Message from the Chief

Dear Students and Parents, Drew University, the “University in the Forest,” is dedicated to providing its students with a safe and secure environment in which to pursue their educational goals. One of the major reasons for Drew’s excellent record is its location. Madison enjoys one of the lowest crime rates in New Jersey. But the primary reason is the ongoing cooperation between the University community and the Department of Public Safety.

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for providing an environment that is safe for all members of the Drew community. This responsibility includes crime prevention, fire safety, and educating students about how they can contribute to a safe campus. Every member of the Drew community must share the responsibility for maintaining a safe and secure campus.

This report and website provides basic information on how to keep safe and the many campus and off-campus resources available to students and staff. It also includes Drew University’s Annual Security Report and Annual Fire Safety Report, which are required to be made publicly available by federal law. That law, the Campus Security Act, also known as the Clery Act, requires institutions of higher education to compile statistics regarding reports of a variety of criminal offenses and to make those statistics publicly available for review in the form of an Annual Security Report.

In 2013, the federal government required institutions of higher education to meet new standards for dealing with sexual harassment and misconduct, to institute new training and prevention programs, and to track additional categories of hate crimes. That law, the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, becomes effective in October, 2014. But the Department of Education has asked schools to make a good-faith effort to compile and report statistics regarding those new categories of offenses for the calendar year 2013. This Report seeks to meet these new requirements and includes both the newly required policy statements and the statistical reports.

Those statistics and statistics for the past three years may be found at the end of this Report for those specified offenses that were reported to have occurred on campus, in or on off-campus buildings, or on property owned or controlled by the school, and on public property, within or immediately adjacent to the campus. Again, with respect to the new categories of offenses, Drew has made a good faith effort to report such offenses for the calendar year 2013.

The required statistics are prepared and maintained by the Department of Public Safety in a crime log that is publicly available for review at headquarters. The Drew Daily Crime Log is updated to include offenses within two days of the report of an offense and is available during business hours for review at the Drew Department of Public Safety. The Report also includes:

  • a description of the school’s timely warning process and notices for crimes that pose an immediate and/or ongoing threat to students and employees,
  • definitions of specified criminal offenses under state and federal law,
  • descriptions of the Drew’s alcohol and drug policies, and
  • descriptions of a variety of safety oriented policies, procedures, training and prevention programming.

The Annual Security Report is available on the Department of Public Safety webpage or at www.drew.edu/safety/statistics. Sincerely, Robert C. Lucid Director of Public Safety Phone: (973) 408-3379

Organization of Report

This report is organized into the following sections:

About the Department of Public Safety

The Department of Public Safety consists of a Director, 12 Patrol Officers, 4 Dispatchers, and one Administrative Assistant and provides 24-hour-a-day service to the Drew community.  We can be contacted at: (973) 408-3379. Our responsibilities include crime prevention and investigation, fire safety, traffic regulation, enforcement of university regulations and state and local laws on the Drew campus and Drew property. Professionally trained men and women patrol the campus in marked patrol cars, on foot and on bicycles. While officers do receive law enforcement training, they do not serve as commissioned police officers and do not have the arrest authority of sworn police officers. Officers are certified in:

  • CPR
  • Emergency Response
  • Emergency Medical Technician Training
  • Defibrillation

Patrol Officers within the department are required to complete a basic training course provided by New Jersey police academies. In addition to this training, officers continually receive in-service training and attend special training sessions provided by county and state police academies. Since 2002, all officers are trained as National Registry EMTs or as Emergency First Responders. One or more officers are certified to teach Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) classes, NJ Defensive Driving classes, and are certified by the American Red Cross as CPR instructors. Periodically throughout the academic year we offer such classes free of charge or for a nominal fee to Drew community members. The philosophy of this Department is based on a commitment to serve the Drew community. Members of the Department are sensitive to the special needs of students, as well as their responsibility to provide a secure living environment. Since the campus also falls under the law enforcement jurisdiction of the Madison Police Department, Drew’s Department of Public Safety works in close cooperation with the Madison Police concerning certain criminal investigations, traffic accidents or other police matters. Under the direction of the Madison Chief of Police, cooperation between Madison Police and the University is consistently excellent. Uniform crime reporting and some criminal investigations are handled by the Madison Police Department. The Department of Public Safety strives to serve the Drew community. Our headquarters is located in the Pepin Service Building. We encourage you to visit anytime.

Staff Listing

  • Chief of Public Safety, Robert C. Lucid
    • Administrative Assistant, Judi Rosenbaum
  • Operations Lieutenant, Fabio G. LaManna
    • Sergeant, Carol Simmons
    • Sergeant, Jordan Mitchell Jr.
    • Sergeant, Jesse Traynor
    • Sergeant, Timothy Goldate
      • Patrol Officer, Daniel O’Keefe
      • Patrol Officer, Edward O’Donnell
      • Patrol Officer, Lusian Bozo
      • Patrol Officer, Michael Doyle
      • Patrol Officer, Kimberly Garcia
      • Patrol Officer, Kevin Herbert
      • Patrol Officer, Nicole Fierro
      • Patrol Officer, Meredith Palmer
        • Communications Officer,  Gerard Ramos
        • Communications Officer, Daniel Fucito
        • Communications Officer, Shirley Dong
        • Communications Officer, Aurthor Herring

Reporting Crimes and Emergencies

If you are a victim of a crime, your first priority should be to get to a place of safety and to immediately seek assistance. Criminal offenses, suspected criminal activity, or other emergencies can be reported directly to the Department of Public Safety Department, as well as to the Madison Police Department. In most circumstances, reporting to the Drew Department of Public Safety will provide a swifter response because Department is more familiar with campus geography and locations. The Department ofPublic Safety can be contacted for emergencies at: (973) 408-4444; or 4444 (on-campus). Non-emergencies can be reported at: (973) 408-3379; or at 3379 (on-campus). Drew Public Safety can also accept reports through the Tipline at: (973) 408-5656. Reports may also be sent to the Drew University Public Safety email at: safety@drew.edu

Law Enforcement Support and Resources

The University strongly encourages anyone who has been the victim of a crime to report the matter immediately to law enforcement. If requested, the Department of Public Safety will assist you in making a report. Local and county law enforcement may be contacted at:

  • The Madison Police Department can be contacted at: (973)-593-3000 or 9-1-1 (emergency).
  • The Morris County Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) can be contacted at (973)-285-2900.

Addressing Sexual Misconduct

Over the course of the last several years, increasing attention has been focused on sexual misconduct on campuses across the country. Consistent with its community and institutional values, Drew has instituted a variety of training and prevention programs, as well as measures to investigate and adjudicate allegations of sexual misconduct. These programs and procedures are described in more detail in a separate section later on in this document. If you have been the victim of sexual misconduct, Drew will provide support, counseling, and other resources and will take actions to address that misconduct. You are also strongly encouraged to report sexual crimes to the Madison Police Department and the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office’s Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner and Sexual Assault Response Team (SANE/SART) Program. These resources can provide important assistance in preserving evidence, as well as counseling and support services. More information about the variety of options for reporting sexual harassment and misconduct and available resources and support services both on-campus and off-campus, as well as contact information, can be found in the Sexual Harassment and Misconduct section below.

Safety Escorts

The Department of Public Safety also provides safety escorts on request for students, faculty and staff during evening hours. Transportation to and from classes can also be provided to students in need of assistance as an accommodation. To obtain a safety escort, contact the Drew Department of Public Safety at: 4444(on-campus).

Emergency Response Notification

The Drew Public Safety Chief or designee will determine whether there is an ongoing or continuing immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees, either on-campus or off-campus. This determination will be made upon verification that a legitimate emergency or dangerous situation exists, including, if possible, confirmation of the scope and nature of the emergency, by the Drew Department of Public Safety Chief, or designee. This judgment will also be made taking into consideration the safety of the campus community and whether a notification could compromise efforts to assist a victim or contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate an emergency. Once confirmed, a campus-wide emergency notification and/or timely warning will be issued, utilizing Drew’s emergency text, voice and/or email notification procedures to alert students, faculty, and staff. Determination of the content of the notification, including what information will be disclosed at any given point in time and any required actions (such as evacuate to a safe location, shelter in place away from windows, secure entrances, secure residence halls and/or administrative or other campus facilities), as well as whom to notify, will be made by Drew Public Safety. The actual launch of the notification will normally be the responsibility of the Director of Communications Department, in consultation with Drew Public Safety. In the event, that the Director is unavailable, that responsibility will lie, in descending order, with the Dean of Students, the Vice President of Campus Life and Student Affairs, the Director of Residence Life and Community Standards. Students, faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to sign-up to receive emergency notifications by entering their telephone numbers in the Emergency Notification section of the Drew homepage at: www.drew.edu/Treehouse The Emergency Notification System allows for up to two phone numbers, cell or land lines, to be entered by every student or member of the community. This information, along with the assigned Drew e-mail account, is utilized by the Blackboard Connect system to provide notification, as appropriate to the device selected, via text messages, email and phone calls to registered individuals within the University community. Additionally, non-University visitors may be notified via public address announcements issued by the Department of Public Safety via speakers in the Ehinger Student Center. The Drew Communications Office posts messages concerning emergencies to the University website. In the event an incident occurs that may affect the surrounding community, area residents around Madison receive emergency notifications via the Nixle communications system controlled by Madison Police Department. Drew community members may sign up for Nixle notification at: www.Nixle.com.

Timely Warning

The Department of Public Safety will issue a timely warning for the specified crimes that occur on-campus or immediately adjacent to the campus, or on longer-term University rented property that is reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies, and is considered by Drew to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees. Again, Drew’s emergency notification system will be utilized for the issuance of these warnings.

Emergency Response Plan

The University’s Emergency Response Plan includes information about: Incident Teams; University operating status parameters; incident priorities and performance expectations; shelter-in-place and evacuation guidelines; and local contingency and continuity planning requirements. Individual University Departments and offices are responsible for developing contingency plans and continuity of operations plans for their staff and areas of responsibility. The University conducts emergency response exercises each year, including table top exercises, field exercises, and tests of the emergency notification systems on campus. These tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution. Drew University Public Safety has received training in Incident Command and Responding to Critical Incidents on Campus. When a serious incident occurs that causes an immediate threat to the campus, the first responders to the scene are usually Drew Public Safety, the Madison Police Department and Madison Fire and Emergency Medical Services. Typically, these resources will respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the nature of the incident, other Drew resources and State, county, local or federal agencies could also be involved in any response to an incident. The Drew Department of Public Safety, in cooperation with local law enforcement and fire authorities, has also designed a set of standard operating procedures to guide Drew’s response to serious, immediate threats on-campus, including an active shooter. The objectives are to minimize the risk to uninvolved students, faculty and staff; clear the area; and assist local authorities in resolving the situation. Chief Lucid has conducted training sessions for resident directors and assistants, and will be holding sessions for faculty and staff. This plan, including an active shooter plan, has been added to the University’s Emergency Response Manual, which contains response procedures for a wide range of scenarios. The University’s Department of Public Safety maintains this manual and reviews it regularly with other administrative departments throughout the year to anticipate and respond to emergency management issues. Drills to test and evaluate emergency response and evacuation procedures are conducted on an annual basis.

Basic 9-1-1 Dispatch & Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD)

All officers and dispatchers are trained as Basic 9-1-1 Emergency Tele-Communicators and as Emergency Medical Dispatchers.  We dispatch our own emergency response units to calls received on campus and communicate with outside response units for coordinated response, including Advanced Life Support.

Security Information: Facilities

Inspections/Health and Safety

In order to maintain a healthy, safe environment in the residence halls, room inspection are conducted by Student Life staff and Facilities staff several times during a semester. Fines are imposed for violations that can cause fire or are fire hazards, including possession of party lights, candles or prohibited electrical appliancesas well as for other infractions. Violations observed in plain view, including alcohol in a room whose occupants are underage, a prohibited pet, or drugs can result in charges. Fines may be imposed for fire or safety infractions.

Access to Campus and Facilities

The Drew Campus is open to students, families, and their guests. Guests must report into Public Safety. Student overnight guests must be registered with Student Life. Guest vehicles entering the campus after 7 PM are required to register with Public Safety. During non-working hours, access to administrative and academic buildings will be limited. Some facilities, including athletic, library, and creative art, will have extended hours based on the nature of the use of that facility. Drew reserves the right to require guests or visitors to leave campus.

Residence Halls

Residence halls are accessed by key card system or key. During breaks, non-occupied halls are locked. Access to residential halls is restricted to residents and their guests. Non-student guests must be signed in by their hosts. Only University personnel or contractors under supervision by Drew employees on assigned duties will be permitted to enter.

Buildings and Grounds

Drew Buildings and Grounds can be contacted at: 973-408-3510.                .

Prohibited Items/Residence Halls

To protect the health and welfare of the University community, the following articles are prohibited in residence halls:

  • Firearms and objects of all kinds with the potential to cause bodily harm, including (but not limited to) guns, BB guns, knives, bows and arrows, paintball guns, and martial arts equipment
  • Fireworks, explosives, incense, candles; volatile liquids and substances of any kind, including (but not limited to) fuels, lighter fluid, open cans of paint, paint thinner, and turpentine
  • Extension cords or “outlet expanders” (with the exception of surge protectors); surge protectors are allowed, but one may not be plugged into another.
  • Decorative lighting (such as holiday lights, neon signs, paper lamps)
  • Halogen lamps
  • Illegal or non-prescribed drugs and drug paraphernalia
  • Hookahs
  • Kegs, beer balls, and other alcoholic beverages in bulk quantities. Empty containers, funnels, or other paraphernalia used for bingeing purposes will be considered illegal also and owners/room occupants are subject to fines.
  • Motorcycles, mopeds, or motor bikes
  • Any appliance exceeding 500 watts (except hair dryers used in bathroom facilities)
  • Refrigerators with built-in taps and/or internal dimensions larger than 4 cu. ft. or starting current exceeding 7 amps. Each resident may have one small refrigerator.
  • Microwave ovens, microwave-refrigerator combo (other than University-issued), hot plates, deep-fat fryers, toasters, open-flame or open-coil appliances, George Foreman grills, waffle irons, quesadilla makers, and hot pots
  • Air conditioners, space heaters, ceiling fans, washing machines, dryers, freezers, or other high-voltage equipment
  • Waterbeds, pools
  • Pets, except for non-meat-eating fish
  • University furniture other than that provided at the beginning of the year
  • Unapproved lofts
  • Alcohol if under the age of 21
  • Items on exterior window ledges
  • Weight-lifting equipment of more than 20 lbs.
  • Rollerblades, scooters, bicycles, etc. riding in hallways
  • Hall sports (i.e. catch played in the hallways)
  • Water balloons and snowballs inside the halls

Security Awareness for Students and Employees: Programs to Help

Staying Safe and Secure

Property thefts and vandalism are a continuing problem on college campuses, and one which will not be easily solved. But you can help by becoming aware of crime prevention and security measures. The following suggestions are offered to help protect yourself and your property:

  • Never leave purses, keys, backpacks or other personal property unattended in offices, dining areas, classrooms or the library.
  • Lock your room, apartment or office door even if you “just step out for a minute.”
  • Don’t leave valuables, purses, or money in plain view in parked vehicles.
  • Participate in operation identification by engraving your driver’s license number on your valuables. Contact the Department of Public Safety at 973-408-3379.
  • If you see suspicious persons or activity in or around university buildings, call Public Safety at x3379.
  • Remember the tips line for leaving confidential information: Tips hotline: x5656
  • Report any criminal activity as soon as possible! Timely information helps in our investigations.

Campus Safety Seminars

Drew Department of Public Safety officers are available to speak to any concerned individuals or groups at any time. Meetings are often scheduled through resident assistants early in the academic year to help create campus safety awareness and answer questions. Periodically throughout the academic year, officers hold classes for Drew community members. These include Defensive Driving, Fire Safety, and Rape Aggression Defense. These classes are taught by officers carrying all necessary instructor certifications. Classes are open to all community members and are free of charge (with the exception of any fees required by outside agencies providing attendance certification).

Drew University C.E.R.T. Team

Drew University CERT instructors have trained over 40 community members to be certified as a C.E.R.T. team. The Community Emergency Response Team can come together to help in times of disaster or any type of emergency. Drew’s instructor is Corporal Traynor. For more information contact the Department of Public Safety between 9am – 5pm Monday – Friday.

Community First Aid & C.P.R.

The Department has two officers certified by the Red Cross to instruct basic first aid and C.P.R. (cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation) and Automatic Electric Defibrillators. Upon successful completion of this class, participants will be able to perform Adult, Child and infant C.P.R. and assist someone in a medical emergency until help arrives.  We have initiated a student organized Drew First Responder Club that rides and responds to medical emergencies on campus on weekend nights.

Defensive Driving Course

The department has two officers certified by the New Jersey Safety Council to instruct an eight hour course in Defensive driving. The course includes reviewing some rules of the road that they have learned before and some that are not known. The instructors also give tips for foul weather driving and other driving hazards. People that complete this course will receive at least a 5 % discount and can get 2 points off of your record.

Bicycle Patrol Unit

The Drew University Department of Public Safety has always been on the cutting edge of new technology and patrol methods. Whether it’s with state of the art equipment or our inherent desire to serve the Drew community as best we can, it is our philosophy that officers in the field should be as approachable as possible. One of the latest and most effective ways of achieving this goal is by placing patrol officers on bicycles. This hands-on approach to patrol has many advantages, including easier interaction with members of the public and access to areas not usually accessible by vehicle. Community policing studies have also shown that members of the public are more inclined to approach an officer on a bicycle than in a vehicle when they have a problem.

The Bike Owner’s Survival Guide

Bike theft is the fastest growing crime at college campuses across the country. With costs of bikes often ranging between $400 and $600, students lose thousands of dollars’ worth of property to bike thieves each year. This page is intended to give you the “street smarts” to avoid being a victim. Bike thefts on the Drew campus usually fall into one of four categories:

  • The unlocked bike of questionable value that is “borrowed” for a quick means of transportation and the “borrower” forgets to return it.
  • The bike locked with an inexpensive lock that the thief cuts with bolt cutters. The bike is then ridden away and probably sold for a fraction of its cost.
  • The expensive mountain bike, locked to itself with a good lock, which is carried to a waiting car. The thief then cuts the lock with a torch and sells the bike at “low overhead” sale prices.
  • The unlocked bike that is left around, which can quickly be ridden away or thrown into car.

Safety and Security: Training

Students are advised during orientation of the services offered by Drew Public Safety, as well as by the Madison Police Department. During the academic year, Public Safety, in cooperation with other organizations and departments, present climate prevention awareness sessions on sexual assault, date rape drugs, theft and vandalism, as well as educational sessions on personal safety and residence hall security. Public Safety encourages students and employees to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others while on campus and to be alert to, and report, criminal offenses or suspicious activity. In addition, information is disseminated through crime prevention awareness packets, security alert posters, displays and articles, and advertisements in the Acorn. When time is of the essence, information is released to the University community through security alerts utilizing text messages, email, and telephone.

Missing Student Notification Policy

Each student living in on-campus student housing has the option to register a confidential contact person to be notified in the case that the student is determined to be missing, and that authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers may have access to this information. The University will request of students each year that they provide, on a voluntary basis, contact information in the event that the student would be reported officially missing during his or her tenure at the University. Please complete the Emergency Contact Registration form and identify whom you would like to be notified in the event you are reported missing. If a Drew student is suspected missing, immediately contact the Department of Public Safety at ext. 3379 or from any off-campus phone at (973) 408-3379. Students can also contact for follow-up and report, after the initial call is made to Public Safety.

  • Robert C. Lucid, Chief, Public Safety, 3379
  • Sara Waldron, Vice President of Campus Life and Student Affairs, ext. 3390
  • Frank Merckx, Dean of Students, ext 3390

All reports of missing persons made to Public Safety are followed up with an on-going investigation, per standard operating procedures. If it is determined by Public Safety that a student for whom a missing person report has been filed has been missing for more than 24 hours, then within the next 24 hours the university will:

  • Notify the individual identified by the student as the missing person contact; Students can designate an emergency contact person by completing an Emergency Contact Registration form;
  • If the student is under 18 years old and not emancipated, the university will notify a parent or guardian, as required by law; and;
  • The university will notify appropriate law enforcement officials, even if the student has not registered a contact person.

Information about New Jersey’s Sex Offender Laws and Registries

In New Jersey, the Division of State Police administers New Jersey’s sex offender registry. Information about New Jersey’s Sex Offender laws, known as Megan’s Law, and how to obtain information from the State’s sex offender registry, including notification regarding Tier I and Tier II sex offenders can be found at:

Megan’s Law itself can be accessed at: http://www.nj.gov/njsp/spoff/megans_law.html The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act and the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offenders Act track convicted sex offenders and requires state law enforcement agencies to provide Drew with a list of registered sex offenders with an indication that they are either enrolled, an employee, or carrying on avocation at Drew University. When made available, to Drew, such list will be maintained and available at the Department of Public Safety. Unlawful use of sex offender information is prohibited under State law.

Relationship with Local Law Enforcement

Drew works closely with local law enforcement and, consistent with the requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, will comply with subpoenas and court orders for the production of records and other information requested by law enforcement. At present, Drew University does not have a written Memorandum of Understanding with local law enforcement agencies. Drew Public Safety meets regularly with the Madison Police Department and periodically with the Morris County Prosecutors Office. Madison Police have law enforcement jurisdiction over the Drew campus, and, on occasion, Drew will request their assistance, including in making arrests.

Fire Safety

Fire Alarms and Procedures

Smoke detectors, heat sensors, carbon monoxide sensors, sprinklers and fire extinguishers have been strategically placed in all residence halls to protect life and property. Drew’s alarm system is monitored 24 hours a day. In response to an alarm, Public Safety personnel will be dispatched and attempt to respond immediately to any alarm condition. Drew values your privacy as well as your safety. Every attempt will be made to turn off the alarms as soon as it has been ascertained that no danger exists. The Madison Fire Department and/or other available local resources will respond to all alarms within Residence Halls and are contacted by Drew Public Safety and/or the Central Fire Safety Company upon verification of an emergency. Vandalizing the alarm system, covering smoke detectors, disabling fire sensors, or illegally discharging fire extinguishers are serious offenses. Every effort will be made to identify persons who compromise public safety through such acts. Offenders will be referred to the Dean of Students for appropriate disciplinary action and/or to local law enforcement. In compliance with State regulations, during each academic year the Department of Public Safety and the Office of Residence Life conduct two fire drills in all residential buildings and two fire drills in all administrative buildings requiring complete evacuation.

Fire Alarm Evacuation Policy

Drew expects all individuals to immediately evacuate buildings when the fire alarm is sounding. Failure to leave the building during a fire alarm constitutes disregarding a University directive and may result in disciplinary action. When an alarm is activated, you must act as if it is a real alarm. You should not and cannot assume that, in any given instance, the sounding of an alarm is a drill or a false alarm. Keep calm and move safely to the nearest exit. You should wait outside the building, at a safe distance, and should not re-enter it until an all clear is sounded and you are given permission. If you have information about the source of the fire, or other students or persons who may be in danger, please provide that information immediately to the emergency responders or to Drew Public Safety. Additionally, if you observe suspicious behavior or criminal conduct, you should report that to Drew Public Safety.

Fire Safety Training

Fire safety training includes graphic video depictions of common sources of fire and the aftermath in residence residence rooms, as well as the appropriate prevention steps to prevent fires in housing. Additionally, campus regulations concerning prohibited items, smoking, cooking, fire alarms and evacuations are explained. All incoming CLA students are required to attend fire training during New Student Orientation. Resident Assistants are trained twice annually in conjunction with Drew Public Safety and local fire resources. Training for Graduate and Theological takes place by Residence Hall. Fire safety equipment and availability is likewise explained and is also posted in Daniel’s Dictionary, the student handbook.

Campus Fire Safety Right to Know Act

This 2008 law requires institutions of higher education to publicly report fire safety information and statistics. Drew’s report, including fire statistics on campus residences and evacuation procedures, is available at the Public Safety dispatch center. Fire procedures can be accessed at www.Drew.edu/safety.

Sexual Harassment and Misconduct

University Policy prohibits sexual harassment and misconduct. In response to reports of sexual harassment and misconduct, the University will initiate a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation of any report of sexual harassment, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault and will provide effective and reliable processes and procedures for seeking remedies, while affording those accused of violations a fair opportunity to be heard..

Drew’s Sexual Harassment and Misconduct Policy

Drew’s Sexual Harassment and Misconduct Policy prohibits sexual harassment and misconduct. The current Policy can be found at: https://uknow.drew.edu/confluence/display/Handbook/Sexual+Harassment+and+Misconduct+Policy Frequently Asked Questions related to the Policy can be accessed at: https://uknow.drew.edu/confluence/display/Handbook/Frequently+Asked+Questions+-+Sexual+Harassment+and+Misconduct Drew’s Policy prohibits the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Drew’s Procedures describing the internal administrative process for handling complaints and reports of sexual harassment and misconduct and can be accessed at: https://uknow.drew.edu/confluence/display/Handbook/Sexual+Harassment+and+Misconduct+Procedures+-+Students Notifications describing how to report complaints and summarizing Drew’s internal administrative procedures will also be made available to complainants and those who are accused.

Reporting Sexual Harassment and Misconduct

Complaints of sexual harassment and misconduct, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault, involving a student should be reported internally to the Title IX Coordinator, Campus Life and Student Affairs (CLSA) professional staff, the Public Safety Department, or to the e-mail hotline: investigations@drew.edu. Names and contact information for these and other contacts and resources, including law enforcement, are listed on the Support and Resources page below or at: https://uknow.drew.edu/confluence/display/Handbook/Sexual+Harassment+and+Misconduct+Procedures+-+Students Written descriptions of how to report offenses, Drew’s internal conduct procedures, and available counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other support services, as well as information about interim measures and other sanctions, will be provided to those reporting sexual misconduct. Drew will attempt to provide a fair and impartial process, within reasonably prompt time lines, conducted by individuals with training, with notice, based on a preponderance of the evidence standard. Parties will be permitted to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice, without voice, will receive notification of results at the same time, and will have the opportunity to appeal based on new information or substantially prejudicial procedural error. Typically, fact-finding will be conducted by investigators who will interview parties and witnesses and gather other pertinent information, prepare a fact-finding summary for consideration by the administrative meeting officer, and which may be reviewed by the parties in advance. An administrative meeting will then be conducted separately for each party, resulting in a determination of responsible or not responsible, subject to appeal as described above. Drew University strongly encourages victims of sexual offenses to report those offenses to the Madison Police Department or the Morris County Prosecutors Office, and staff, if requested, will provide assistance in making such reports or contacts. There is, however, no obligation to make such reports.

What to do after a sexual assault:

If you are a victim of a sexual assault at Drew, your first priority should be your safety. If there is still a potential ongoing threat, contact Public Safety or Madison Police and get to a safe location. You should then seek necessary medical treatment. Public Safety can assist you, or you can contact Health Services during business hours. You are also encouraged to report offenses in a timely manner. Time is a critical factor when collecting and preserving evidence. The Madison Police Department and the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office’s Sexual Assault Response Team can provide important information and assistance in preserving evidence, including taking those steps necessary to preserve direct and intimate physical evidence, which should be done as soon after an incident as possible. You should take all steps to preserve any documents, e-mails, texts, photos, videos, clothing, or other information, whether physical or non-physical, relating to the offense. In most circumstances, law enforcement will not pursue criminal charges without a complainant’s consent or cooperation. If you do not wish to contact them immediately, you should still take steps to preserve any physical evidence, and avoid washing or changing clothing, or utilizing the toilet. If you do change clothing, do not wash or scrub the clothing, and place it in a paper bag, not a plastic bag. Contact a friend or family member who can assist you. Contact Drew Counseling or other confidential support services, if you have any questions.

Confidentiality and Privacy

Matters reported to the variety of confidential counseling services available both off-campus and at Drew, including Drew’s psychological and pastoral counselors, as well as Health Services, will be maintained as confidential. Should fact-finding be initiated in response to a complaint, Drew requests potential parties or witnesses to keep information related to a specific fact-finding and/or complaint private, as permitted by this Policy or applicable law.  While privacy will be maintained to the extent possible, the University cannot commit to privacy on an across the board basis with respect to matters that result in fact finding and/or hearing. In addition, the University will use its best efforts not to disseminate information about an inquiry or complaint beyond those who have a need to know.  In some matters, consistent with its obligations under state and federal law, the University may be required to take reasonable investigative steps, even in the face of a student’s request for privacy or a request not to pursue fact-finding. In the event that a complainant decides not to approve any fact-finding, Drew may nonetheless be compelled to conduct an investigation in order to provide a safe environment without the threat of sexual harassment or misconduct. Consistent with federal guidance, these instances can be expected to be limited and Drew will make good faith efforts to limit the disclosure of that information to individuals involved in handling the school’s response and will advise the complainant. That decision will be made by the Title IX Coordinator, or designee. A student’s request that his or her identity not be disclosed to the accused, or that fact finding not be commenced, will necessarily limit Drew’s ability to respond fully to the incident and may preclude Drew from pursuing disciplinary action against the accused. Retaliation against a student or employee for reporting an incident, whether by other students, employees, or officials, will be addressed consistent with University Policy and can result in discipline. The provision of accommodations to students or employees seeking interim protective measures will be made after consultation with the student in after providing written notification of the range of measures available. Any protective measures provided will be maintained as confidential to the degree possible without impairing the ability to provide the accommodations or protective measures. Potential protective measures may include, but are not limited to: changing residence, adjusting work schedules or situations, adjusting academic schedules, changing transportation, permitting withdrawal/removal from a course, providing tutoring, and no contact orders. Parties and those interviewed in connection with a claim of discrimination or harassment should not disclose information about the report, investigation, mediation, or adjudication to those outside the process in order to avoid interference, claim of undue influence, or retaliation. Certain serious offenses, including reports of sexual misconduct offenses, are maintained by Drew in a daily log and in the Annual Security Report, consistent with the requirements of federal law. That information, however, is logged and listed for statistical purposes only. It does not contain names or other personally identifiable information regarding whoever reports an offense.

Sexual Misconduct: Resources and Contacts

Drew does have available, on-campus, a variety of support services and resources including housing assistance, academic support and accommodations, counseling, disability services, health and mental health services. Contact information for on and off campus resources are listed on the Resource and Contacts page immediately below.. Students seeking support and services should speak to the Dean of Students’ Office, which will coordinate assistance on behalf of the student. Incidents that result in a threat of harm to the safety or well-being of other members of the campus community or that present a pattern of conduct posing risk can result in interim suspension or the imposition of interim restrictions from portions of the University.

Sexual Misconduct: Confidential Reporting

If you have questions or concerns about discussing a matter, or are simply not ready to make a report, to either Drew or law enforcement, confidential counseling is available to students at:

  • The Drew University Center for Psychological and Counseling Services (Counseling Center) can be contacted at http://www.drew.edu/Counseling/ (973) 408-3398.
  • Pastoral counseling is also available through the University Chaplain, Tanya Bennett at: 973-408-3718. Pastoral counseling is confidential.
  • Health Services can be contacted at:  (973)-408-3414 or Fax: (973)-408-3031.

Campus Pastoral Counselors and Campus Professional Counselors hold recognized legal privileges. Federal law recognizes that Campus Pastoral Counselors and Campus Professional Counselors, when acting as such, are not considered to be campus security authorities and not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, they are encouraged to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for administrative action and/or inclusion in the annual crime statistics. Staff and faculty may also contact Drew’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP), CONCERN EAP, through Drew Human Resources (973) 408-3223 or directly at (800) 242-7371.

Other Resources and Contacts

Drew Residence Life staff can be contacted at: (973)-408-3394. The Student Disability Specialist can be contacted at: (973) – 408-3962. Off-campus Support Services and Contacts Important additional services and resources related to sexual harassment and misconduct are available to students, faculty, and staff at:

  • Morris Cares, which works with the County Sexual Assault Response Team (SART), maintains a 24/7 hotline and can be contacted at: (973) – 829-0587;
  • Jersey Battered Women’s Services (JBWS can provide support and resources for Dating or Domestic Violence or Stalking and can be contacted at their 24-Hour Helpline: 973-267-4763, or at: info@jbws.org, or by mail at: JBWS, P.O. Box 1437, Morristown, NJ 07962;
  • Jersey Center for Non-Violence is a program sponsored by JBWS to help people examine the use of force and/or abuse within intimate relationships and to learn alternatives. They can be contacted at: Email: jcnv@jbws.org; Fax: 973-539-4068; or Phone: 973-539-7801;
  • Jersey Center for Non-Violence can be contacted at: Counseling for Men and Boys: 973-539-7801 or Counseling for Women through Vista: 973-539-7801;
  • The National Stalking Resource Center can be reached at: http://www.victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center;
  • GLBTQ Resources:
  • The National Domestic Abuse Hotline:

Legal Resources:

Legal Services of Northwest New Jersey 30 Schuyler Place, 2nd Floor P.O. Box 900, Morristown, NJ 07963 Tele: (973) 285-6911 Fax: (973) 605-8991 E-mail: lsnwj-morris@lsnj.org Jersey Battered Women’s Services can also provide assistance with respect to restraining orders. Their hotline is (973)-267-4763. Volunteer Lawyers for Justice can be contacted at PO Box 32040, Newark, NJ 07102. University officials, who may be contacted to report an incident, include:

Complaints of sexual harassment or misconduct may also be reported to the Campus Conduct Hotline at 1-866-943-5787 or at investigations@drew.edu. Educational and Prevention Programs.

Academic Support Services are also available through:

  • The College of Liberal Arts: the Associate Dean for Academic Services – (973) 408-3290;
  • The Theological School: the Associate Dean for Academics – (973) 408-3647;
  • The Caspersen School of Graduate Studies:the Associate Dean – (973) 408-3283

Interim Measures

Students

There are a variety of options to avoid contact by students who are parties to a complaint involving sexual harassment and misconduct, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault. Interim measures can also be imposed for violations of other University policies. Academic and curricular activities can be changed or modified, as well as living, transportation, dining, and working situations. Class schedules can be changed. Incompletes can be awarded. Courses may be dropped without penalty. Academic support can be provided. Alternative methods of attending a class can be explored and deadlines may be extended. Drew may also impose a variety of interim remedies designed to meet the goals of this Policy. Interim measures may include:

  • No contact orders ,
  • Prohibitions on calls, texts, e-mails, electronic postings, , and scripted encounters,
  • Geographical, time, and building restrictions
  • Suspension from residential housing
  • Suspension from academic courses
  • Suspension from athletic or other extracurricular activities
  • Check-in requirements

Students requesting a meeting following imposition of an interim measure may be accompanied by an advisor of their choosing, without voice, delay, or disruption, but must schedule such meeting prior to any change or modification.

Employees

A variety of interim measures may be instituted for employees as well. Work settings, locations, and activities can be changed or modified. Interim measures may include:

  • No contact orders,
  • Prohibitions on calls, texts, e-mails, electronic postings, , and scripted encounters,
  • Geographical and building restrictions,
  • Suspension with pay,
  • Suspension without pay,
  • training or education,
  • Sign-in requirements, or
  • Other measures appropriate to the matter

Incidents that indicate there is a threat of harm to the safety or well-being of any member of the campus community can result in immediate restriction from the campus.

Sanctions

Students

The University maintains the right to impose sanctions upon students found responsible for violating the Student Conduct Policy or other University policy, including specifically domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault.  Violations may result in a variety of sanctions, ranging from severe penalties to less stringent measures, as appropriate to the underlying conduct or course of conduct. The primary purpose of sanctions is generally educational and rehabilitative, although in some matters, the protection of the Drew community will be important as well. The reasons for the imposition of sanctions will be stated in the student’s file and will become a part of the student’s record. Sanctions may also be issued in abeyance, meaning that any further violation may result in the implementation of the sanction in abeyance.

  1. Revocation of Admission:  Admission to the University may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation or a violation of the University policies.
  2. Revocation of Degree:  A degree awarded from the University may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of University standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.
  3. Withholding Degree: The University may withhold the awarding of a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in the Student Conduct Policy, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.
  4. Expulsion from the University: Unconditional and permanent separation from the University. The expelled student shall be barred from the University campus and all University sponsored activities.
  5. Expulsion from the Residence Halls: Unconditional and permanent separation of the student from residing in, being around, participating in activities within or visiting the residence halls.
  6. Suspension from the University: The student is separated from the University for a specified period of time with the privilege of applying for re-entry after the period of suspension. In making a determination on the reentry application, the University will evaluate the documented (as appropriate) progress the student has made and/or any positive indication that the student is ready for re-entry. The student will need to obtain clearance from the Dean of Students, or designee, in order to return to academic work. The student will be barred from campus during his/her time of suspension, and will be treated as a trespasser if found on campus during their period of separation.
  7. Suspension from the Residence Halls: The student is required to move out of the residence hall and may not reside in, be around, participate in activities within, or visit the residence halls for a specified period of time with the privilege of applying for re-entry as a residential student after the period of suspension.  In making a determination on the re-entry application as a residential student, the University will evaluate the documented (as appropriate) progress the student has made and any positive indication that the student is ready to return to the residence halls. The student will need to obtain clearance from the Dean of Students, or designee, in order to return to the residence halls.  The student will be barred from being in or around campus housing during his/her time of suspension, and will be treated as a trespasser if found in or around campus housing during their period of separation.
  8. Restriction: The student is restricted from participating in certain University events and activities, holding leadership positions at any level in campus organizations, or from remaining a resident on campus. Certain restrictions are imposed for a specified period of time, while others may be permanent.
  9. Probation: The student is placed under a status whereby any further violation of University regulations is considered in the context of the original violation and with prejudice. The period of probation lasts for a specified period of time. Probationary status may impact a student’s ability to study abroad and/or to hold leadership positions in student organizations.
  10. Residence Hall Relocation: Room re-assignment to another residence hall or floor.
  11. Warning: Written notification to the student that any repetition of the behavior will result in more severe disciplinary action.
  12. Restitution: Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.
  13. Disclosure: In certain cases deemed appropriate by the proper authorities, information on an offense may be disclosed to individuals or the entire University community.
  14. Parental Notification:  In an effort to provide support and assistance to students, the University, in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), may notify parents or legal guardians of students who have violated the University’s Alcohol or Drug policy in which there is a health and safety emergency.
  15. Discretionary Sanctions: Educational assignments, essays, training, assessment, service to the community with a specified length of time, or other related discretionary assignments.

Employees

Violations of this policy by employees may result in a variety of sanctions, and can include severe penalties, including termination, suspension, mandatory education, letters of reprimand, or being placed on a management improvement plan, as well as training, counseling, warnings, or other outcomes appropriate to the underlying violation.

Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Training Programs

Drew organizes and presents a variety of in-person, on-line, and video programs to prevent sexual harassment and misconduct. Those programs are intended to address sexual harassment and misconduct, and in particular, in the coming year, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. These educational programs are intended to prevent harm, facilitate recognition of situations that could pose potential harm, promote effective and safe intervention, and assist in understanding institutional structures. The programs encompass community-wide, audience-specific initiatives and strategies that are designed to enhance understanding of safe conduct and identify the variety of resources that are available to students and other members of the Drew community. Presentations are provided periodically by internal and external staff, and address matters ranging from Title IX to consumption of alcohol to sexual interaction to resistance training. Programs also include training for professional staff as well as safe and positive options for students and staff to better understand bystander/upstander intervention and risk reduction.

Other programs include:

  • On-line Alcohol, Drug, and Sexual Assault Education for all first year students.
  • “SCREAM Theatre” during New Student Orientation: Intensive, interactive Peer to Peer performance of sexual assault and misconduct scenarios, including a Q & A with the audience
  • “Beyond the Books”:  Presentation to all incoming students and parents during summer orientation.  Presents the reality of substance use/abuse and sexual misconduct on campus.  Also informs students and families of campus policies, consequences for violating policies, and campus support services.
  • “Be an Upstander” – Upstander intervention training during New Student Orientation is designed to educate students on when and how to step up and intervene to prevent a potentially dangerous situation of substance over use and/or sexual misconduct. Program is delivered during mandatory, ongoing Common Hour program for all first year students.
  • “Paving the Way”: Alcohol Education program presented during fall New Student Orientation
  • “DV8 Peer Education”:  Provides awareness activities and events on an ongoing basis throughout the year.
  • “New Social Engine”:  Provides alcohol free programs and events on an ongoing basis throughout the year.
  • “Take Back the Night”: Campus march and testimonials
  • “Clothes Line Project”:  Students and community members decorate t-shirts with testimonials or words of support for survivors/victims of incest, sexual assault, and domestic and dating violence
  • “Denim Day”:  Sexual assault awareness program, including personal testimonies and presentation of information about available resources. Programming is presented in conjunction with local community programs and care providers, including Morris County Cares, Jersey Battered Women’s Services (JBWS), 5K.
  • “Rape Resistance Training”: For credit class on physical tactics for self defense

Alcoholic Beverages and Illegal Drugs

The purpose of the Drew University Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy is to promote student responsibility, respect for the community and self, and to establish a University community that is safe, healthy, and conducive to serious academic endeavors.  While students, on occasion, attempt to define their own values and make their own choices, the University expects all of its members to comply with both Drew University Policy and federal, state, and local laws as they apply to alcohol and other drugs. The University holds students accountable for the decisions they make, particularly when they have an adverse effect on the health and safety of the community, on the quality of life of other students, on the learning environment, or on the students themselves.  To support student responsibility, the University offers a wide range of educational and counseling services that provide accurate alcohol and other drug related information and evaluation. In addition to the formal services, students can gain support from faculty, staff, and other members of the community. The Policy provides a range of sanctions yet students should be aware that law enforcement may also be involved leading to arrest and charges in the appropriate venue. The Policy also seeks to establish clear community standards around alcohol and other drugs. While the policy defines guidelines for the consequences of various behaviors, the context of those behaviors will be considered when policy violations are adjudicated. Therefore, the most severe consequences will result from situations involving illegal possession, consumption, distribution or sales of controlled substances, hosting or serving to minors, and for high risk alcohol behaviors. Repeat offenders may face a higher level of sanction. Spiking or adding drugs, including prescription drugs, high-proof alcohol, or over the counter medication, to anything that can be ingested, is prohibited under Drew policy, and represents a serious breach of community standards, and will result in significant disciplinary action. Entering an academic community for many necessitates a new level of independence. Students have the privilege of making their own decisions, but must abide with the consequences of their decisions. Keeping this in mind, the University encourages students to be responsible for their actions and will use parental/guardian notification as a partnership, including informing parents/guardians of the potential health and safety concerns and/or significant sanctions. Students who need assistance in addressing concerns related to alcohol and other drug use/abuse for themselves or others are encouraged to contact Drew’s Alcohol and Other Drug counselor at 973-408-3318.  Additional information is found at: http://www.drew.edu/Counseling/services/substance-awareness-and-education

“Good Samaritan Policy” – Medical Amnesty

To safeguard students so they receive the help they need without fear of penalty or retribution, the “Good Samaritan” Medical Amnesty policy has been adopted.  Students who seek emergency medical attention for themselves, or for a student whom medical assistance is needed, for consumption of alcohol and/or other drug overdose will not be charged with violations of the Drew University code of conduct and, in addition, will not be charged under municipal law, as long as they comply with the following:

  1. Contact and obtain assistance from Residence Life Staff, Public Safety Officers, medical professionals and/or local law enforcement;
  2. Complete an assessment/evaluation with the Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor, in a timely manner; AND
  3. Meet with a member of the Residence Life and Community Standards staff.

This policy applies only to those students who activate the assistance; it does not apply to those found by University employees.  You should always call for assistance if you require it, or you see someone in need.  To activate medical assistance call Public Safety at 973-408-4444 or 4444 from a campus phone. Additional information about local and State Amnesty laws can be found in the “Hosting” section immediately below.

Alcohol -Compliance and Enforcement

Hosting

Under New Jersey’s Social Host Law, a host accepts a level of responsibility for guest behavior, the amount of alcohol consumed, and any injury that occurs due to drinking. In order to reduce the risk of incidence, common sources, high-proof alcohols, and progressive parties are specifically identified. Those stated either encourage excessive drinking, or make it difficult for the host to monitor the amounts of alcohol consumed. The University will sanction those involved with hosting a function and providing alcohol differently from an individual attending the function. The goal is to increase education and awareness of the responsibilities that go along with hosting and living in a community. Members of a room/suite found responsible for hosting will be placed on “host” probation. Students that are documented for and found responsible for hosting a party will have the amount of alcohol confiscated considered during adjudication. Students should be familiar with the penalties that can be subjected to for violations of this Policy.

Students/Alcohol

With respect to students,

  1. Alcohol possession and consumption on campus is permitted only for students of legal age (21).  Alcohol can only be consumed in a students’ room or at university sponsored events.
  2. Healthy, legal consumption does not include competitive or binge drinking.
  3. Alcohol may not be above 100 proof.
  4. Common Sources are not allowed, including kegs and other containers of alcohol, including an amount of alcohol that is not reasonable to be consumed by the above age residents of a room/suite.
  5. Students of legal age may not give, leave in an easily accessible place, or sell alcohol to minors to transport, possess, or consume.
  6. Minors may not transport, possess, consume, or purchase alcohol.   Used or empty containers found in a room or on one’s person, may constitute possession.
  7. Persons may not transport nor consume open containers of alcoholic beverages in public areas.
  8. Consumption in student rooms should not infringe on the rights of other students to study or negate any normal student activity.
  9. Alcoholic beverages may not be sold at any time except through approved liquor licenses by the university, borough and state.
  10. Public areas include hallways, foyers, stairwells, bathrooms, lounges, or other public areas, including outdoor University grounds, without an event liquor license, or any other area beyond an individually assigned resident room.  Propped room/suite doors may make that space public.[DU1]
  11. All parts of an individual suite/quad, etc. shall be considered a residence hall room.
  12. Alcohol may be confiscated or the student may be asked to pour out containers.
  13. Full responsibility for compliance with policies and laws belongs to all students.  A student will be held responsible for their guests’ actions.  Guests violating the policies and laws may be asked to leave the campus or may be trespassed.

Violation of Alcohol Policy/Drew

Level 1 Alcohol Offense

  • Underage consumption of alcohol or possession of full or empty alcohol container
  • Open container in any public area of the University, above age 21

Level 1 Adjudication—Potential sanctions

  • Attend alcohol education class (in person or online) with a $50 class fee charged to the student account
  • Educational activity or service to the Drew community
  • Additional fine up to $100
  • Official warning or written reprimand
  • Parental/guardian notification via copy of sanctioning letter or phone call
  • Disciplinary probation.

Level 2 Alcohol Offense

  • Repeat of a Level 1 offense
  • Open container in any public area of the University and under age

Level 2 Adjudication—Potential sanctions

  • Attend alcohol education class (in person or online) with a $50 class fee charged to the student account
  • Alcohol and other drug assessment.  Failure to complete an assessment and recommendations may impact a student’s ability to register for courses or continue in University Housing
  • Educational activity or service to the Drew community
  • Additional fine up to $100
  • Parental/guardian notification via copy of sanctioning letter or phone call
  • Disciplinary probation

Level 3 Alcohol Offense

  • Providing alcohol to those under the legal age (21)
  • Common source (i.e., keg, beer ball, punch bowl)
  • Repeat of any Level 1 or 2 offenses
  • Serving as the host of progressive parties
  • Consuming/hosting/providing grain alcohol or other spirit with more than 100 proof
  • Selling alcohol to another (i.e. charging entrance to a party, paying for cards or items as part of the function, etc.)
  • Hosting or participating in drinking games

Level 3 Adjudication—Potential sanctions

  • ·   Attend alcohol education class (in person or online) with a $50 class fee charged to the student account
  • ·   Alcohol and other drug assessment.  Failure to complete an assessment and recommendations may impact a student’s ability to register for courses or remain in University Housing
  • TIPS training if found responsible for hosting
  • Parental/guardian notification via copy of sanctioning letter or phone call
  • Disciplinary probation
  • Educational Sanction
  • Restriction to campus (or part of), events, etc.
  • Housing relocation
  • Housing suspension
  • University Suspension/Expulsion
  • Fine for common source, $250 per student
  • Fine, general, up to $500
  • Loss of Guest privileges or Social Host Probation wherein all members of the room/suite are unable to host guests in their room/suite for a specified period of time.

Drug Policy: Violations

Prohibitions on Use of Drugs

Drugs are defined to include controlled substances as well as all illegal drugs and misused legal drugs, both over-the counter and prescription, synthetic and other derivatives.

  1. Students may not be in possession of any controlled substance, as defined above.  Possession means that such substances are on one’s person, in one’s living environment, automobile, or known hiding location.  If a student is hosting a guest, possession extends to their guests.
  2. Consumption refers to active use or being under the influence.
  3. Distribution of controlled substance(s) is providing a person with a controlled substance, and not accepting or intending to accept money or barter.
  4. Students may not sell for money or barter, any controlled substance.
  5. Students may not manufacture via purchasing or possessing the materials necessary to make or synthesize illegal drugs for personal use, distribution, or sale.
  6. Prescribed drugs may only be in possession of, and consumed by, the individual to whom the medication has been prescribed.  Medical Marijuana cannot be consumed on campus.

Students should be aware that federal law dictates that any conviction in a court of law regarding controlled substances may lead to a loss of financial aid for a set period of time.

Drug Sanctions

Possession and Consumption

1st Offense

  • Disciplinary probation.
  • Housing suspension in abeyance. Commuter students will be restricted from access to and around the residence halls.
  • Educational activity or service to the Drew community
  • Required substance abuse assessment and compliance with recommendations.  Failure to complete an assessment and recommendations may impact a student’s ability to register for courses or continue in University Housing.
  • Parental/guardian notification via copy of sanctioning letter or phone call.
  • No board positions in co-curricular activities for the duration of probation

2nd Offense

  • Probation effective for the remainder of time enrolled at Drew
  • Suspension from residence halls.  Commuter students will be restricted from access to and around the residence halls.
  • Required substance abuse assessment and compliance with recommendations.  Failure to complete an assessment and recommendations may impact a student’s ability to register for courses or remain in University Housing.
  • Educational activity or service to the Drew community
  • Parental/guardian notification via copy of sanctioning letter or phone call.
  • No board positions in co-curricular activities for the duration of probation

3rd Offense

  • Expulsion from the University

Distribution

1st Offense

  • Suspension from the University for a specified period of time
  • Expulsion from Housing

2nd Offense

  • Expulsion from the University

Sale or Manufacturing

1st Offense

  • Expulsion from the University

Alcohol and Drug Policy: Employees

Drew prohibits the unauthorized use, possession, storage, manufacture, distribution, and sale of alcohol, controlled substances and illegal drugs on Drew’s campus or while engaged in business on Drew’s behalf, including illicit activity conducted in Drew vehicles at any time.

Alcohol and Drug Counseling

In view of the University’s commitment to educate and support the growth and development of the whole person, a full-time NJ Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselor are available to anyone in the campus community during the academic year. If you or someone you know may have a problem with alcohol and/or drugs, the counselor provides assessment, education, and individual and group counseling. Referrals off-campus and to local support groups are also available.
 Call 973 – 408 – 3318 for assistance.

Alcohol-related Statutes and Laws

Under New Jersey law, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to:

  1. Purchase, possess, consume, manufacture, or distribute alcoholic beverages
  2. Enter places licensed to sell alcoholic beverages with the intent to purchase, have served or delivered to them, alcoholic beverages
  3. Misrepresent his/her age or the age of anyone else for the purpose of purchasing alcohol or gaining entrance to a place that sells or serves alcohol It is also illegal for anyone to purchase, manufacture, or distribute alcohol to a person who is under 21 years of age. In addition to criminal sanctions for violations of State law, there is potential civil liability for serving minors or serving a person who is already intoxicated.

Madison Borough Ordinance: Alcoholic Beverages, Possession and Consumption by Minors on Private Property

The Borough of Madison prohibits possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors on private property, including on the Drew campus, or in public. An Ordinance, amended in 2013 and found in the Borough Code does contain a provision protecting minors who contact 911 to report another minor in need of medical assistance as a result of alcohol consumption. If you are in this situation, Drew strongly encourages you to immediately report a medical emergency. The Madison Borough Code § 233-1 states: Possession or consumption by persons under legal age on private property prohibited; violations and penalties:

  • A. Any person under the legal age to purchase alcoholic beverages who knowingly possesses, without legal authority, or who knowingly consumes any alcoholic beverage on private property shall be subject, upon conviction, to a fine of $250 for the first offense and $350 for any subsequent offense.
  • B. The Municipal Judge may, in addition to any other sentence imposed for the offense, suspend or postpone, for up to six months, the driving privilege of the defendant. Upon the conviction of any person under this section, Chapter 233, the Municipal Judge shall forward a report to the Division of Motor Vehicles (the “Division”) stating the first and last day of the suspension or postponement period imposed by the Municipal Judge pursuant to this section, Chapter 233. If a person is less than 17 years of age at the time of the imposition of a sentence, the period of license postponement, including a suspension or postponement of the privilege of operating a motorized bicycle, shall commence on the day the sentence is imposed and shall run for a period of six months after the person reaches the age of 17 years.
  • C. If a person, at the time of the imposition of a sentence, has a valid New Jersey driver’s license, the Municipal Judge shall immediately collect the license and forward it to the Division, along with the report. If for any reason the license cannot be collected, the Municipal Judge shall include in the report the complete name, address, date of birth, eye color, and sex of the person, as well as the first and last date of the license suspension period imposed by the Municipal Judge.
  • D. The Municipal Judge shall inform the person orally and in writing that, if the person is convicted of operating a motor vehicle during the period of license suspension or postponement, the person shall be subject to the penalties set forth in N.J.S.A. 39:3-40. A person shall be required to acknowledge receipt of the written notice in writing. Failure to receive a written notice or failure to acknowledge, in writing, the receipt of written notice shall not be a defense to a subsequent charge of violation of N.J.S.A. 39:3-40.
  • E. If the person convicted under this section, Chapter 233, is not a New Jersey resident, the Municipal Judge shall suspend or postpone, as appropriate, the nonresident driving privilege of the person based on the age of the person and submit the required report to the Division. The Municipal Judge shall not collect the license of a nonresident convicted under this section, Chapter 233. Upon receipt of a report from the Municipal Judge, the Division shall notify the appropriate officials in the licensing jurisdiction of the suspension or postponement.
    • (1) The Municipal Judge shall have the discretion to waive the penalty provisions of Subsections A, B and C above if the defendant is enrolled in an educational institution that has imposed administrative sanctions and penalties against the defendant for the offense(s).[Added 5-29-2013 by Ord. No. 16-2013]
  • F. Exceptions:
    • (1) Religious observance, presence of a parent or guardian. Nothing in Chapter 233 shall prohibit an underage person from consuming or possessing an alcoholic beverage in connection with a religious observance, ceremony or rite, or consuming or possessing an alcoholic beverage in the presence of, and with the permission of, a parent, guardian or relative who has attained the legal age to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages. As used in this section, Chapter 233, “guardian” means a person who has qualified as a guardian of the underage person pursuant to testamentary court appointment, or other applicable laws, as determined by the Municipal Judge, and “relative” means an underage person’s grandparent, aunt, uncle, sibling, or any other person related by blood or affinity.
    • (2) Performance of employment. Nothing in Chapter 233 shall prohibit possession of alcoholic beverages by any person while engaged in the performance of employment pursuant to an employment permit issued by the Director of the Division of the Alcoholic Beverage Commission, or for a bona fide hotel or restaurant, in accordance with the provisions of N.J.S.A. 33:1-26, or while actively engaged in the preparation of food while enrolled in a culinary arts or hotel management program at a county vocation school or post-secondary educational institution; however, nothing in Chapter 233 shall be construed to preclude the imposition of a penalty under these subsections, N.J.S.A. 33:1-81, or any other section of law against a person who is convicted of unlawful alcoholic beverage activity on or at premises licensed for the sale of alcoholic beverages.
    • (3) An underage person and one or two other persons, if applicable, shall be immune from prosecution under this chapter prohibiting any person under the legal age who, without legal authority, knowingly possesses or knowingly consumes an alcoholic beverage on private property if:[Added 5-29-2013 by Ord. No. 16-2013]
      • (a) One of the underage persons called 9-1-1 and reported that another underage person was in need of medical assistance due to alcohol consumption;
      • (b) The underage person who called 9-1-1 and, if applicable, one or two other persons acting in concert with the underage person who called 9-1-1, provided each of their names to the 9-1-1 operator;
      • (c) The underage person was the first person to make the 9-1-1 report; and
      • (d) The underage person and, if applicable, one or two other persons acting in concert with the underage person who made the 9-1-1 call, remained on the scene with the person under the legal age in need of medical assistance until assistance arrived and cooperated with medical assistance and law enforcement personnel on the scene.
    • (4) The underage person who received medical assistance as provided in Subsection F(3) of this section shall also be immune from prosecution under this chapter prohibiting the possession or consumption of an alcoholic beverage on private property.[Added 5-29-2013 by Ord. No. 16-2013]

Drugs/Controlled Substances

Both federal and State law prohibit the possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs. Understanding the consequences of violating these laws is critical. The consequences of drug possession, use, and distribution vary depending on the type of drug and the quantities involved. Strict penalties are provided for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses. The following information, although not complete, provides an overview of federal penalties.

Denial of Federal Benefits (21 U.S.C. 862).

A federal drug conviction may result in the loss of federal benefits including school loans, grants, scholarships, contracts, and licenses. Federal drug trafficking convictions may result in the denial of federal benefits for up to five years for a first conviction, 10 years for a second conviction, and a permanent denial of benefits for a third conviction. Federal drug convictions for possession may result in denial of federal benefits for up to one year for a first conviction and up to five years for subsequent convictions.

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21U.S.C. 841)

Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the substance involved in the transaction. The list below is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for subsequent convictions are twice as severe. If death or serious bodily injury results from the use of a controlled dangerous substance that has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal drug charges of distributing the substances faces a mandatory life sentence and fines ranging up to $8 million. Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a school (21USC 845a) face penalties of prison terms and fines that are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least one year.

State of New Jersey Drug Laws

The New Jersey Comprehensive Drug Reform Act (N.J.S.A. 2C: 35-1 et seq.) created new offenses, increased penalties for some existing offenses to “ensure the imposition of stern, consistent punishment for all drug offenders,” and transferred all drug offenses into the State’s Code of Criminal Justice. The Drug-Free School Zone Law (N.J.S.A 2C:35-1.1) imposes increased penalties and sanctions on those found to possess drugs within a Drug Free School Zone. Drew University is within 1,000 feet of an elementary school and a nursery school and, therefore, is within a drug-free school zone as defined under New Jersey law. That physical proximity subjects people who possess or deal drugs on campus to the possibility of being subjected to serious criminal penalties. Any person who distributes, dispenses, or possesses with intent to distribute a controlled dangerous substance anywhere at Drew is subject to arrest, time in jail, and a fine up to $150,000 depending upon the amount of substance possessed. During part of this term of imprisonment there is no eligibility for parole.

Potential penalties and/or sanctions:

Simple possession, use, or being under the influence of:

  • Marijuana: 0-18 months in jail; a fine of $500 to $15,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Cocaine/Crack: 3-5 years in jail; a fine of $1,000 to $25,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Amphetamine (“Speed”): 3-5 years in jail, a fine of $1,000 to $25,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Psilocybin (“Shrooms”) and LSD: 3-5 years in jail; a fine of $1,000 to $25,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.

Possession of

  • MDMA/Ecstasy: .50 oz. or less: maximum fine $100,000; maximum prison sentence of 5 years in jail, 2 1/2 years without parole; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • MDMA/Ecstasy: .50 oz. to 5.0 oz.: maximum fine $150,000; maximum prison sentence of 10 years in jail, 5 years without parole; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • MDMA/Ecstasy: 5.0 oz. or more: maximum fine $250,000; maximum prison sentence of 20 years in jail, 10 years without parole; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.

Use or possession with the intent to distribute

  • Marijuana: 0-10 years in jail; a fine of $750 to $100,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Cocaine: 3-20 years in jail (with a 3-5 year mandatory sentence with no parole if the amount exceeds 5oz.); a fine of $1,000 to $300,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Amphetamine (“Speed”): 3-10 years in jail; a fine of $1,000 to $100,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Psilocybin (“Shrooms”) and LSD: 3-5 years in jail; a fine of $2,000 to $300,000; and a mandatory loss of driver’s license from 6 months to 2 years.

Possession or distribution

  • Ketamine: maximum fine $100,000; maximum prison sentence of 5 years in jail, 2 1/2 years without parole; mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • Rohypnol (Flunitrazepam): maximum fine $100,000; maximum prison sentence of 5 years in jail, 2 1/2 years without parole; mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • GHB (Gamma Hydroxybutrate) and GBL (Gamma Butyrlactone): maximum fine $100,000; maximum prison sentence of 5 years in jail, 2 1/2 years without parole; revocation of driver’s license for a maximum of 6 months; mandatory loss of driver’s license for 6 months to 2 years.

In addition to the foregoing fines, every defendant who is convicted of any drug offense or who goes into a drug diversionary program must pay a mandatory penalty ranging from $500 to $3,000 and a mandatory $50 laboratory fee. The Act provides that any person, 18 years or older, who uses, solicits, or directs a juvenile (17 years or younger) to manufacture or distribute drugs is guilty of a second degree crime and is subject to imprisonment for 5-10 years and a fine up to $300,000.

Use or possession of drug paraphernalia

  • Up to 6 months in jail; mandatory fine of $500 to $1,000; and a mandatory loss of license for 6 months to 2 years.
  • It is unlawful for any person to deliver drug paraphernalia to a person under 18 years of age.

Signs and Symptoms of Substance Abuse and Problematic Drinking

  • Increase in alcohol tolerance
  • Urgency to have the first drink
  • Drinking because you are angry, upset, or stressed
  • Your personality is altered when drinking
  • Drinking the night before has caused you to miss or to be late for class
  • You sometimes have a drink to help you sleep
  • When you drink, you wind up drunk
  • You promise yourself you will cut down or stop, but that only lasts a short time, if at all
  • Someone has expressed concern over your drinking
  • It is difficult to stop after one or two drinks
  • The day after drinking you have trouble remembering parts of the night (blackouts)
  • You regret things you have said or done while drinking
  • Even after others have stopped, you want to continue drinking
  • You get irritated when anyone talks about your drinking
  • At times, grades have suffered because of drinking
  • A significant part of the day is spent getting, using, or recovering from the effects of alcohol

Signs and Symptoms of Problematic Drug Use[SSR3]

  • Loss of appetite, increase in appetite, changes in eating habits, unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Slowed or staggering walk; poor physical coordination
  • Red, watery eyes; pupils larger or smaller than usual; blank stare
  • Puffy face, blushing, or paleness
  • Smell of substance on breath, body, or clothes
  • Extreme hyperactivity; excessive talkativeness
  • Runny nose, hacking cough
  • Excessive sweating
  • Tremors or shakes of hands, feet, or head
  • Change in overall attitude/personality
  • Change in activities or hobbies
  • Drop in grades, skipping class
  • Difficulty paying attention; forgetfulness
  • General lack of motivation, energy, self-esteem; “I don’t care” attitude
  • Moodiness, irritability, or nervousness
  • Paranoia
  • Secretive or suspicious behavior
  • Change in personal grooming habits
  • Change in peer group or isolation from others

Reporting of Criminal Offenses

The Drew University Public Safety Department prepares this report in order to meet its obligations under federal law, including the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. This report is also prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies with jurisdiction over the Drew campus and other locations as defined below in the Location Definition section. In addition, the Office of the Dean of Students provides information included in Drew’s statistical reporting. The reported statistics are drawn from crime reports, arrests and internal administrative conduct or disciplinary referrals. University faculty, staff and administrators, as well as student employees and volunteers with the responsibility for supervising students or responsibility for their welfare are required to report sexual harassment or misconduct offenses, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault to designated University officials. This obligation does not extend to employees with legal privileges generally precluding disclosure, such as psychological or psychiatric counselors, medical staff, or ministers in a pastoral function Other Drew employees, as well, must report instances of sexual harassment or misconduct, including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or sexual assault when they become aware of such acts or reports. This year’s report makes a good faith effort to report newly designated categories of criminal offenses for the 2013 calendar year. The report also seeks to incorporate variety of policy statements and descriptions of training in prevention programs that will be required under recently enacted federal legislation. Each year, Drew Public Safety will provide a link to this report through an e-mail notification to all enrolled students. The crimes, listed in Appendix A below, and as defined under the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook, are mandated by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act to be reported.Drew’s statistics consist of an itemization of the number of reports regarding such offenses as received by officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities and are compiled by Drew Public Safety. This information is distributed annually on October 1 through the Public Safety’s annual report to all current students, faculty and staff. The report also includes incidents not reported to the police that may have been reported confidentially to a campus security authority. The report also contains statistics for arrests and referrals to the campus conduct process for liquor law violations, drug abuse violations, and weapon law violations.Under the Clery Act, Drew is required to report statistics for the specified offenses, notably weapons, drug, and liquor law violations that are referred for disciplinary action. As result, the statistics include the referral of matters that result in the initiation of disciplinary action for which a record is kept and which may result in the imposition of the sanction. These matters are handled by the Office of the Dean of Students. Federal law also requires that all hate crime in the mandated categories be reported. Those crimes are further categorized by the nature of the bias, i.e. race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity and disability. Additional information about the locations and geography for which offenses must be reported may be found later on in this document in the Location Definition section below.

Obligation to Report Serious Criminal Offenses to Public Safety

Senior Drew administrators and staff are obliged to provide to Drew Public Safety any reports that come to their attention of criminal offenses required under the Clery Act and listed below. This obligation extends to: senior administrators, including the President, vice presidents, assistant vice presidents, deans, associate and assistant deans, directors, assistant directors, residence directors, resident assistants, coaches, managers, coordinators and all Public Safety personnel. The obligation to report does not extend to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor. Crimes that must be reported to Public Safety and disclosed include: criminal homicide, murder and non-negligent homicide, negligent manslaughter, sex offenses, including rape, fondling, incest, statutory rape, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle threats, arson, arrests and disciplinary actions, such as arrests for liquor law violations, drug law violations and illegal weapons possession. In addition, the number of each type of crime listed above that are determined to be hate crimes, based on bias, gender, gender identity, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin and disability, must be reported and disclosed. In addition, the number of crimes determined to be hate crimes and which constitute larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, destruction/damage/vandalism of property, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking must be reported as well. The statistics will be logged and disclosed for the calendar year in which the crime was reported to local police or to a campus security authority. The annual disclosure of crime statistics will be prepared by reviewing logged reports as well as student conduct records for conduct violations that are required to be included in the annual security report. Publicly available records maintained for purposes of Clery Act reporting will not include identifying information about the victim. All members of the Drew Community are encouraged to report any suspicious activity or person seen in the parking lots or loitering around vehicles, inside buildings, or around residential halls immediately to Public Safety, or to other campus security authorities. When reports of the crimes listed above are determined to constitute a threat to students and employees, Drew will issue an emergency notification or timely warning if such a warning would aid in the prevention of similar crimes

Drew Crime Statistics

The following information pertaining to reports of categories specific criminal offenses in specified geographic areas is reported annually to the Department of Education in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. In addition, in compliance with recent guidance from the federal government, the annual Drew Security Report includes statistics for the 2013 calendar year for those new categories of offenses, as defined under the 2013 Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. Those offenses are: domestic violence, dating violence, harassment and stalking, as well as certain bias offenses. This Report represents a “good faith effort” to capture this information from our existing data and to extrapolate the results based on the newly defined categories. In subsequent reporting years this information will be incorporated into the main statistical report. Category                2013

Domestic Violence 2
Dating Violence 0
Harassment 0
Stalking 0

Drew Crime Statistics

The following information pertaining to specific crime categories and geographic areas is reported annually to the Department of Education in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

Table 1: Criminal Offenses on Campus

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 3 4 4
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 2 1
Burglary 39 39 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 1 1 0
Arson 0 0 0

Table 2: Criminal Offenses Occurring in Residence Halls

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 4 2 5
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 36 15 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0

Note:In 2012, an Arson was committed in an Academic (non-residence)  building, which is under investigation.

Table 3: Criminal Offenses in Non-Campus Buildings

(see geographic area definitions)

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0

Table 4: Criminal Offenses on Public Property

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0

Table 5: Criminal Offenses on Campus  – Hate Crimes

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0

Table 6: Criminal Offenses In Residence Halls – Hate Crimes

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0

Table 7: Criminal Offenses In Non Campus Buildings – Hate Crimes

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0

Table 8: Criminal Offenses On Public Property – Hate Crimes

2011 2012 2013
Murder/Non-negligent homicide 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Nonforcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0
Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0

Table 9: Arrests On Campus

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 9 8 4
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Table 10: Arrests in Residence Hall

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 4 7 2
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Table 11: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Crimes On Campus

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 258 323 291
Drug Law violations 98 93 152
Illegal Weapons Possessions 1 2 2

Table 12: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Crimes in Residence Halls

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 216 286 245
Drug Law violations 68 62 107
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 1 1

Table 13: Arrests at Non-Campus Buildings

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Table 14: Number of Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals for Non-Campus Buildings

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Table 15: Arrests on Public Property

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Table 16: Disciplinary Actions or Judicial Referrals on Public Property

2011 2012 2013
Liquor Law violations 0 0 0
Drug Law violations 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Possessions 0 0 0

Location Definitions: Drew University Property

The federal government defines the locations and geography with respect to which offenses must be reported. Drew lists reports of offenses occurring:

  • on-campus, including any building or property owned or controlled by Drew and used by Drew in direct support of, or in a manner related to, Drew’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the campus, but is controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes;
  • at or on a non-campus building or property, including a building or property owned or controlled by an institution in direct support of, or relation, to Drew’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not in the same reasonably contiguous geographic area as Drew; and
  • on public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that are within the campus or immediately adjacent to or assessable from the campus. Offenses that occur on privately owned homes on or adjacent to the Drew campus are not reported.

Drew University’s core campus is defined as within the limits of Madison Avenue on the east, Loantaka Way on the north, Glenwild Road on the west and Woodcliff Drive on the south. (see attached map or reference www.drew.edu/map/) It is located entirely within the jurisdiction of Madison, N.J. and Morris County. It covers an area of approximately 180 acres of woodland as well as developed properties including administrative buildings, academic buildings, service buildings and residential halls, athletic fields and parking lots. There are no public properties or roadways within the campus. The sidewalk areas adjacent to the university property along Madison Avenue, Glenwild Road, and Loantaka Way are the only public properties associated or contiguous to the campus. University owned non-student faculty/staff residences are located on Loantaka Way, Madison Avenue, Vinal Place and Woodcliff Drive. In addition, the following locations are within the scope of the required statistical collection: buildings and property that are part of the campus; Drew’s non-campus buildings and property; and public property within or immediately adjacent to an assessable from the campus. Clery statistics are compiled for limited public areas adjacent to the campus and all buildings and property contained on the campus. Separate but included statistics are also compiled for residence halls except for non-student housing. Fire statistics and public reports are also maintained for all University properties.

Appendix A

Criminal Offense Definitions under Federal and State Law

Federal UCR Definitions

Criminal Offenses are defined as outlined by the U.S. Department of Justice, FBI National Incident-Based Reporting System, Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook:

  • Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.
  • Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
  • Forcible Sex Offense: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly or against that person’s will. Includes forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling. Includes not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.
  • Non-Forcible Sex Offenses: Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse. Includes incest and statutory rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object,
  • Sex Offense Definitions from the Uniform Crime Reporting Program and set out in www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/20/2014-14384/violence-against-women
  • Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  • Fondling: The touching of the private body part of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law
  • Robbery: The taking, or attempted taking, of anything of value from one person’s care, custody or control by another, in which the offender uses force or the threat of violence and causes fear.
  • Aggravated Assault: An unlawful attack by one person upon another, in which the offender uses or displays a weapon in a threatening manner for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. The victim suffers severe injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.
  • Burglary: The unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft.
  • Motor-Vehicle Theft: The theft of a motor vehicle, including automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, and mopeds.
  • Arson: The willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle, or aircraft, or personal property of another.
  • Liquor-Law Violations: The violation of laws prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages. Does not include driving under the influence or drunkenness violations.
  • Drug-Law Violations: The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment needed to produce or use them.
  • Weapons-Law Violations: The violation of laws prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, knives, explosives, or other deadly weapons.
  • Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship or intimate nature with the victim, included but not limited to, sexual, physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. It does not include acts covered by domestic violence. (Proposed Regulations, www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/20/2014-14384/violence-against-women
  • Domestic Violence: a crime of violence committed by (1) a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim,(2) by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common (3) by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner (4) by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic of family violence lase of New Jersey, or (5) by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of New Jersey. www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/20/2014-14384/violence-against-women
  • Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress. www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/20/2014-14384/violence-against-women

Sexual Misconduct Offenses Defined Under New Jersey Law:

Domestic Violence
  • 2C:25-19. Definitions As used in this act:
  • a. “Domestic violence” means the occurrence of one or more of the following acts inflicted upon a person protected under this act by an adult or an emancipated minor:
  • (1) Homicide N.J.S. 2C:11-1 et seq.
  • (2) Assault N.J.S. 2C:12-1
  • (3) Terroristic threats N.J.S. 2C:12-3
  • (4) Kidnapping N.J.S. 2C:13-1
  • (5) Criminal restraint N.J.S. 2C:13-2
  • (6) False imprisonment N.J.S. 2C:13-3
  • (7) Sexual assault N.J.S. 2C:14-2
  • (8) Criminal sexual contact N.J.S. 2C:14-3
  • (9) Lewdness N.J.S. 2C:14-4
  • (10) Criminal mischief N.J.S. 2C:17-3
  • (11) Burglary N.J.S. 2C:18-2
  • (12) Criminal trespass N.J.S. 2C:18-3
  • (13) Harassment N.J.S. 2C:33-4
  • (14) Stalking P.L.1992, c.209 (C.2C:12-10)
  • When one or more of these acts is inflicted by an un-emancipated minor upon a person protected under this act, the occurrence shall not constitute “domestic violence,” but may be the basis for the filing of a petition or complaint pursuant to the provisions of section 11 of P.L.1982, c.77 (C.2A:4A-30).
  • b. “Law enforcement agency” means a department, division, bureau, commission, board or other authority of the State or of any political subdivision thereof which employs law enforcement officers.
  • c. “Law enforcement officer” means a person whose public duties include the power to act as an officer for the detection, apprehension, arrest and conviction of offenders against the laws of this State.
  • d. “Victim of domestic violence” means a person protected under this act and shall include any person who is 18 years of age or older or who is an emancipated minor and who has been subjected to domestic violence by a spouse, former spouse, or any other person who is a present or former household member. “Victim of domestic violence” also includes any person, regardless of age, who has been subjected to domestic violence by a person with whom the victim has a child in common, or with whom the victim anticipates having a child in common, if one of the parties is pregnant. “Victim of domestic violence” also includes any person who has been subjected to domestic violence by a person with whom the victim has had a dating relationship.
  • e. “Emancipated minor” means a person who is under 18 years of age but who has been married, has entered military service, has a child or is pregnant or has been previously declared by a court or an administrative agency to be emancipated.

Dating Violence

Under New Jersey law, dating violence could be prosecuted under the domestic violence statutes, as well as under other laws, including harassment. It is also included within the category of offenses defined under recent legislative initiatives designed to address dating violence in K-12 settings as follows: Dating violence” is “[a] pattern of behavior where one person threatens to use, or actually uses physical, sexual, verbal, or emotional abuse to control a dating partner.” N.J.S.A. 18A:37-34.

Sexual Assault

New Jersey law, N.J.S.A. 2C:14-2, defines sexual assault as follows:

Sexual assault
  • a. An actor is guilty of aggravated sexual assault if he commits an act of sexual penetration with another person under any one of the following circumstances:
    • (1) The victim is less than 13 years old;
    • (2) The victim is at least 13 but less than 16 years old; and
      • (a) The actor is related to the victim by blood or affinity to the third degree, or
      • (b) The actor has supervisory or disciplinary power over the victim by virtue of the actor’s legal, professional, or occupational status, or
      • (c) The actor is a resource family parent, a guardian, or stands in loco parentis within the household;
    • (3) The act is committed during the commission, or attempted commission, whether alone or with one or more other persons, of robbery, kidnapping, homicide, aggravated assault on another, burglary, arson or criminal escape;
    • (4) The actor is armed with a weapon or any object fashioned in such a manner as to lead the victim to reasonably believe it to be a weapon and threatens by word or gesture to use the weapon or object;
    • (5) The actor is aided or abetted by one or more other persons and the actor uses physical force or coercion;
    • (6) The actor uses physical force or coercion and severe personal injury is sustained by the victim;
    • (7) The victim is one whom the actor knew or should have known was physically helpless or incapacitated, intellectually or mentally incapacitated, or had a mental disease or defect which rendered the victim temporarily or permanently incapable of understanding the nature of his conduct, including, but not limited to, being incapable of providing consent.

Aggravated sexual assault is a crime of the first degree. Except as otherwise provided in subsection d. of this section, a person convicted under paragraph (1) of this subsection shall be sentenced to a specific term of years which shall be fixed by the court and shall be between 25 years and life imprisonment of which the person shall serve 25 years before being eligible for parole, unless a longer term of parole ineligibility is otherwise provided pursuant to this Title.

  • b. An actor is guilty of sexual assault if he commits an act of sexual contact with a victim who is less than 13 years old and the actor is at least four years older than the victim.
  • c. An actor is guilty of sexual assault if he commits an act of sexual penetration with another person under any one of the following circumstances:
    • (1) The actor uses physical force or coercion, but the victim does not sustain severe personal injury;
    • (2) The victim is on probation or parole, or is detained in a hospital, prison or other institution and the actor has supervisory or disciplinary power over the victim by virtue of the actor’s legal, professional or occupational status;
    • (3) The victim is at least 16 but less than 18 years old and:
      • (a) The actor is related to the victim by blood or affinity to the third degree; or
      • (b) The actor has supervisory or disciplinary power of any nature or in any capacity over the victim; or
      • (c) The actor is a resource family parent, a guardian, or stands in loco parentis within the household;
    • (4) The victim is at least 13 but less than 16 years old and the actor is at least four years older than the victim.

Sexual assault is a crime of the second degree.

  • d. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection a. of this section, where a defendant is charged with a violation under paragraph (1) of subsection a. of this section, the prosecutor, in consideration of the interests of the victim, may offer a negotiated plea agreement in which the defendant would be sentenced to a specific term of imprisonment of not less than 15 years, during which the defendant shall not be eligible for parole. In such event, the court may accept the negotiated plea agreement and upon such conviction shall impose the term of imprisonment and period of parole ineligibility as provided for in the plea agreement, and may not impose a lesser term of imprisonment or parole or a lesser period of parole ineligibility than that expressly provided in the plea agreement. The Attorney General shall develop guidelines to ensure the uniform exercise of discretion in making determinations regarding a negotiated reduction in the term of imprisonment and period of parole ineligibility set forth in subsection a. of this section.
Consent:

Under New Jersey law, consent is not specifically defined as an element of the criminal act of rape. It can, however, be asserted as defense. In this connection, judges instruct juries as follow: As part of (his/her) defense, the defendant contends that the State has not proven each element of the offense beyond a reasonable doubt because the victim consented to the alleged criminal activity. In considering this contention you should understand that consent of the victim can be a complete defense to a criminal charge only under certain limited circumstances which I will describe for you. First, you should know that consent in the law has a meaning very similar to its everyday meaning. It is the victim’s voluntary and serious agreement or submission to the alleged criminal conduct or the result of that conduct. In order for consent to give rise to a valid defense it must, of course, be given freely and it must be legally effective. Consent can never be legally effective in providing a defense to a criminal charge if:

  • (a) the victim was not legally competent to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense; or
  • (b) the victim was by reason of (his/her) (choose appropriate factor) youth, mental disease or defect or intoxication either known by the defendant to be unable or was manifestly unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature of harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute an offense; or
  • (c) the victim’s consent was induced by force, duress or deception of a kind that the law defining the offense seeks to prevent.

In determining whether the consent of the victim was freely and voluntarily given, you are advised that consent may be openly expressed, implied, or apparent from the victim’s willing participation in the activity in question. Further, you may consider all that (he/she) said and did at the particular time and place, all of the surrounding circumstances and whether a normal competent person would freely and seriously consent to the conduct with which the defendant is charged.

Stalking

New Jersey law, N.J.S.A. 2C:12-10, defines “stalking” as follows: Definitions; stalking designated a crime;

  • a. As used in this act:
    • (1) “Course of conduct” means repeatedly maintaining a visual or physical proximity to a person; directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, following, monitoring, observing, surveilling, threatening, or communicating to or about, a person, or interfering with a person’s property; repeatedly committing harassment against a person; or repeatedly conveying, or causing to be conveyed, verbal or written threats or threats conveyed by any other means of communication or threats implied by conduct or a combination thereof directed at or toward a person.
    • (2) “Repeatedly” means on two or more occasions.
    • (3) “Emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or distress.
    • (4) “Cause a reasonable person to fear” means to cause fear which a reasonable victim, similarly situated, would have under the circumstances.
  • b. A person is guilty of stalking, a crime of the fourth degree, if he purposefully or knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his safety or the safety of a third person or suffer other emotional distress.
  • c. A person is guilty of a crime of the third degree if he commits the crime of stalking in violation of an existing court order prohibiting the behavior.
  • d. A person who commits a second or subsequent offense of stalking against the same victim is guilty of a crime of the third degree.
  • e. A person is guilty of a crime of the third degree if he commits the crime of stalking while serving a term of imprisonment or while on parole or probation as the result of a conviction for any indictable offense under the laws of this State, any other state or the United States.
  • f. This act shall not apply to conduct which occurs during organized group picketing.

Hate Crime

Hate Crime is defined as a criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias.  Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation or ethnicity/national origin.  For Clery Act reporting purposes, hate crimes include any offense in the following list that is motivated by bias:

  • Murder and Non-negligent manslaughter
  • Forcible Sex offenses
  • Non-forcible sex offenses
  • Robbery
  • Aggravated Assault
  • Burglary
  • Motor Vehicle Theft
  • Arson
  • Destruction/Damage/Vandalism to Property
  • Intimidation
  • Larceny/Theft
  • Simple Assault