in Western and world history, and to engage with cultural issues relevant to the present across academic disciplines. Students have found the breadth and depth of the Humanities Program Minor to be invaluable to contextualizing and complementing their major.

Students interested in the Humanities minor may take any course with a HUM designation.

International Relations (Major & Minor)

Prof. Carlos Yordan, Chair 

Students contemplating a major in International Relations should enroll in PSCI 102 or 104 during the first year. Note also that students must complete the equivalent of four semesters of foreign language for the major, so students may want to begin the foreign language sequence as early as possible.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Social Science

Italian Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. Emanuele Occhipinti, Coordinator

The major and minor provide opportunities for students to acquire both proficiency in the Italian language, and a good knowledge and appreciation of Italy’s rich cultural tradition. Courses (language, literature, culture, and cinema) are taught entirely in Italian, but we also offer courses in English on Italian culture and film.

Students interested in Italian should take the appropriate language course (by placement): ITAL 101 or ITAL 201. Students who place into 102 should plan to take that course in the spring semester. Students who place beyond the intermediate level may take 300-level ITAL courses.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Breadth Humanities, Breadth Interdisciplinary, Foreign Language, Diversity International, Writing Intensive (x1)

Jewish Studies (Minor Only)

Prof. Allan Nadler, Director

The Jewish Studies program at Drew offers a rich, interdisciplinary minor that investigates the religion, history, culture, literature, languages and 3,000-year civilization of the Jews. The Jewish Studies minor is available to all students, regardless of religious, ethnic, or educational background. It includes both the theological study of the Jewish religion and the critical historical study of the Jewish people, from biblical times to the modern era.

First-year students interested in the critical study of any aspect of Judaism and Jewish history are encouraged to take JWST 220. JWST 224 is also available to first-year students when it is offered.

Law, Justice, and Society (Minor Only)

Prof. Jinee Lokaneeta, Director

The Law, Justice and Society minor provides an interdisciplinary perspective on law. Students will study the complex ways in which law works in society and the integral relationship of law with justice. The law is not a tool or technique to be mastered and manipulated. Law emerges out of struggles over social, political and cultural values; law affects different communities differently; and law shapes society and is shaped by it. Students will become familiarized with law in different societies and will learn a holistic way of thinking about the interactions of law, justice and society that will serve them well whether they go into law or another field.

Students interested in the Law, Justice, and Society minor can take PSCI 211 during their first year, but do not necessarily have to do so.

Leadership for Social Action (Minor Only)

Prof. Amy Koritz, Director

Leadership for Social Action connects knowledge of the field of leadership studies with practical experience in the service of socially responsible action. This program seeks to educate leaders who understand the larger impact of their decisions and strive to combine personal goals and values with a commitment to the well-being and stewardship of society.

Students interested in this minor should begin by taking CE 250, which is offered every spring.

Linguistic Studies (Minor Only)

Prof. Elizabeth Kimball, Director

Students interested in the Linguistic Studies minor can take ANTH 104 during their first year. LING 101 is a required course as well, to be taken when offered.

Mathematics (Major & Minor)

Prof. Sarah Abramowitz, Chair

Mathematics, which is based on abstraction, logical argument, and an analytical approach to problems, lies at the heart of the liberal arts. Mathematics also finds ubiquitous application, from the natural sciences, through the social sciences and finance, to the humanities and the arts. Precise abstraction and quantification play an increasingly important role in these diverse areas and the study of mathematics can provide a foundation for any of them. Mathematics majors are in demand not only in scientific fields, but also in such areas as law and business, where clear thinking and analysis are indispensable.

Students interested in the Mathematics major or minor should take MATH 150 in their first semester. Proficiency in high-school algebra and trigonometry is expected of those enrolling in MATH 150 (a placement test will determine if students are ready for this course). Students with a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus AB exam or a 3 on the AP Calculus BC exam will receive credit for MATH 150 and should start with MATH 151 in the spring semester of their first year. Students with a 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC exam will receive credit for both MATH 150 and 151. These students should take MATH 250 and/or 310 in the fall semester of their first year.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Quantitative (x2)

Media & Communications (Major & Minor)

Prof. Lisa Lynch, Director

The media and communications program allows students to investigate the formative role of media and communication on identity, society and democratic processes, and emerge with the critical and practical skills necessary to navigate the rapidly changing world of media as citizens and as professionals. Students examine the structures and frameworks that shape media and communications, gain familiarity with debates surrounding ethics in media production and distribution, develop a broad understanding of media technologies, and take advantage of hands-on opportunities in a variety of media and professional experiences in a range of communications and media industry settings.

This is a highly interdisciplinary major with only four major-specific courses. The course that is appropriate for first-year students is Introduction to Media Studies (MCOM 101 or ENGH 121). If this course is full, students can also be encouraged to take introductory-level courses in Speech (SPCH 101), Linguistics (LING 101), Art (ART 104/120/130/220), Theatre (THEA 135), and Computer Science (CSCI 149/150) that count towards the major. Finally, some of the upper-level courses in other disciplines that can be applied to the major have discipline-specific prerequisites (e.g., SOC 101), so students should explore the full range of courses in the major and plan accordingly.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Breadth Interdisciplinary

Music (Major & Minor)

Prof. Jason Bishop, Chair

Students interested in Music as a major or a minor should take MUS 102 and 103 in their first year. First-year students may also take courses in music and culture (MUS 231-240); no prior musical experience or knowledge is required for these courses.

All interested students, regardless of intended major, are encouraged to contact the instructor of the performance ensembles/private lessons for further information on registration and, in some cases, auditions.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Breadth Humanities, Quantitative (x2)

Neuroscience (Major & Minor)

Prof. Graham Cousens, Psychology, Director

The neuroscience major at Drew is a multidisciplinary program of study that allows students to explore the brain from the perspectives of many different disciplines, including anthropology, biology, chemistry, computer science, physics, philosophy, and psychology.

Students wishing to major in Neuroscience should take NEUR 101 and CHEM 150/151 in the fall semester of their first year and BIOL 160 and CHEM 160 in the spring semester. Alternatively, students deciding among neuroscience, biology, and biochemistry & molecular biology may replace NEUR 101 with BIOL 150, PSYC 101, and PSYC 220 (adding 8 credits to the size of the Neuroscience major).

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science Breadth Interdisciplinary, Quantitative (x2)

Pan-African Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. Allan Dawson, Anthropology, Interim Director

Students who wish to pursue the major or minor in Pan-African studies may choose from a broad range of courses in English, history, humanities, anthropology, sociology, music, French, economics, religious studies, theatre, and political science that explore experiences of Africans and people of the African diaspora.

Students who intend to major or minor in this area should take PAST 101, which is offered in spring semesters, during their first year. Other courses that meet the elective requirements from the departments listed above can also be taken (ANTH 104 and PAST 201 would be good options).

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Interdisciplinary, Diversity International

Philosophy (Major & Minor)

Prof. Erik Anderson, Chair

To study philosophy is to embark on conceptual exploration. Philosophers seek rational answers to enduring questions about knowledge, reality, value, thought, and language. From the time of Socrates to the present day, philosophers have examined fundamental presuppositions of science, morality, governance, and art. Philosophy demands close thought. It fosters careful argumentation and clear writing.

First-year students interested in majoring or minoring in Philosophy should enroll in PHIL 101 or 104. PHIL 213 may also be taken by first-year students.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Quantitative (x1), Writing Intensive (x1)

Photography (Minor Only)

Prof. Rebecca Soderholm, Director

Students interested in the Photography minor can take ART 104 or 220 during their first year. They can also enroll in ART 130. As these are all very popular courses, the courses are often full. It’s not a problem to take these after the first year.

Physics (Major & Minor)

Prof. James Supplee, Chair

Physics encompasses the study of matter and radiation and is the fundamental science from which astronomy, engineering and many other applied sciences are built. Physicists develop mathematical models of natural processes and build experiments to test their ideas. These ideas span a wide range, from theories of the origins of the universe to the invention of materials for more efficient energy storage. An undergraduate degree in physics can be the gateway to many professions in addition to physics including law, medicine, engineering, education and neuroscience. Success in physics requires continued study in mathematics.

Students interested in Physics as a possible major must register for University Physics and Lab (PHYS 150 and PHYS 113) and for Calculus I (Math 150, by placement) in the first semester.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Natural Science, Breadth Interdisciplinary, Quantitative (x2), Writing Intensive (x1)

Political Science (Major & Minor)

Prof. Carlos Yordan, Chair 

Students contemplating a major in Political Science may enroll in any of four introductory courses: PSCI 102, 103, 104, or 105. Majors must eventually complete all four of the introductory courses, although PSCI 255 can substitute for PSCI 105.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Social Science

Psychology (Major & Minor)

Prof. Hilary Kalagher, Chair 

Students planning to major in psychology are encouraged to take PSYC 101, PSYC 110, and MATH 117 during their first three semesters. PSYC 101 must be taken before PSYC 110, and PSYC 110 and MATH 117 should be taken concurrently. MATH 117 has no prerequisites, and students must obtain a C- or higher for this course to meet the requirements of the Psychology major or minor; this is not a course that is generally recommended for first semester students. These courses are offered in both the fall and spring semesters, and are prerequisites for PSYC 211, which should be taken by the end of the second year.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Social Science, Breadth Interdisciplinary, Quantitative (x2)

Public Health (Minor)

Prof. Jonathan Reader, Director

The Public Health minor is a multidisciplinary program that bridges the biomedical sciences, social sciences, and humanities. It offers a population-level approach (as contrasted with the individual patient-centered approach of clinical medicine) to solving health problems with a strong focus on scientific, social, and ethical principles. International health is central to this program, as health in today’s world must be understood in global context. Public health’s focus historically was and still is on the prevention of diseases, disabilities, and disorders through a variety of means including health education.

Students pursuing the Public Health minor may enroll in PH 102, PH 201, or in other courses that are prerequisites to courses that count toward the minor (such as ANTH 104 or SOC 101).

Comparative Religion (Major & Minor)

Questions can be directed to any member of the department

Comparative Religion majors are historians, ethicists, cultural analysts, and/or global comparativists, depending on their choice of courses for concentration in the major or minor. The department offers courses exploring religious beliefs and practices, religion and culture, history of religions, comparative religion, and case studies in applied ethics. The department is especially noted for its commitment to the study of religion in global context, with experts in the study of Africa (traditional religions, Christianity, Islam), America (applied ethics), Asia (Buddhism, Hinduism), Europe (Christianity, Judaism), and the Middle East (Islam).

First-year students are strongly encouraged to explore their interest in the study of religion by taking REL 101 in the spring semester. Courses that introduce specific religions or ethics are also available to first-year students: REL 211/212, 220, 234/235, 250, 260/270.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, U.S. Diversity, Diversity International

Russian (Minor)

Prof. Carol Ueland, Coordinator

Students interested in the Russian minor should take the appropriate language course (by placement): RUSS 101/RUSS 103 or RUSS 201. Students who place into 102 should plan to take that course in the spring semester. Non-language intermediate-level RUSS courses are also open to first-year students.

Spanish (Major & Minor)

Prof. Monica Cantero-Exojo, Chair 

The Spanish program incorporates knowledge of Spanish language, culture, linguistics, and literature. To encourage mastery of the spoken language, Drew faculty conduct all courses in Spanish using the latest learning techniques in foreign language acquisition, and make extensive use of technology. In addition to choosing Spanish as a single major, many students recognize the practical use of Spanish in today’s world and combine a major or minor in Spanish with another field, such as political science, sociology, history, psychology, anthropology, or economics.

Students interested in the Spanish major or minor should take the appropriate language course (by placement): SPAN 101, SPAN 102, or SPAN 201. Students who place beyond the intermediate level will have the foreign language requirement met, but should take SPAN 301, 303, 306, 308, or 310 by placement.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Humanities, Foreign Language, U.S. Diversity, Writing Intensive (x1)

Sociology (Major & Minor)

Prof. Jonathan Reader, Chair

Crime, health care, families, gender, race and ethnicity, education, mental health, and social change – today’s sociologists study all of these topics. Our students use sociology to prepare for a variety of careers. Many go into service professions; others go on to graduate or law school. Sociology provides an excellent background for those who want to work in people-oriented professions.

Students interested in majoring or minoring in Sociology should take SOC 101 in their first year.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Social Science, U.S. Diversity, Quantitative (x2)

Theatre Arts (Major & Minor)

Prof. James Bazewicz, Chair

Students interested in majoring or minoring in Theatre Arts are encouraged to take the following courses in their first year, all of which are requirements for the major: THEA 101, 120, and 135. The department also offers Dance courses and Speech courses that can be completed in the first year. Students are encouraged to discuss their potential major with the department chair as early as possible to plan for sequencing of courses.

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Arts, Quantitative (x1), Writing Intensive (x1)

Women’s and Gender Studies (Major & Minor)

Prof. Wendy Kolmar, Director

The Women’s and Gender Studies major and minor focus on the construction of gender and on the diverse experiences of women as they are shaped by race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, religion and nationality. Through four interdisciplinary core courses offered by the program and courses selected from across the disciplines, majors and minors explore global and local feminisms from theoretical and applied perspectives as well as scholarship by and about women and gender. The women’s and gender studies minor is designed both for students interested in the interdisciplinary study of gender and to provide appropriate theoretical background for those who wish to pursue the study of gender in a discipline.

Students interested in pursuing a major should plan to take WGST 101 during the spring of their first year; minors should plan to take WGST 101 during the spring of their first or second year. Majors and minors should also consider taking some of the prerequisite courses for advanced courses that are cross-listed in the program (e.g., PSYC 101, PSCI 104, SOC 101, ECON 101 or 102).

Gen Ed requirements that are met through REQUIRED major courses: Breadth Interdisciplinary, U.S. Diversity, Diversity International, Off-campus experience, Writing Intensive (x1)

Writing and Communications Studies (Minor Only)

Prof. Neil Levi, English Department Chair 

Writing and communication studies is both an emphasis in the English major and a stand-alone minor. In their first year, students planning to minor in Writing and Communication Studies may take one of the 100- or 200-level courses that count toward the minor, such as ENGH 121, Introduction to Media Studies, or ENGH 244, Introduction to Journalism. Minors should plan to have taken ENGH 240, Introduction to Writing and Communication Studies, by the end of their sophomore year.